Author Topic: Pavement parking  (Read 3529 times)

Re: Pavement parking
« Reply #50 on: May 22, 2019, 11:15:03 pm »
Cars are a gas that expands to fill all available space.

Re: Pavement parking
« Reply #51 on: May 22, 2019, 11:19:06 pm »
How about this? (I think he likes cars...) [Note that some of the pavement parking there is legal as it is in signed marked bays on the pavement, but not all of those cars are in marked bays.]

https://goo.gl/maps/WEgjaLbNbrrR92gT8

and my other favourite (on my run that goes the other way) is the half on pavement half on road disabled parking spot with a useful pole all but stopping its use:-

https://goo.gl/maps/gZmLyAQqvXhzdff49
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

ian

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    • The Suburban Survival Guide
Re: Pavement parking
« Reply #52 on: May 23, 2019, 09:19:55 am »
There's another batch of houses near ours where they have garages, but they park their cars halfway in and out (presumably because the end of the garage is filled with other stuff). So the rear end of the car blocks the pavement to the road. Now you could, of course, walk out into the road, and make a small detail around them. Or rather you can't, because that's where the park their other cars.

Cars will indeed expand to fill all available space be it road or parking. And given a clear lack of parking, it strangely doesn't stop people buying even bigger cars and then complaining they're nowhere to park and someone needs to do something. That someone not being them. The main regulator of parking at the narrow overparked street at the bottom of ours is the bin lorry/wing mirror removal machine.
!nataS pihsroW

caerau

  • SR x 3 - PBP fail but 1090 km - hey - not too bad
Re: Pavement parking
« Reply #53 on: May 23, 2019, 09:41:09 am »

https://goo.gl/maps/gZmLyAQqvXhzdff49


They must have seconded the supremo of Bike Lane design to come up with that one  :-D
It's a reverse Elvis thing.

caerau

  • SR x 3 - PBP fail but 1090 km - hey - not too bad
Re: Pavement parking
« Reply #54 on: May 23, 2019, 09:42:55 am »
There's another batch of houses near ours where they have garages, but they park their cars halfway in and out (presumably because the end of the garage is filled with other stuff). So the rear end of the car blocks the pavement to the road. Now you could, of course, walk out into the road, and make a small detail around them. Or rather you can't, because that's where the park their other cars.

Cars will indeed expand to fill all available space be it road or parking. And given a clear lack of parking, it strangely doesn't stop people buying even bigger cars and then complaining they're nowhere to park and someone needs to do something. That someone not being them. The main regulator of parking at the narrow overparked street at the bottom of ours is the bin lorry/wing mirror removal machine.


Cars actually *in* garages?   :jurek:   On my street it is de-rigeur to convert the garage into another living room - or perhaps a play-den for the kids.
It's a reverse Elvis thing.

Tim Hall

  • I want to eat the fleeting shade of your lashes
Re: Pavement parking
« Reply #55 on: May 23, 2019, 09:51:03 am »
There's another batch of houses near ours where they have garages, but they park their cars halfway in and out (presumably because the end of the garage is filled with other stuff). So the rear end of the car blocks the pavement to the road. Now you could, of course, walk out into the road, and make a small detail around them. Or rather you can't, because that's where the park their other cars.

Cars will indeed expand to fill all available space be it road or parking. And given a clear lack of parking, it strangely doesn't stop people buying even bigger cars and then complaining they're nowhere to park and someone needs to do something. That someone not being them. The main regulator of parking at the narrow overparked street at the bottom of ours is the bin lorry/wing mirror removal machine.


Cars actually *in* garages?   :jurek:   On my street it is de-rigeur to convert the garage into another living room - or perhaps a play-den for the kids.

A couple of years ago I was perusing, for work purposes, the planning application for a small (dozen or so) housing developments. One of the planning conditions was that garages were to be used for cars. I presume they meant "so don't think about converting into another room" rather than "don't fill with bicycles".
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caerau

  • SR x 3 - PBP fail but 1090 km - hey - not too bad
Re: Pavement parking
« Reply #56 on: May 23, 2019, 10:01:55 am »
One thing I do rather like about the new housing developments around us in Cardiff is that they seem to deliberately build them with nowhere near enough space for cars.  My road being an example, we've all got garages (or did at least in most cases) and a driveway with space for 1 car but the road itself is far too narrow for parking - really even with the car almost fully on the pavement.


Doesn't stop a few people still trying to fit 4 wankpanzers around the area per-household but mostly it really does limit the number of cars they can physically possess.  I approve.


I even saw one resident on facebook complaining to my old landlord (a local councillor and Welsh assembly member of some notoriety).  His response was a terse - 'do you really think we need more cars on the road?'   :thumbsup:
It's a reverse Elvis thing.

Pingu

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Re: Pavement parking
« Reply #57 on: May 23, 2019, 10:08:18 am »
Bin parking is a problem. Not every neighbourhood has gardens. The large public bin system works okay where everyone has access to the appropriate bin, but IME that's not always the case. It also reduces the efficiency of recycling, as communal bin, communal recycling tends to equal no one's responsibility. Those obviously are waste disposal and collection problems though, rather than pavement blocks. Bin bags, where they're still used, can be just as cloggy of pavements; although they're usually smaller, they're more untidy and can take up more pavement area. Plus: foxes.

