Author Topic: Rebecca Twigg: The Kind of Follow Up You Never Want to Write  (Read 875 times)


Re: Rebecca Twigg: The Kind of Follow Up You Never Want to Write
« Reply #1 on: April 17, 2019, 08:11:52 am »
Seems a very sad story. There is a parallel to retired servicepeople; used to a particular organised environment, neither cope well outside of that environment.
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Re: Rebecca Twigg: The Kind of Follow Up You Never Want to Write
« Reply #2 on: April 17, 2019, 11:35:04 am »
Seems a very sad story. There is a parallel to retired servicepeople; used to a particular organised environment, neither cope well outside of that environment.

I'd agree with that, with the proviso that many in the military come from troubled backgrounds. There are other instances of top-flight racers from an unstable home background. It might be easier not to be homesick, if you haven't got a home.

Quote
Twigg was still a child when she became homeless.

A prodigy in academics and athletics, she started at UW at the age of 14, competing in cycling that same year and medaling in national races almost right away. At this time, she was living in Seattle in a basement with her mother and sister.

Twigg’s sister says their mom kicked Twigg out; Twigg remembers being offered the option to leave and taking it. She was a few months from turning 16. She rode her bike to the old downtown Greyhound station, stayed up all night, and slept a few hours in the UW Library the next morning before calling her team leader and crashing at his house. The next years — as Twigg became a cycling star — were transient. She went from friends’ houses to hotels on the road while racing.

Re: Rebecca Twigg: The Kind of Follow Up You Never Want to Write
« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2019, 07:31:24 am »
I remember seeing her ride at the Marymoor Park velodrome (suburb of Seattle).  No one could hold her wheel.