Author Topic: Confessions of a tool junkie  (Read 8230 times)

T42

  • Tea tank
Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #125 on: May 25, 2019, 04:06:21 pm »
Nipped over to the local DIY hole for some work gloves I need and came back with the gloves, a selection of bolts, nuts, washers and wing-nuts, then added one of those el cheapo angle grinders because, as somebody put it, at 12€90 why not plus a bunch of discs and a bill for 57€. Oh, missus went to and got some dog treats. Bloody expensive, dog treats.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

T42

  • Tea tank
Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #126 on: May 27, 2019, 08:27:10 am »
Re the el cheapo angle grinder: it works but (a) the return spring in the switch is so strong that it slides the untextured body out of my hand unless I pull back against it with the side handle, (b) it makes a racket to wake the dead and (c) the odour of ozone is impressive.  That may diminish as the brushes wear in.

I reckon this'll mostly serve to push me towards buying a decent one.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #127 on: May 27, 2019, 11:52:58 am »
Yes similar experience here. I have a big Makita angle grinder and a Powerline or some such cheapo little one. The Powerline is on borrowed time until it gets replaced by a Makita. Small decent angle grinders aren't that expensive. I replaced my old cheap 1/3 sheet sander with a Makita one last week, big improvement especially in noise levels and vibration !
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

T42

  • Tea tank
Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #128 on: May 27, 2019, 12:15:33 pm »
Mine was mostly a lock for the stable of a bolted horse: some of the piping we had to get through last Friday were hard to get at with a hacksaw. This one'll do for the next water-heater, in 15 years or so if I'm still around.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #129 on: June 09, 2019, 09:39:42 pm »
Yep. I have a tool problem. I have work tools. Upstairs tools. Downstairs tools. Shed 1 tools. Shed 2 tools. Oh and the garage.
Stropping rocks

T42

  • Tea tank
Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #130 on: June 10, 2019, 09:01:12 am »
Yep. I have a tool problem. I have work tools. Upstairs tools. Downstairs tools. Shed 1 tools. Shed 2 tools. Oh and the garage.

Crikey. I have workshop & house tools and a basic rule that if a workshop tool goes into the house then it goes back to the shop before the day's out.  The converse does not apply.

Meanwhile, anyone here got a plunge/track saw?  They look to be incredibly useful.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #131 on: June 10, 2019, 09:34:09 am »
A real one or a hankering for one?

With a decent skill saw along with sufficient clamps to create a guide it's hard to justify the cost or storage space. If I was doing it as a day job, it'd be a slam dunk.

CommuteTooFar

  • Inadequate Randonneur
Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #132 on: June 10, 2019, 10:04:36 am »
Before buying a track saw its worth having a look at the tracks available.

There are two issues.  Some tracks are usable by other brands of saw. Festool, Makita and I believe Evolution can run on each others tracks.
So with care you can buy cheaper tracks for your saw.

The cheapest saws Aldi/Lidl, Screwfix etc often come with very short tracks. So if your plan is to rip full size sheets you may need to join four sections of track.


Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #133 on: June 10, 2019, 12:22:13 pm »
I just learned that parallel action pliers are a thing and bought some because they look like they'll come in useful.

Wishing this had happened before I upgraded the potentiometers on my bench power supply (which involved a great deal of failing to hold M3 nuts and pinching my skin with with long-nose pliers while I did up the screw from the other side of the panel), but there you go...
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #134 on: June 10, 2019, 12:37:30 pm »
I just learned that parallel action pliers are a thing and bought some because they look like they'll come in useful.

Wishing this had happened before I upgraded the potentiometers on my bench power supply (which involved a great deal of failing to hold M3 nuts and pinching my skin with with long-nose pliers while I did up the screw from the other side of the panel), but there you go...
Most of them look quite cheap and nasty, but I think you'd be struggling produce something giving you parallel action from a conventional forged tool.

As far as parallel jaws go, this delightful tool  is a V.E.G. (Very expensive godsend)

I bought from Tourettes Tools in Fulham around 20 years ago.
Smooth jaws (so no marky), parallel action, can be locked off a la Mole Grips.
A delight to use - but I think they were something like 45 squid  :o

Great for universal spannering, with little risk of trashing the fastener.

They're currently my tool-of-choice for crimping cable end crimps.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #135 on: June 10, 2019, 12:50:17 pm »
They seem to mostly be a jewellery thing, which makes sense.  It's small stuff where they're likely to be more useful anyway.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

T42

  • Tea tank
Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #136 on: June 10, 2019, 01:08:23 pm »
A real one or a hankering for one?

With a decent skill saw along with sufficient clamps to create a guide it's hard to justify the cost or storage space. If I was doing it as a day job, it'd be a slam dunk.

Used to do the portable circular saw/clamp/lath bit before I got a decent table saw. Nowadays I just have a small table saw with a crappy fence. Track saw looks more precise.

Before buying a track saw its worth having a look at the tracks available.