I well remember the state of the streets here on bin day before the introduction of wheelie bins and large communal bins. Only it was seagulls rather than foxes that made most of the mess.

Regulator

  • That's Councillor Regulator to you...
Re: Pavement parking
« Reply #58 on: May 23, 2019, 10:27:04 am »
There's another batch of houses near ours where they have garages, but they park their cars halfway in and out (presumably because the end of the garage is filled with other stuff). So the rear end of the car blocks the pavement to the road. Now you could, of course, walk out into the road, and make a small detail around them. Or rather you can't, because that's where the park their other cars.

Cars will indeed expand to fill all available space be it road or parking. And given a clear lack of parking, it strangely doesn't stop people buying even bigger cars and then complaining they're nowhere to park and someone needs to do something. That someone not being them. The main regulator of parking at the narrow overparked street at the bottom of ours is the bin lorry/wing mirror removal machine.


Cars actually *in* garages?   :jurek:   On my street it is de-rigeur to convert the garage into another living room - or perhaps a play-den for the kids.

A couple of years ago I was perusing, for work purposes, the planning application for a small (dozen or so) housing developments. One of the planning conditions was that garages were to be used for cars. I presume they meant "so don't think about converting into another room" rather than "don't fill with bicycles".

Major developments around here normally carry a requirement for off road parking - and cycle parking.

I'm now sitting on the local planning committee.  We've just rejected a new major redevelopment of a brownfield site as there would be insufficient parking provided, which would adversely impact on surrounding residential areas... and there was insufficient cycle parking.
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ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
Re: Pavement parking
« Reply #59 on: May 23, 2019, 11:36:50 am »
That's the constant planning fight where I live, there's rarely enough off-street parking but the default would be to stop every development. Realistically any development puts more pressure on the already exhausted on-street parking. I don't think anyone in Surrey has heard of cycling (to be fair, we're on the North Downs, so you've pretty much got to have legs of steel if you plan to cycle, but I hear there are flat bits of Surrey).

I've told the story of the last place we lived, small gated private development of 12 four-bed houses, one parking space each plus a half-dozen guest spaces. The only way we could stop constant stupid parking was to physically block it with large planters with trees in. I mean, you've got four cars so you buy a house with one parking space? If you had four kids, you'd probably think twice about buying a one-bedroom house.

Cars actually *in* garages?   :jurek:   On my street it is de-rigeur to convert the garage into another living room - or perhaps a play-den for the kids.

Actually, thinking again of the houses in question, only one does this, the others have garages set back enough that they use the space in front plus the pavement as a 'driveway.'

Our garage is full of bicycles and Ikea furniture – my wife has hatched a grand plan to turn it into a gym, which I'll leave to her. But we have two (ish), there's a 'tunnel' under the house where the car lives.
!nataS pihsroW

caerau

  • SR x 3 - PBP fail but 1090 km - hey - not too bad
Re: Pavement parking
« Reply #60 on: May 23, 2019, 12:30:13 pm »
I think those of us in this forum with garages have a mutually common garage-use policy ;)
It's a reverse Elvis thing.

Re: Pavement parking
« Reply #61 on: May 23, 2019, 02:25:03 pm »
There's another batch of houses near ours where they have garages, but they park their cars halfway in and out (presumably because the end of the garage is filled with other stuff). So the rear end of the car blocks the pavement to the road. Now you could, of course, walk out into the road, and make a small detail around them. Or rather you can't, because that's where the park their other cars.


Cars actually *in* garages?   :jurek:   On my street it is de-rigeur to convert the garage into another living room - or perhaps a play-den for the kids.

Seems that people around here leave £30,000 - £50,000 cars out in the street all the time and use their garages to store a few hundred quids worth of junk. Don't know anyone in our street who uses their garage to store their car. Us included but we have the excuse of having a garage full of bikes
Hear all, see all, say nowt

Re: Pavement parking
« Reply #62 on: May 23, 2019, 02:42:15 pm »
It's been pointed out before that with the increase in size of modern cars they no longer fit into an oldish garage. My garage is late 60s vintage and while I could probably just get the Honda Civic in there I wouldn't be able to open the doors far enough to get out of it. Hence car on driveway and garage contains bikes lawn mower and a kayak. I think there is only one garage in the street that contains a car and that is the guy who owns a WW2 Jeep. A rather smaller vehicle than it's current namesake.
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Re: Pavement parking
« Reply #63 on: May 23, 2019, 03:03:20 pm »
There is also the planning not being entirely truthful. A few years ago they demolished all the garages behind my mums house and built more houses. The garages were not much used but this was because they hadn't been allowing hire for a few years ahead of the plans being submitted. Objections were raised and rejected on parking. The new houses get one dedicated space with a bollard but they all have several cars and obviously the previous spaces and garage are gone so every bit of path or grass that can have a car on does. The whole estate is like that with open areas either tarmaced or just allowing parking on grass

