Author Topic: British cities quiz  (Read 384 times)

Wowbagger

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Jaded

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Re: British cities quiz
« Reply #1 on: May 25, 2019, 08:26:48 pm »
I got 10, without really trying.

I'm surprised you have heard of "InterCity" Wow!
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Wowbagger

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Re: British cities quiz
« Reply #2 on: May 25, 2019, 08:38:47 pm »
I remember the change from corridor trains. In some ways I preferred them.

Curiously, when we travelled back from Salzburg last year, the carriages in second class were very luxurious, and they were hybrid. Half of the carriage we were in had the layout of old-fashioned corridor trains, the other half like inter-city, but they seemed more swish. The advantage of the corridor-with-compartment bits becomes obvious when a family with young children, who are quite likely to become fractious on a >6 hour journey (we were on that train from Salzburg to Frankfurt-am-Main, ie between 9.45 am and 4pm) although it started in Bishofshofen and finished in Erfurt. I've no idea how many changes of crew it had in that time.
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Cudzoziemiec

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Re: British cities quiz
« Reply #3 on: May 25, 2019, 08:48:49 pm »
Corridor trains had some advantages, as Wow says, also the corridor could be used for privacy and/or sociability. And a compartment journey meant you were sharing that space with the other passengers and interacted with them in a way you don't when it's open plan. Equally, the disadvantages – you could find yourself stuck in that compartment with the fractious kids or the talkative weirdo or the one who never stops farting or the skinsuit wearer returning from a 3-day audax. From the railways pov, the open plan carriages carry more people in the same area and I expect are cheaper to build.

I didn't recognize all the cities but it was at least as much a test of logic with basic geographical knowledge (which of these places would have been served by the LMS? which one is by the sea?) as recognition.
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Basil

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Re: British cities quiz
« Reply #4 on: May 25, 2019, 09:21:54 pm »
Only 9. Didn't do well at the beginning, until I realised that it was always the obvious choice.
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Karla

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Re: British cities quiz
« Reply #5 on: May 25, 2019, 10:24:04 pm »
13 for me.  A couple of slightly lucky guesses but it helped to know the cathedrals and the local terrain (it ain't going to be Norwich if there are hills in the background), and in one case the Grain hadn't blanked out the rail company, which helped exclude some options.

Giraffe

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Re: British cities quiz
« Reply #6 on: May 26, 2019, 06:11:11 am »
Rather amused by one of the choices for no. 13 being that ancient cathedral city of Milton Keynes.
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Torslanda

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Re: British cities quiz
« Reply #7 on: May 26, 2019, 11:41:22 pm »
Rather amused by one of the choices for no. 13 being that ancient cathedral city of Milton Keynes.

Is it aimed at russian 'tourists'...?
VELOMANCER

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