Author Topic: Sourdough bread baking  (Read 1692 times)

Tim Hall

  • I want to eat the fleeting shade of your lashes
Re: Sourdough bread baking
« Reply #25 on: January 14, 2020, 07:02:08 pm »
Revisiting this. My last couple of loaves have been of the collapsy spready out sort.  Am I right in assuming there's too much water in the dough?

My recipe calls for 500g flour, 350g starter,  225ml water, bit of salt.
Mix then knead for 10-15 minutes.
Prove for 2-3 hours
Knock back, put in banneton.
Prove for 7 hours.
Tip onto hot baking sheet,  bake for 30 minutes.

When I tip it out it (a) sticks in the (floured) banneton then (b) spreads out on the baking sheet. The sticking means it doesn't flop out if the banneton quickly but rather oozes.  This doesn't help with the shape. The amount of water in the starter is a bit variable, due to inaccurate feeding. I've tinkered with the amount of water used  adding only 190ml last time. Comments?
There are two ways you can get exercise out of a bicycle: you can
"overhaul" it, or you can ride it.  (Jerome K Jerome)

Re: Sourdough bread baking
« Reply #26 on: January 15, 2020, 01:21:40 pm »
utes.

When I tip it out it (a) sticks in the (floured) banneton then (b) spreads out on the baking sheet.

The sticking is an issue - I fixed this with my banneton by gently misting the banneton with water, covering in rice flour and leaving for 24hr. This forms a nice layer of flour and reduces sticking, altho I still flour each time I want to use it. I've had best success with rice flour, wheat flour absorbs moisture and gets sticky. Some people also say you can use corn flour (polenta?) but I've not tried that.

Secondly, I've found it's important to get the shaping right before putting it in the baneton. This forms a nice surface tension on the dough which helps hold it together. Over-prooving can also mean that the dough looses some structure and is more likely to spread out, so make sure your long prove is somewhere cool.

Finally, I've found I get best success using an old cast-iron casserole dish as a dutch oven. This helps stop it spreading out so much, and means it bakes in a moist environment. Failing that, a stone will probably give better results than a baking sheet.

The amount of water looks OK to me.

Tim Hall

  • I want to eat the fleeting shade of your lashes
Re: Sourdough bread baking
« Reply #27 on: Yesterday at 05:54:30 pm »
Reporting back. Made sure the banneton had no remnants of the previous loaf. Gave it a good dusting with rye flour. Proved the dough for 2.5 hours, knocked it back then proved for 5.5 hours. It rose nicely ( my kitchen is fairly warm  about 20C) but wasn't over proved - it was above the top of the banneton in the centre but had a bit of space at the edges. Nice spring back when poked with a finger.  In the words of George Formby,  it turned out nice. No sticking, no spreading out on the baking sheet. Held shape in the oven and rose a  it. Probably my best loaf yet.
There are two ways you can get exercise out of a bicycle: you can
"overhaul" it, or you can ride it.  (Jerome K Jerome)