Author Topic: Wild Atlantic Way Audax 2020  (Read 13572 times)

Re: Wild Atlantic Way Audax 2020
« Reply #175 on: December 11, 2019, 06:57:36 pm »

Cork - Kinsale

I did plot a route to cycle from Cork in 2016, but never rode it, as Seamus picked us up from the train station.  Can you share a link to a quiet route from Cork Airport to Kinsale ?  It looks like I'll be able to get away with just unbolting the seat and handlebars, and taking the rear derailleur off my recumbent, before packaging it up for flight.  So not too much to do at the Cork end before I can ride it.

Here is the route. Once you exit the airport @ 0.5km, there are no turns / junctions until you reach Kinsale.
https://ridewithgps.com/routes/31584533

Irish Drivers

In 2016 I actually found the drivers pretty decent, compared to SE England drivers, apart from when we were passing through Sligo.  The traffic then was pretty light though, on the roads we went down, don't know what it'll be like four years on.


Having done LEL and 1200k in Wales/Eng/Scot last year, I found British drivers more considerate. Drivers here are rarely malicious, but they just dont see anything wrong with treating cyclists like inanimate objects. But traffic will be quiet most days, expect the ring of Kerry and around Galway and Sligo to be the busiest.

Re: Wild Atlantic Way Audax 2020
« Reply #176 on: December 11, 2019, 07:21:09 pm »
If you are cycling from Cork, get in touch and I'll send a quiet route (hint: the road from the airport to the city is one to avoid cycling on).

This'll be handy as I'm planning to sailrail it.

Are you planning on arriving in Dublin or Rosslare?
In Dublin, you'll have a few km through the city to get from port to train station.
Rosslare might not work at all. No direct rail from Rosslare to Cork, so you probably will have to go up to Dublin to come back down to Cork!

FifeingEejit

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Re: Wild Atlantic Way Audax 2020
« Reply #177 on: December 11, 2019, 08:34:08 pm »
If you are cycling from Cork, get in touch and I'll send a quiet route (hint: the road from the airport to the city is one to avoid cycling on).

This'll be handy as I'm planning to sailrail it.

Are you planning on arriving in Dublin or Rosslare?
In Dublin, you'll have a few km through the city to get from port to train station.
Rosslare might not work at all. No direct rail from Rosslare to Cork, so you probably will have to go up to Dublin to come back down to Cork!

The Irish leg of the outbound journey will be Heuston to Kent; ideas on how to get from the Stena terminal at Dublin port to Heuston would be handy too.

Return journey will probably be a late train from Derry to Belfast for a morning ferry as Stranraer to Dundee/Leuchars takes most of the day.

Re: Wild Atlantic Way Audax 2020
« Reply #178 on: December 11, 2019, 11:32:01 pm »

The Irish leg of the outbound journey will be Heuston to Kent; ideas on how to get from the Stena terminal at Dublin port to Heuston would be handy too.

Return journey will probably be a late train from Derry to Belfast for a morning ferry as Stranraer to Dundee/Leuchars takes most of the day.

Stena port to Heuston station is an easy navigation, its along the quays. From the ferry port, follow directions to city centre and basically follow the river for another few km. The rail station is just after the Guinness brewery.

FifeingEejit

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Re: Wild Atlantic Way Audax 2020
« Reply #179 on: December 26, 2019, 12:39:48 am »
Whats the deal with AAA points on overseas events?
I. E. Can you claim them?
Looks like it would be 26ish points if you can

Sent from my BKL-L09 using Tapatalk


Re: Wild Atlantic Way Audax 2020
« Reply #180 on: December 26, 2019, 08:04:00 am »
Whats the deal with AAA points on overseas events?
I. E. Can you claim them?
Looks like it would be 26ish points if you can

Sent from my BKL-L09 using Tapatalk

You can claim them. I think you need to send the track to the AAA sec after completion.

FifeingEejit

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Re: Wild Atlantic Way Audax 2020
« Reply #181 on: December 26, 2019, 11:09:20 am »
Whats the deal with AAA points on overseas events?
I. E. Can you claim them?
Looks like it would be 26ish points if you can

Sent from my BKL-L09 using Tapatalk

You can claim them. I think you need to send the track to the AAA sec after completion.

Hm, I associate the west coast of Ireland with wild fluctuations in barometric pressure... Could be interesting readings in that  :P
(The 26ish is from the NASA SRTM DEM google use which will probably miss a lot of the littler lumps)

Good to know, thanks  :)

Re: Wild Atlantic Way Audax 2020
« Reply #182 on: December 26, 2019, 12:47:10 pm »
Whats the deal with AAA points on overseas events?
I. E. Can you claim them?
Looks like it would be 26ish points if you can

Sent from my BKL-L09 using Tapatalk

You can claim them. I think you need to send the track to the AAA sec after completion.

Hm, I associate the west coast of Ireland with wild fluctuations in barometric pressure... Could be interesting readings in that  :P
(The 26ish is from the NASA SRTM DEM google use which will probably miss a lot of the littler lumps)

Good to know, thanks  :)

I believe AAA assessment uses an elevation model, which may well be SRTM for Ireland. What SRTM resolution it uses, is anyone's guess.

FifeingEejit

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Re: Wild Atlantic Way Audax 2020
« Reply #183 on: December 26, 2019, 06:51:01 pm »
Probably 90m... :-(

Ran it through the analyser tool:
What I find interesting is that despite the datasource being "GPX" for the data which I take to mean it's using RWGPS' elevations that are put into the GPX

RWGPS says 21260m of climb in 22017km

But the tool says:
Total Distance: 2199.3 km
Total Climbing: 26283 m
AAA Points: 26.25
Data Source: GPX file

Wish Strava's route tool was better as they use crowdsourced barometric data for their elevations.


EDIT:
According to https://ridewithgps.com/help/grade-and-elevation

RWGPS :
When you plan a route on the website, the elevation used comes from a data set that was taken during a shuttle mission in the early 2000’s, where the shuttle orbited the earth and scanned the surface using radar, to estimate elevation. The resulting elevation dataset is a grid with 90 meter spacing between points, and for each point in a route planned using our software, we lookup the elevation using this dataset. We do a little math to enhance the accuracy of the estimate by interpolating between points. For example, if the point falls in the middle of a cell in the elevation dataset, we interpolate between neighboring points to estimate the elevation at that point. We have a couple higher precision datasets in specific areas that we use instead of SRTM where available, but the majority of routes planned outside of the United States use the SRTM dataset.

So yeah it's the 90m data that I've worked with for landscape creation before, but they do a little fiddling with it.