Author Topic: Removing oven  (Read 1509 times)

velosam

  • '.....you used to be an apple on a stick.'
Removing oven
« on: May 03, 2019, 10:34:04 am »
I need to remove my old oven as I have managed to buy one on a trade in deal.

How difficult is it to remove the old oven and how would I make sure it was safe?

thanks

sam

Tim Hall

  • I want to eat the fleeting shade of your lashes
Re: Removing oven
« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2019, 10:38:57 am »
A few more details are needed.

Gas? Electric? Other? 

Built in? Free standing?
There are two ways you can get exercise out of a bicycle: you can
"overhaul" it, or you can ride it.  (Jerome K Jerome)

Re: Removing oven
« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2019, 10:42:19 am »
Also, how old?
I recently exchanged my 20+ yo cooker for my sister's 3yo one (she was having a ceramic hob fitted).
The old cooker was ~ twice the weight of the new one. Two of us struggled to move it.

Re: Removing oven
« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2019, 11:15:08 am »
If it is a cabinet housing the opening size may be slightly different and have to be amended. I got over this last time  by inserting a new shelf on blocks in reducing the opening size and obtaining a piece of black perpsex from a local signage company, then having it  cut to size, drilled, countersunk and chamfered etc in a joiners shop.

If so mounted and a double oven, sliding out the old one is a two person job really as above.
Freestanding oven have to be secured to the wall nowadays, existing gas bayonet fittings are a no no for new cookers.
Get a bicycle. You will never regret it, if you live- Mark Twain

Re: Removing oven
« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2019, 11:27:33 am »
Freestanding oven have to be secured to the wall nowadays,

Why ? I can see a reason if its a gas cooker but electric ?
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

Re: Removing oven
« Reply #5 on: May 03, 2019, 11:34:44 am »
Sorry, is a  Gas regs requirement but would recommend for electric as well to prevent appliance tipping over. Screwfix sell kits for less than £3.
Get a bicycle. You will never regret it, if you live- Mark Twain

Re: Removing oven
« Reply #6 on: May 03, 2019, 11:38:15 am »
It's ridiculous regs as usual. My 100kg plus range cooker needs securing to the wall. I doubt I could pull it over if I climbed on it.

If it's gas remember

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Removing oven
« Reply #7 on: May 03, 2019, 02:02:04 pm »
I assume this is "secured to the wall" in the safety chain that's shorter than the gas pipe sense?  In which case, eminently sensible and no drama.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Re: Removing oven
« Reply #8 on: May 03, 2019, 06:33:02 pm »
In our last house we had a range cooker / boiler. I don't know what it weighed but the latest version is 395 kg.

I suppose that strapping it to the wall of the timber-framed house would have helped to keep the wall in place in case of an explosion or a hurricane.
Quote from: Kim
Paging Diver300.  Diver300 to the GSM Trimphone, please...

Re: Removing oven
« Reply #9 on: May 04, 2019, 11:21:50 am »
I assume this is "secured to the wall" in the safety chain that's shorter than the gas pipe sense?  In which case, eminently sensible and no drama.

Which I think has been a thing for many years.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

velosam

  • '.....you used to be an apple on a stick.'
Re: Removing oven
« Reply #10 on: May 20, 2019, 06:57:25 pm »
It’s a single gas oven about 20 years old

Re: Removing oven
« Reply #11 on: May 20, 2019, 07:51:37 pm »
It should have a fixed pipe on the wall, and a flexible hose on the stove with a push and twist bayonet fitting on the end, a bit like a light bulb fitting. Disconnecting it - push, turn, pull - will seal the pipe on the wall. It may also have an electrical connection for lights, timer etc. 
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

velosam

  • '.....you used to be an apple on a stick.'
Re: Removing oven
« Reply #12 on: May 23, 2019, 09:27:30 am »
Thanks will have a go at sliding it out -

velosam

  • '.....you used to be an apple on a stick.'
Re: Removing oven
« Reply #13 on: June 10, 2019, 02:00:45 pm »
I pulled out the oven.

The issue is more with the electrical fittings as the unit is wired in.

The gas has a separate tap and I can probably pull those out.

I am assuming that if I am fitting an electric oven and stuff I can leave the gas pipe there with the tap off?

Re: Removing oven
« Reply #14 on: June 10, 2019, 07:11:20 pm »
Yes you can leave it.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

caerau

  • SR x 3 - PBP fail but 1090 km - hey - not too bad
Re: Removing oven
« Reply #15 on: June 10, 2019, 07:25:24 pm »

How difficult is it to remove the old oven and how would I make sure it was safe?



