Author Topic: 28mm vs 32mm  (Read 1595 times)

Karla

  • car(e) free
    • Lost Byway - a Pacific bike ride
Re: 28mm vs 32mm
« Reply #25 on: February 28, 2019, 09:54:26 am »
Thanks for the educashun Brucey, apparently there are these things called statistics?  I never knew! 

Ok, that's a lie, I also use them at work.  I also know what I'm talking about wrt Chung testing, and have you the start of AV error analysis on it (don't worry, there's more) which you completely ignored.    Keep on pulling it out of your hind though  :thumbsup:

Re: 28mm vs 32mm
« Reply #26 on: February 28, 2019, 10:15:38 am »
apologies if I am stating the b. obvious here but there are such things as justified criticisms and then there are such things as unjustified criticisms.  Without at least a smattering of information or cogent discussion one thing looks very much like another....?

Recourse to insults, abuse etc is hardly likely to improve matters, is it?


Karla

  • car(e) free
    • Lost Byway - a Pacific bike ride
Re: 28mm vs 32mm
« Reply #27 on: February 28, 2019, 02:19:31 pm »
Justified criticisms' like grams' criticism of the Heine article for giving meaningless numbers, yes.  Or of Anhalt for doing a test procedure that I'm pretty sure he doesn't have a proper handle on, that too.

Re: 28mm vs 32mm
« Reply #28 on: February 28, 2019, 04:53:33 pm »
My advice is that you carry out your own tests -on your bike, on your roads-  to see what is going on and whether it might be significant or not.  My take on it is that provided you are not demonstrably slower using the wider tyres (eg during coastdown and rollout tests), you are probably better off overall in any kind of distance event.  This relies on another imponderable (which may vary greatly from one rider to another) which is that after a long  day in the saddle "more comfort = more speed".

This, in spades.
I switched to really wide, 37mm (but thin) tyres because I needed to run lowish pressures to cushion a damaged wrist. I also noticed that the wider tyres didn't tramline, rolled straight over broken surfaces without deviating and laughed at most potholes.

A guy on a sportif in the USA died because his (narrow) tyres got caught in the cracks inbetween concrete slabs on the road. His family sued the race organisers and lost.

Unless the wide tyres are costing you speed, why would you ride on skinnies?
<i>Marmite slave</i>

ElyDave

  • Royal and Ancient Polar Bear Society member 263583
Re: 28mm vs 32mm
« Reply #29 on: February 28, 2019, 05:07:53 pm »
can't get anything fatter in the frame?

I'm maxed out at 28mm on my roadbike and Cruzbike, run 37s (1.5") on the MTB runabout because it'll take them
“Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.” –Charles Dickens

Zed43

  • prefers UK hills over Dutch mountains
Re: 28mm vs 32mm
« Reply #30 on: February 28, 2019, 07:34:58 pm »
Maybe I'm just lucky, or my (low) weight makes a difference, but my impression is that I have less p*nctures with my wide (35/42/48mm) but "extra light" and low pressure tyres than people riding regular 25mm racing tyres. (and the fact that they're faster is because of their legs, not their tyres  ;D)