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Pavement parking
« Reply #64 on: May 23, 2019, 03:16:52 pm »
... or just allowing parking on grass
Something I first noticed way back in the 90s was in some estates, all the grass is actually concrete. That is, it's grass but it's growing through a concrete grid. Presumably to stop it getting churned up by car wheels, but it also makes it very difficult to walk on.
sideways bounding monkey lounging under fruit tree

Re: Pavement parking
« Reply #65 on: May 23, 2019, 03:46:58 pm »
Nah its proper old skool grass, well it was is mostly mud these days.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Pavement parking
« Reply #66 on: May 23, 2019, 05:00:05 pm »
... or just allowing parking on grass
Something I first noticed way back in the 90s was in some estates, all the grass is actually concrete. That is, it's grass but it's growing through a concrete grid. Presumably to stop it getting churned up by car wheels, but it also makes it very difficult to walk on.

I think that's called Grasscrete. I suppose it's more robust than ordinary turf. I think it's also used on camping sites, which is a pain if you're using tent pegs.

ian

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Re: Pavement parking
« Reply #67 on: May 23, 2019, 06:45:41 pm »
It stops the ground turning into a muddy morass when it's wet, though I suspect it's more intended for drivers' convenience in ensuring they don't get stuck.

It's depressing that every vacant space is considered as little more than potential car parking. First we let people concrete or tarmac their front garden, then we let them park in front, then we let them use any available pavement, and still hand over road space. And if that isn't enough, they'll take any available green space too. Of course, drivers' rights trump everything else. We couldn't possibly inconvenience them in any way.
!nataS pihsroW

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Pavement parking
« Reply #68 on: May 23, 2019, 07:23:03 pm »
... or just allowing parking on grass
Something I first noticed way back in the 90s was in some estates, all the grass is actually concrete. That is, it's grass but it's growing through a concrete grid. Presumably to stop it getting churned up by car wheels, but it also makes it very difficult to walk on.

I think that's called Grasscrete. I suppose it's more robust than ordinary turf. I think it's also used on camping sites, which is a pain if you're using tent pegs.

I think the original idea behind that stuff was to avoid the need for a proper tarmac/concrete/gravel surface on an infrequently-used access road.  So you can have grass around the back of your building but still get a fire engine through, or not have to maintain a proper road just to get a lorry to your transmitter site every few years, or whatever.

I've seen it used to good effect on campsites near the entrance to a field, to stop it turning into a quagmire from people driving vehicles over the same patch.  It's not exactly brilliant to ride a bike over.  Not yet had to pitch a tent on it, thobut.
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arabella

  • no se porque yo no lo se
Re: Pavement parking
« Reply #69 on: May 23, 2019, 09:35:12 pm »
... Of course, drivers' rights trump everything else. We couldn't possibly inconvenience them in any way.
I mused on this as I ambled along to vote this evening - once upon a time pedestrians going 'straight on' had right of way over cars turning across them into the side road.  Nowadays they just hurry in 'cos they couldn't possibly inconvenience any diver that might be behind.  It's OK to force the pedestrian to jump back onto the pavement though, you only get rights once you're in a motorcar.
In the dark, all views are the same.

Re: Pavement parking
« Reply #70 on: May 23, 2019, 09:52:43 pm »
I belive pedestrians still do have row across side roads. My driving instructor said no one knew that and pretty much planned on getting run over and using the compensation as a pension.... I don't think he really meant it.

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
Re: Pavement parking
« Reply #71 on: May 23, 2019, 10:39:18 pm »
They do. Though you wouldn't know from the way most people drive. For some reason even basic courtesy evaporates once you move at a speed beyond that of walking pace.
!nataS pihsroW

caerau

  • SR x 3 - PBP fail but 1090 km - hey - not too bad
Re: Pavement parking
« Reply #72 on: May 24, 2019, 07:39:24 am »
It stops the ground turning into a muddy morass when it's wet, though I suspect it's more intended for drivers' convenience in ensuring they don't get stuck.



When I was at school, I'm pretty sure they'd have made us play rugby on it if we'd had some.
It's a reverse Elvis thing.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Pavement parking
« Reply #73 on: May 24, 2019, 07:57:11 am »
... or just allowing parking on grass
Something I first noticed way back in the 90s was in some estates, all the grass is actually concrete. That is, it's grass but it's growing through a concrete grid. Presumably to stop it getting churned up by car wheels, but it also makes it very difficult to walk on.

I think that's called Grasscrete. I suppose it's more robust than ordinary turf. I think it's also used on camping sites, which is a pain if you're using tent pegs.
I didn't know the name but google shows that's what it is. It would be a pain in the arse, literally, along with all other body parts, to camp on, never mind tent pegs.
sideways bounding monkey lounging under fruit tree

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Pavement parking
« Reply #74 on: May 24, 2019, 07:59:53 am »
They do. Though you wouldn't know from the way most people drive. For some reason even basic courtesy evaporates once you move at a speed beyond that of walking pace.
Rule 170, at least in my copy.
Quote
Take extra care at junctions. You should watch out for pedestrians crossing a road into which you are turning. If they have started to cross they have priority, so give way.
Weak rule even if it were acknowledged.
sideways bounding monkey lounging under fruit tree