As far as I am aware it's pretty much illegal these days to work on electrics or gas like this without being a Corgi* registered gas-person or the equivalent registered electrician's body


You may not care about that of course, but your insurance company might etc.  later on, or if you're trying to sell the house or whatever.


Just saying ;). I appreciate this might not be the most popular option in this forum - i.e. to get someone in.




* if they still call it that.
It's a reverse Elvis thing.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Removing oven
« Reply #16 on: June 10, 2019, 07:30:42 pm »
I think what was CORGI became GasSafe.

Re: Removing oven
« Reply #17 on: June 10, 2019, 07:37:53 pm »

How difficult is it to remove the old oven and how would I make sure it was safe?



As far as I am aware it's pretty much illegal these days to work on electrics or gas like this without being a Corgi* registered gas-person or the equivalent registered electrician's body


You may not care about that of course, but your insurance company might etc.  later on, or if you're trying to sell the house or whatever.


Just saying ;). I appreciate this might not be the most popular option in this forum - i.e. to get someone in.




* if they still call it that.

The gas connection will be a safe-break seal type, can just be left. And as long as all you’re doing is connecting a new oven to an existing junction box / switch you’re all legal. Running new supplies in from the consumer unit needs (legally at least) a registered professional.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Removing oven
« Reply #18 on: June 10, 2019, 08:09:41 pm »
I think what was CORGI became GasSafe.

It's worse than that, it's a different organisation that won the contract for being in charge of gas safety for a bit.  Because obviously what the public needs is to learn a new name for approved gas fitters.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Re: Removing oven
« Reply #19 on: June 10, 2019, 08:25:24 pm »
Yes I never understood the total lack of understanding of the power of branding and its importance (in terms of safety) of fixing a name in the mind of the public, exhibited by the people who run these things. People just get used to the idea that a gas fitter/installer needs to be Corgi registered and how to check this and then they change the bloody thing.  And.... personally I would want the gas supply capped, but that's me.
Get a bicycle. You will never regret it, if you live- Mark Twain

Re: Removing oven
« Reply #20 on: June 10, 2019, 10:43:57 pm »

How difficult is it to remove the old oven and how would I make sure it was safe?

As far as I am aware it's pretty much illegal these days to work on [...] gas like this without being a Corgi* registered gas-person

AIUI, the bayonet gas fittings are specifically designed to let any muppet disconnect and reconnect appliances without any need to GALMI1.

More to the point, the regs about needing GasSafe registration only apply if you're working on gas for money - the only legal requirement to work on gas on your own behalf or as a favour to someone is that you must be 'competent.'

(Of course, the legislation doesn't do anything so helpful as define the term 'competent,' and it's only likely to be tested after the fact: if your new boiler installation has taken out half the street, it's quite probable that the courts will find you didn't meet the test. That said, it's probably a plausible rule of thumb that if you're asking for gas safety tips on a cycling forum, you should assume that you don't clear the bar.)



1: Get A Little Man In. A classist, sexist acronym that deserves a wider audience.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Removing oven
« Reply #21 on: June 10, 2019, 11:13:17 pm »
Turn the gas off at the meter, unplug the bayonet fitting, turn the gas on, check for leaks with washing-up liquid (even small amounts of leaking gas will form bubbles), and if in doubt turn the gas back off and phone a gas man...

Electrickery's easier, as it tends not to leak out of stuff.  If the oven's hard-wired, turn the power off, disconnect the cable from the isolator switch, maybe fit a grommet or something to fill the hole if live stuff would otherwise be exposed, job done.  No need for any kind of certification to replace an existing fitting, and disconnecting an oven surely qualifies.

But sure, if any of this seems scary, GAMI.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Re: Removing oven
« Reply #22 on: June 10, 2019, 11:27:22 pm »
It depends on the amperage of the new oven - if it’s a cheapo 2000W single oven it ought to work fine with whatever’s there*. If it’s a monster double oven with self cleaning that draws lots o’amps then you kind of need someone that knows what they’re doing.

(* assuming whatever’s there was competently installed - which is a very big if)

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Removing oven
« Reply #23 on: June 10, 2019, 11:37:07 pm »
Yes, that's true.  But the question was about removing one.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Re: Removing oven
« Reply #24 on: June 10, 2019, 11:53:32 pm »
I thought all UK cooker circuits were installed as a dedicated 32 Amp circuit using 6mm cable and a remote on/off switch above the counter top ? I know some cookers might not need that but the point is the next one might. You can have a normal 13 amp socket on this circuit as well to plug a cooker in that uses a 13 amp plug.
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.