Author Topic: Front Light  (Read 6281 times)

Re: Front Light
« Reply #75 on: August 30, 2019, 04:06:34 pm »
Fenix ld22
On medium.
2 AA lithium energiser.
Day 1 ride until 2am
Day 2 until 2am
Day 3 until 2am
Final section dusk til dawn.

I had a few problems with being in my shadow from other brighter lights.. but I prefer a calmer light source.
I still haven't changed the batteries.
I had a alpkit gamma to highlight the arrows but I didn't think they were as reflective as 2011 & 2015.
So it looks like everyone had plenty of illumination and power .

Re: Front Light
« Reply #76 on: August 31, 2019, 01:15:35 pm »
I had a alpkit gamma to highlight the arrows but I didn't think they were as reflective as 2011 & 2015.
So it looks like everyone had plenty of illumination and power .
The poor design/size/amount of reflective area of the arrows is an issue that ACP could note for improvement. Perhaps there are French laws which limit the size of 'ad hoc' signs. Twice from Mortagne to Dreux around midnight we missed a turn but the stream of headlights coming back up the hill alerted the de facto group leadership to the miss, so little time lost (not like some of the other poor b*****rs). It also seemed to me that much of the signage had been erected by 'non-cyclists'. Any route advertised as 'signed', especially one which will be ridden (by some of the field) in the dark, needs a 'warning' sign for any turn off the main road (outside habitation) and if red crosses are to be used, let's make them a decent size, sited so they can be seen AFTER the wrong turn has been made (ie not right on the junction).

Re: Front Light
« Reply #77 on: August 31, 2019, 01:46:21 pm »
i remember that in last editions red crosses were planted around 10 meters after the junction.
Sometimes volunteers were stationed up road on wrong turnings to advise riders to make a u turn.
I did a lot of night riding this time so perhaps I'm more aware of the problems I had with the arrows.
I had a gpx but that doesn't stop the rest of the bunch suddenly splitting , stopping , or irratically riding across the road at a junction

simonp

  • Omnomnomnipotent.
Re: Front Light
« Reply #78 on: August 31, 2019, 03:34:51 pm »
There were long gaps between signs when you crossed side roads it was a little disconcerting to see no sign. I was glad of my gps.

Re: Front Light
« Reply #79 on: August 31, 2019, 10:08:35 pm »
I was two nights and two days on the road. Used my standard set-up of a rechargeable LED front light,
Lumicycle Apex with a 4-cell lithium battery pack (I took two). I generally get cost to 1 1/2 nights on a single battery pack - burn times vary from 50+hrs on low (160 lumens) to 3+hrs on 'boost' (1650 lumens), though generally never use the latter (the 'high' setting at 1100 lumens will give 6+ hours).
Got through the first night, and then the return from Brest to Loudeac went dusk at Carhaix and start of the 2nd night on the way to Loudeac - I had forgotten to swap the battery pack, but it wasn't a problem, it just dropped below 50% just before Loudeac.
Rear light was a Cateye Omni-5 (2x AAA batteries 5 LED, used with disposable lithiums) - Never had to change.
https://www.lumicycle.com/road-lights/apex-range/apex-2017-enduro-pack.html
Recommended!!!  :thumbsup:

Re: Front Light
« Reply #80 on: September 01, 2019, 09:27:37 am »

I had a few problems with being in my shadow from other brighter lights.. but I prefer a calmer light source.


When you say “calmer” is that just less retina searing, or something more complex?

Re: Front Light
« Reply #81 on: September 01, 2019, 11:02:03 am »
Less retina searing.
My ld20 or my old cyo is just right for me.
But I can also boost the LD 20 if I need to descend a tricky lane