Author Topic: CycleCommute.CC blog  (Read 1311 times)

CycleCommute.CC blog
« on: March 17, 2019, 09:37:50 am »
Hi everyone!

Hope you don't mind me posting this here. I've started a blog about my year round commute. It's a 35 mile round trip adding up to around 8000 miles a year and I have done it every day for over 3 years now.

The blog has stories about my experiences and encounters along the way. It also has various other bits and pieces like cost tracking, food ideas and hints & tips.

Please have a look and let me know what you think.

https://cyclecommute.cc

Re: CycleCommute.CC blog
« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2019, 10:04:38 am »
Does anyone else keep track of how much their cycling costs? I've got a comparison running for this year to show how much it saves (hopefully) compared to driving and public transport. See here:

https://cyclecommute.cc/how-much

Re: CycleCommute.CC blog
« Reply #2 on: March 22, 2019, 03:44:24 pm »
I've got a comparison running for this year to show how much it saves (hopefully) compared to driving and public transport.


Something wrong with you. What is this saving money? Haven't you heard of n+1?
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: CycleCommute.CC blog
« Reply #3 on: March 22, 2019, 04:05:11 pm »
Surely that's the point: By calculating how much you haven't spent on cars, you automatically justify n+1.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Re: CycleCommute.CC blog
« Reply #4 on: March 22, 2019, 09:59:28 pm »
Surely that's the point: By calculating how much you haven't spent on cars, you automatically justify n+1.
Haha exactly! Makes negotiating future purchases that bit easier.

Re: CycleCommute.CC blog
« Reply #5 on: March 26, 2019, 04:27:34 pm »
So in my blog post from yesterday I included a close pass video. I complained to the company and they sent a grovelling email in reply, asking me to remove the video from youtube. Does anyone think I should do so?

The video can be seen here:

https://cyclecommute.cc/2019/03/25/milestone-2/

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
Re: CycleCommute.CC blog
« Reply #6 on: March 27, 2019, 09:27:29 pm »
Leave it there, you're under no obligation to remove it. Remind them that video is there because of their driver, and the responsibility accrues to them. Let any bad publicity be an object lesson.

That said, it's reasonable to offer to publish their apology along the video.
!nataS pihsroW

Re: CycleCommute.CC blog
« Reply #7 on: March 28, 2019, 09:19:28 am »
Leave it there, you're under no obligation to remove it. Remind them that video is there because of their driver, and the responsibility accrues to them. Let any bad publicity be an object lesson.

That said, it's reasonable to offer to publish their apology along the video.
Thanks, that's pretty much what I was thinking as well. Will probably post a comment to acknowledge their apology and leave it at that.  :thumbsup:

fd3

Re: CycleCommute.CC blog
« Reply #8 on: March 30, 2019, 12:41:35 am »
Does anyone else keep track of how much their cycling costs? I've got a comparison running for this year to show how much it saves (hopefully) compared to driving and public transport. See here:

https://cyclecommute.cc/how-much
I've been keeping track for the last few years, where before I had an estimate of the costs.  Money I save not using public transport/car goes into paying for a roof over my head.
I think your car commute costs are a bit too generously low - you skipped VED, MOT, Insurance costs and your wear and tear costs may be what employers would pay on mileage but I think that's low for anything other than a recent model high-cost purchase.
Public transport, would it not be cheaper with a travel card of some sort?
[/I could be wrong]

Re: CycleCommute.CC blog
« Reply #9 on: March 30, 2019, 11:28:11 am »
Does anyone else keep track of how much their cycling costs? I've got a comparison running for this year to show how much it saves (hopefully) compared to driving and public transport. See here:

https://cyclecommute.cc/how-much
I've been keeping track for the last few years, where before I had an estimate of the costs.  Money I save not using public transport/car goes into paying for a roof over my head.
I think your car commute costs are a bit too generously low - you skipped VED, MOT, Insurance costs and your wear and tear costs may be what employers would pay on mileage but I think that's low for anything other than a recent model high-cost purchase.
Public transport, would it not be cheaper with a travel card of some sort?
I kind of agree on the car costs being a bit on the low side. However, I still need to keep the car so don't save on insurance, tax, mot, etc. although that might be different for others.

Public transport travel pass saves a little but when factoring in holidays there is not much, if anything, in it.

Anyone used Heatflask app with strava before? It gives a pretty cool summary of rides. I've put a bit on the blog about it :

https://cyclecommute.cc/2019/03/30/marching-on/

Re: CycleCommute.CC blog
« Reply #10 on: March 30, 2019, 12:38:13 pm »
You have included things that aren't really commute costs such as some cable cutters, a seat post, brake calipers, a new crankset. The two cassettes you have bought will last you at least two years given your mileage.  Same for cables. Wheel bearings do not need replacing once a year given your mileage.  So you are not going to see those costs again this year or even the next. Meanwhile for the car and bus you will see those costs climb linearly every month and for car jump significantly when it needs repairing as things break. So your chart is somewhat misleading and does not represent a yearly comparison.   

