Author Topic: Removing oven  (Read 1431 times)

Re: Removing oven
« Reply #25 on: June 11, 2019, 08:43:26 am »
My kitchen (installed by MFI in 2005 based on the paperwork we got when we bought the flat in 2007) has a single oven on a normal 13A plug that connects in to a normal socket. No separate isolation switch. I think it's on the same ring as the rest of the kitchen (so that includes a toaster, kettle, microwave, dishwasher, washing machine, fridge/freezer). In 2005 this was all within the regs I guess (who knows, MFI might have used dodgy installers).

I replaced the oven a few years ago, like for like, and wired it in to a plug in exactly the same way. I made sure I selected an oven that was rated at less than 13A because of this obviously.

The above (and the fact that the flat is wired with only 4 circuits, no RCDs/etc) is the main reason I want to get the place rewired[1], but the electricians we've had look at it have said that there's no urgent need to get it done, the cables themselves are in good shape (i.e. not ancient cotton covered things that get chewed by rats), the fuses are correct and the loads on each of the circuits aren't anywhere near capacity.

1. We're sticking money away for this each month as the rewiring itself is cheap compared to the redecoration costs (especially with replacement carpets, and other 'upgrades' that it would make sense to do at the same time).
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Re: Removing oven
« Reply #26 on: June 11, 2019, 08:57:12 am »
Turn the gas off at the meter, unplug the bayonet fitting, turn the gas on, check for leaks with washing-up liquid (even small amounts of leaking gas will form bubbles), and if in doubt turn the gas back off and phone a gas man...

If there's a leak you'll probably smell it - assuming a fully functioning sense of smell of course.  Recently I got home, opened the front door, and immediately said "gas" to my wife.  We have no gas inside the house. The leak was from a small perforation* of the (externally run) gas supply pipe to the (externally housed) boiler. The pipe runs under the cill of the back door, which is 30ft from the front.  I was amazed at how pungent the smell was.

*The plumber who installed the boiler about 10 years ago had run the condensate pipe out along the incoming gas line, and terminated it just above ground level. The condensate had over the years corroded the gas pipe, leading the the pinhole leak.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Removing oven
« Reply #27 on: June 11, 2019, 12:36:24 pm »
If there's a leak you'll probably smell it - assuming a fully functioning sense of smell of course.  Recently I got home, opened the front door, and immediately said "gas" to my wife.  We have no gas inside the house. The leak was from a small perforation* of the (externally run) gas supply pipe to the (externally housed) boiler. The pipe runs under the cill of the back door, which is 30ft from the front.  I was amazed at how pungent the smell was.

I spent much of my childhood telling my grandparents that there was a gas leak in their pantry.  "Nonsense," they'd say "there's no gas in this house.".  Apart from the capped-off piping in the pantry where the gas meter used to be, of course.

Eventually a man smelled it, and they got the gas board in to sort it out.


I trust my sense of smell, but experience has taught me not to trust other people's.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...