There are two issues.  Some tracks are usable by other brands of saw. Festool, Makita and I believe Evolution can run on each others tracks.
So with care you can buy cheaper tracks for your saw.

The cheapest saws Aldi/Lidl, Screwfix etc often come with very short tracks. So if your plan is to rip full size sheets you may need to join four sections of track.



Yeah. I've been following Peter Millard's track-saw videos on YT where he compares various el cheapos with Festool. I don't reckon I'd ever need more than 2x70cm tracks. Aldi/Lidl saws are apparently rebadged Sheppach kit & Scheppach tracks are available separately, which is the other consideration with el cheapos.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #137 on: June 11, 2019, 02:32:07 am »
Most of them look quite cheap and nasty, but I think you'd be struggling produce something giving you parallel action from a conventional forged tool.

Knipex pliers wrenches come in a variety of sizes and are really high quality. Not cheap though.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/KNIPEX-pliers-wrench-chrome-plated-plastic-coated/dp/B000X4KP1C
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

T42

  • Tea tank
Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #138 on: June 11, 2019, 08:00:55 am »
Yup. I have a pair of Knipex C-clip spreaders and they're very nicely made. When El Prez did our water heater last month he had a complete Knipex electrician's tool bag - his retirement present.

Facom are pretty good too.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #139 on: June 11, 2019, 08:51:16 am »
Most of them look quite cheap and nasty, but I think you'd be struggling produce something giving you parallel action from a conventional forged tool.

Knipex pliers wrenches come in a variety of sizes and are really high quality. Not cheap though.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/KNIPEX-pliers-wrench-chrome-plated-plastic-coated/dp/B000X4KP1C

They're 'ver nice.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #140 on: June 11, 2019, 01:37:50 pm »
I have nothing bad to say about their wire cutters, particularly the Super Knips series.

I should probably get some of their wire strippers, but my preferred technique is to use really cheap ones with the locknut removed, so I can strip different diameters by feel.  Doing it properly would seem like faff.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #141 on: June 11, 2019, 02:02:11 pm »
I note with some disappointment that Lindstrom no longer produce their pliers / cutters with a box joint - A thing of beauty in itself.

T42

  • Tea tank
Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #142 on: June 11, 2019, 02:51:39 pm »
I have nothing bad to say about their wire cutters, particularly the Super Knips series.

I should probably get some of their wire strippers, but my preferred technique is to use really cheap ones with the locknut removed, so I can strip different diameters by feel.  Doing it properly would seem like faff.

I have one of these things:



Nice enough to use and not much to get wrong unless you put the wire in the wrong notch.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

bludger

  • Randonneur and bargain hunter
Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #143 on: June 11, 2019, 02:53:49 pm »


I don't need it. I don't need it. I don't need it. I don't need it. I don't need it.

https://www.planetx.co.uk/i/q/TOJOOMT/jobsworth-outdoor-multi-tool
YACF touring/audax bargain basement:
https://bit.ly/2Xg8pRD


Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #144 on: June 11, 2019, 02:57:36 pm »


I don't need it. I don't need it. I don't need it. I don't need it. I don't need it.

https://www.planetx.co.uk/i/q/TOJOOMT/jobsworth-outdoor-multi-tool
You're right. You don't need it.
The more you make use of the hammer and the axe, the less your wire cutters will cut wire.

T42

  • Tea tank
Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #145 on: June 18, 2019, 08:14:35 am »
I'm currently angling for a nail gun on the strength of needing to panel the hall where the dogs rub against it.  Strategy is (a) get nail gun (b) proclaim current air compressor inadequate (c) get new compressor (d) inflate dogs.

Part (a) duly accomplished: Rapid PB131 and a 7-metre air line.  Impressed: it bangs a 5 cm nail through 4.4 cm of pine as if it were hollow.  Compressor restarts after only 15 shots, though - noisy. Plan (b) duly initiated.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

Mr Larrington

  • A bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
  • Custard Wallah
    • Mr Larrington's Automatic Diary
Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #146 on: June 18, 2019, 01:08:01 pm »
Be sure to post pictures if things progress as far as (d).
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

T42

  • Tea tank
Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #147 on: June 18, 2019, 01:32:20 pm »
Cervantes would give us to believe that it is easier than writing a book...
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #148 on: June 18, 2019, 01:49:05 pm »
Had a good score at a car boot sale on Sunday. Stanley Yankee spiral screwdriver in really nice condition. These are great tools but the choice of bits is limited and they are never with the screwdriver.
You can buy an adaptor that lets them use modern hex bits but is either cheap Chinesium or expensive and German.  This one came complete with a German adaptor and all the whole thing was only £4 !

I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

T42

  • Tea tank
Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #149 on: June 18, 2019, 02:58:58 pm »
Those used to be the bee's knees in the Sixties.  I still have mine, and I inherited the Inlaw Paw's, which is enormous.  I never much liked them because you had to press like buggery and if you slipped off the screw the bit cut into the workpiece with your thrust and that of the spring combined.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.