Re: CycleCommute.CC blog
« Reply #11 on: March 30, 2019, 01:35:44 pm »
You have included things that aren't really commute costs such as some cable cutters, a seat post, brake calipers, a new crankset. The two cassettes you have bought will last you at least two years given your mileage.  Same for cables. Wheel bearings do not need replacing once a year given your mileage.  So you are not going to see those costs again this year or even the next. Meanwhile for the car and bus you will see those costs climb linearly every month and for car jump significantly when it needs repairing as things break. So your chart is somewhat misleading and does not represent a yearly comparison.
Well they kind of are commute costs as I wouldn't be able to ride my bike to work if I didn't buy them! It's an annual comparison so I've included things that I need to buy throughout the year.

I wish the cassettes would last 2 years but I find 4-5000 miles is about the limit, and that's with regular cleaning.

fd3

Re: CycleCommute.CC blog
« Reply #12 on: March 30, 2019, 01:36:52 pm »
Since this is not a theoretical comparison as far as bike vs car goes, might it not make sense to ignore wear and tear for the car and actually add the repair costs that are required?  Then is would be a fair comparison bike vs car and you could see over time how the wtwo vary (with spikes for new seatposts, n+1 and retracking the wheels on your car).
[/I could be wrong]

Re: CycleCommute.CC blog
« Reply #13 on: March 30, 2019, 01:38:37 pm »
Since this is not a theoretical comparison as far as bike vs car goes, might it not make sense to ignore wear and tear for the car and actually add the repair costs that are required?  Then is would be a fair comparison bike vs car and you could see over time how the wtwo vary (with spikes for new seatposts, n+1 and retracking the wheels on your car).
But how would I do that given I don't drive to work?  ???

Re: CycleCommute.CC blog
« Reply #14 on: March 30, 2019, 01:46:51 pm »
Then you need to include MOT plus insurance for car else you would not be able to drive it to work.

Re: CycleCommute.CC blog
« Reply #15 on: March 30, 2019, 01:48:34 pm »
Then you need to include MOT plus insurance for car else you would not be able to drive it to work.
That's a fair point.  :thumbsup:

Re: CycleCommute.CC blog
« Reply #16 on: March 30, 2019, 01:50:16 pm »
Why did you replace seat post and cranks?

Re: CycleCommute.CC blog
« Reply #17 on: March 30, 2019, 01:59:29 pm »
Why did you replace seat post and cranks?
Seatpost was stuck in a frame and I had to chop it out.

Cracks were worn out.

fd3

Re: CycleCommute.CC blog
« Reply #18 on: March 30, 2019, 09:38:29 pm »
Since this is not a theoretical comparison as far as bike vs car goes, might it not make sense to ignore wear and tear for the car and actually add the repair costs that are required?  Then is would be a fair comparison bike vs car and you could see over time how the wtwo vary (with spikes for new seatposts, n+1 and retracking the wheels on your car).
But how would I do that given I don't drive to work?  ???
Do you ride your bike outside of your commute?  If so, why are you charging your bike repairs to your commute and not a theoretical wear and tear rate?
Whichever way you cut it there will be room to disagree (which is fine), my opinion is that if you are going to factor in actual repair costs you might as well keep it the same for both modes of transport in order to compare oranges with other oranges.
For the last couple of years I have spent no more than £300 a year (NET) on my bike(s) and cycling (I include expensive gore one jackets in the list).  Last year my wife paid £400 on a repair to the car and about the same the year before.  She doesn't commute with the car but it is still more expensive annually than my cycling/commuting and that's without factoring in the cost for petrol.  If I got a (shudder) bus pass it would cost about £700 a year, or I could more and take the train.
While it is more clear-cut for me as I don't have a car, I am also including non-commuting costs in maintaining/fixing other bikes.
[/I could be wrong]

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: CycleCommute.CC blog
« Reply #19 on: March 30, 2019, 11:57:22 pm »
Stepping sideways from the car aspect for a minute, I found that once I re-discovered cycling for local transport, my shoes would wear at a vastly reduced[1] rate, as I was walking less far.  This was briefly offset by saddles destroying trousers, until I worked out that cycling-specific clothing (particularly the more presentable things like Endura Cruisers and MTB baggies) was a fair bit more robust in that department.

And then it's almost impossible to untangle the true costs of my transport cycling from my hobby cycling.  But I don't care, because most of what I spend on hobby cycling is returned in physical (and to a lesser extent mental) health benefits that are effectively priceless.

I find it easy to justify spending on things which give a tangible safety improvement.  Decent brakes; better lights; appropriate tyres.  A set of Marathon Winters isn't cheap, until you compare it to the cost of some new clothes and a couple of physiotherapy sessions, let alone time off work.

Lots of things to factor in...


[1] I have an unusual gait that wears shoes from the inside out, so sturdy soles don't really help.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...