Author Topic: Chain Lube  (Read 3821 times)

Re: Chain Lube
« Reply #25 on: March 13, 2019, 09:42:51 am »
I've been using Shimano chain lube recently, found it pretty good. However, when riding on the dusty riverside path I'm having to relube as frequently as if I were riding in heavy rain.
<i>Marmite slave</i>

jiberjaber

  • ... Fancy Pants \o/ ...
  • ACME S&M^2
Re: Chain Lube
« Reply #26 on: March 13, 2019, 11:28:17 am »
I've stopped degreasing my chains to see if it prolonged the life of them and it would seem not, I still seem to get circa 2500km (1500miles) out of them, irrespective of lube type.

Last chain I had however just got 4300km out of it (2700 miles) and the only difference was I changed from 50/34 to 46/30 chainset.  This is with a FSA Team issue 11spd chain (which were crazy cheap at Planet X at a time)  I'm on my 3rd of that chain and will see if this distance is to be repeated or if it is an outlier - I change my chains at 0.75 wear indicated on my park tool gauge.   I've tried most lubes and seem to have settled on Finish Line wet (or 'cross country' as the German sites like to call it).
Regards,

Joergen

Re: Chain Lube
« Reply #27 on: March 15, 2019, 02:33:29 pm »
I've taken to using Finish Line Wet Ceramic over the last couple of years.
The transmission doesn't get as dirty as with Finish Line Green, and it seems to last quite well in rainy weather.

My regime is basic. The chain goes on, and I add oil and wipe down if I notice it starting to sound rough.

Rock 'N Roll Gold came out better in the friction/efficiency tests than Prolink, though the application/wipe method is similar - see:
https://www.scribd.com/document/262044061/Velo-Friction-Facts-Chain-Lube-Efficiency-Tests
Slightly disappointed that wasn't the version of the test where Extra Virgin Olive Oil was the 2nd best liquid lube (as opposed top melt-in waxes).

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Chain Lube
« Reply #28 on: March 15, 2019, 02:43:24 pm »
Extra virgin olive oil would make your chain smell best. Presumably similar friction/efficiency results could be achieved with other vegetable oils at less cost.
An ungovernable laughter, a joyous agitation which makes the summer stretching before you seem like an unrolling canvas on which you might draw those first rude pure strokes that are free. (Capote)

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: Chain Lube
« Reply #29 on: March 15, 2019, 02:50:45 pm »
Oxidation...
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Chain Lube
« Reply #30 on: March 15, 2019, 02:59:54 pm »
Self sufficiency. When stranded in a bus shelter, you could wipe the grease off your chain and fry a rat
An ungovernable laughter, a joyous agitation which makes the summer stretching before you seem like an unrolling canvas on which you might draw those first rude pure strokes that are free. (Capote)

jiberjaber

  • ... Fancy Pants \o/ ...
  • ACME S&M^2
Re: Chain Lube
« Reply #31 on: March 15, 2019, 03:19:32 pm »
Self sufficiency. When stranded in a bus shelter, you could wipe the grease off your chain and fry a rat

That might become standard in a few weeks time!
Regards,

Joergen

Re: Chain Lube
« Reply #32 on: March 16, 2019, 07:25:24 pm »
Self sufficiency. When stranded in a bus shelter, you could wipe the grease off your chain and fry a rat

That might become standard in a few weeks time!

 ;D
Old enough to know better, but young enough to do it anyway

Re: Chain Lube
« Reply #33 on: March 16, 2019, 08:02:18 pm »


chain lube could improve it...?

cheers

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Chain Lube
« Reply #34 on: March 17, 2019, 01:19:44 pm »
Excellent example of ruining a good joke by careless subtitling.  Blackadder really ought to have asked it "Rat au vin?"
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Chain Lube
« Reply #35 on: March 17, 2019, 02:00:37 pm »
I've taken to using Finish Line Wet Ceramic over the last couple of years.
The transmission doesn't get as dirty as with Finish Line Green, and it seems to last quite well in rainy weather.

How far do  you get between applications? They list on their website as claiming upto 175miles (~280km), which would mean lubing up more than once per ride, which seems a right faff to me.

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Re: Chain Lube
« Reply #36 on: March 17, 2019, 02:03:21 pm »
Excellent example of ruining a good joke by careless subtitling.  Blackadder really ought to have asked it "Rat au vin?"

yeah, but I couldn't be bothered to do it myself so I just linked to something on the interweb, even though it isn't perfect....

just don't ask Baldrick for white coffee....

cheers

Re: Chain Lube
« Reply #37 on: April 04, 2019, 12:53:33 pm »
Rock & Roll lube, blue for wet and red for dry. Blue stuff wipes off hands easily if you touch the chain.

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Chain Lube
« Reply #38 on: April 05, 2019, 03:11:42 pm »
I have favoured Purple Extreme, but this is becoming increasingly difficult to source/very expensive. The cheapest I have found today has been over £20 a bottle on Ebay. The Usual Suspects (Wiggle etc.) all seem to be out of stock, with the last displayed price around £11 a bottle. IIRC (which I might not) the last time I bought some it was about £7 a bottle.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

Re: Chain Lube
« Reply #39 on: April 05, 2019, 05:12:54 pm »
I wouldn't waste your money. Purple Extreme is no good.

Re: Chain Lube
« Reply #40 on: April 05, 2019, 05:19:25 pm »
I wouldn't waste your money. Purple Extreme is no good.

I certainly didn't do well in the efficiency tests reported here (unlike Rock n Roll Extreme and Gold): https://cyclingtips.com/2018/03/fast-chain-lube-that-saves-you-money/
Old enough to know better, but young enough to do it anyway

Re: Chain Lube
« Reply #41 on: April 05, 2019, 05:22:13 pm »
I bought a bottle and used nothing but whilst I had the bottle. The longevity claims are a joke. At best it's a summer-only apply every ride lube.

Re: Chain Lube
« Reply #42 on: April 05, 2019, 05:49:21 pm »
Pro gold is a good compromise.
Get a bicycle. You will never regret it, if you live- Mark Twain

Re: Chain Lube
« Reply #43 on: April 05, 2019, 06:10:32 pm »
It's slightly better, but only slightly. Again, you need to reapply every ride.

The issue with both these lubes is that they consist of high quantities of solvent carrier and not much lube.

Re: Chain Lube
« Reply #44 on: April 05, 2019, 07:08:23 pm »
I've taken to using Finish Line Wet Ceramic over the last couple of years.

How far do  you get between applications? They list on their website as claiming upto 175miles (~280km), which would mean lubing up more than once per ride, which seems a right faff to me.

J
I don't keep track, but it feels like every 300 miles or so

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Chain Lube
« Reply #45 on: April 06, 2019, 01:58:29 pm »
I have found Purple Extreme to be excellent. Bear in mind that my chains never get subject to the sort of abuse as those subject to the tender mercies of derailleurs.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

Re: Chain Lube
« Reply #46 on: April 06, 2019, 02:17:51 pm »
I use Purple Extreme and have for years. I get about 200 miles between applications.
Rust never sleeps

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Chain Lube
« Reply #47 on: April 06, 2019, 02:20:34 pm »
I bought a bottle of Purple Extreme back in 2007.  When it ran out, I refilled it with a mixture of white spirit and chainsaw oil, which seemed to work just as well as a chain lube.  I've played with the ratio a bit, and found that the optimal approach for road-going recumbents is to apply a thinner mixture to a clean chain, thoroughly remove the excess, and not ride the bike until all the solvent has evaporated.  This lasts hundreds of miles and minimises the accumulation of gunk in chain tubes etc.  Unfortunately, this isn't ideal for the MTB or Brompton, where the lube washes off much more quickly, and you're left either having to clean the chain again, or apply more lube to create grinding paste.

I'm still using the same bottle, so I reckon that was good value, even if the contents weren't.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Re: Chain Lube
« Reply #48 on: April 06, 2019, 02:48:08 pm »
Wowbagger's is an interesting comment.  From benign to most severe I'd rank chain service conditions in the following order

- IGH with large sprockets, good chainline and low static tension (noticeable sag in the lower chain run) inside chaincase
- as above but without chaincase
- as above but with spring-loaded tensioner
- as above but with smaller rear sprocket and/or smaller chainring
- bushingless chain on derailleur system using large sprockets and low-angle chainlines (think 2x5 systems)
- bushingless chain on derailleur systems using small sprockets and high-angle chainlines (think 1x11, 1x12 etc, or running badly cross chained e.g. on a 2x11 system)

Somewhere in the middle you can put a fixed gear or singlespeed with a high static tension; this knocks chains out faster than otherwise because dynamic chain tensions (when you go over a bump) rapidly increase in a way that can theoretically result in an infinite chain tension.

Chain lubes work by creating a lubricant film that inhibits metal to metal contact in the bushings/half bushings and/or by mitigating the consequences of that contact.  So for the former, a high film strength is required and for the latter some clever chemistry (solid lubricants, EP additives etc) are desirable.  Note that the latter type of additives can also help the chain cope with other particles (dirt, wear debris etc) that are floating around in the lube too.  It isn't clear how all chain lubes work, or if certain lubes are really better suited to some applications than others.

 The other line of defence that chains have against wear (once the lube film is breached) is super hard bushing materials.  Very narrow chains don't work at all unless they have hard bushings; the half-bushings are each only about 1mm wide in a modern chain, because the inner side plates are pierced during manufacture, which leaves a large entry radius on each side plate and a comparatively short parallel sided half-bushing.

  Cross-chaining buggers the chain up twice over; it makes metal to metal contact in the half-bushings almost inevitable and it also causes more wear between the side plates, thus loading the lube up with wear debris that grinds the chain to atoms even if the chain stays relatively free of road dirt.

In theory it ought to be possible to make a much more wear resistant 1/8" chain (for IGH/SS use) provided it has full (large area) bushings and a high film strength lube is used. However chains made this way are either dirt cheap with soft bushings ( e.g. KMC B1) or fantastically expensive, with bushings of unknown quality. In practice this means that -presumably because of economies of scale- a 3/32" bushingless chain of high quality (eg KMC X1) is most likely to have the longest (cost effective) wear life in such applications.

Using cheap chains which last about pro-rata less long is OK but has both risks and benefits; a benefit is that you may not ever feel the need to clean a chain before it goes in the bin. A major downside is that the rate of wear can become quite high, quite quickly, and this can 'catch you out' and leave you with a set of (expensive) sprockets that won't accept a new chain any more. If you use chains that are only going to last 1/3rd the mileage, there are x3 chances of being caught out this way.

cheers

Re: Chain Lube
« Reply #49 on: April 07, 2019, 03:03:51 pm »
I recently bought a bottle of Squirt wax lube for my deliverooing bike at the suggestion of an mtbing mate and I'm liking it. I've been led to believe prolonged downpours can wash it off, but so far it's been pretty tenacious in the wet, no doubt helped a bit by the guards and front flap. If it's been a particularly wet ride I'll add a bit when i get home before putting it away just to be on the safe side, otherwise it gets a drop or two every couple of weeks. Been using it for a couple of months/600-700 miles and I've not cleaned the chain yet and it remains smooth running, and best of all, spotlessly clean.