Author Topic: Audible warning was :Re: Pedestrian on the phone  (Read 2765 times)

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Audible warning was :Re: Pedestrian on the phone
« on: June 18, 2019, 08:11:51 pm »
ETA: Also, as has been mentioned elsewhere - so tell me if I am wrong - but anyone riding a bike fitted with an airhorn has an attitude of the cuntish variety.
Am I wrong?

I don't know.

Bells don't really penetrate the urban soundscape/closed car window/headphones.

While I've never had an airhorn myself, I don't think those wo use them a necessarily cuntish. It depends on how and when the horn is sounded.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Audible warning was :Re: Pedestrian on the phone
« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2019, 08:15:06 pm »
The only cyclist I know with an airhorn is not so much cuntish as (in an objective way) mentally impaired. The effect can be similar but the intention is different.
A cup of tea is the perfect bridge between real life and cake.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Audible warning was :Re: Pedestrian on the phone
« Reply #2 on: June 18, 2019, 08:31:09 pm »
Never seen the point.  Bells work 66% of the time[1] on shared paths.  Incoherent yelping is all I have time for for alerting lemming pedestrians, though the Koolstop squeal often helps.

Presumably the benefit of an airhorn is that motorists are more likely to hear it.  I'm not sure how helpful that is, as assuming they realise that horn noise is coming from the bike, you don't want to rely on them reacting appropriately for your safety.  At which point it's only useful as a means of escalating conflict after an incident.

The velomobileists tend to have electric horns.  I can imagine they're slightly more useful when a bell would be muffled, and you're moving at a speed that people don't necessarily expect.

The only cyclist I know with an airhorn is a full-on Captain Dashboard type, with a bike adorned with all sorts of homebrew visibility enhancements.  He seems to ensure this gets regular testing by means of some highly dubious road positioning.


[1] On the basis that a third of the time they work as intended, a third of the time they're misinterpreted as "GETOUTOFMYFUCKINGWAYBLOODYCYCLISTCOMINGTHROUGH", and the rest of the time they're not heard.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Basil

  • Um....err......oh bugger!
  • Help me!
Re: Audible warning was :Re: Pedestrian on the phone
« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2019, 08:43:43 pm »
Might have mentioned before.  Years ago I had an Airzound (?) ,possibly early 90s?
Bloke gave me full horn and punishment pass. I caught up at the lights and gave him a full blast straight at him through his open window, which I immediately regretted. 
I really thought he was having a heart attack.

Got rid of it.
Quote from: Kim
And remember that friends who organise things on Facebook aren't proper friends anyway.

Basil

  • Um....err......oh bugger!
  • Help me!
Re: Audible warning was :Re: Pedestrian on the phone
« Reply #4 on: June 18, 2019, 08:47:45 pm »
Anyway. Shouting Oi! leaves two hands available for braking, which mechanical noises don't.
Quote from: Kim
And remember that friends who organise things on Facebook aren't proper friends anyway.

Re: Audible warning was :Re: Pedestrian on the phone
« Reply #5 on: June 18, 2019, 09:29:58 pm »
Years ago I had a tigger horn on my mtn bike, which I used to commute on.  Whenever I used it pedestrians used to look up into the sky. I must admit it could sound a bit like a duck quacking.

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Audible warning was :Re: Pedestrian on the phone
« Reply #6 on: June 18, 2019, 10:03:04 pm »

Round these parts a bell is largely ignored, or more likely to get people to step the wrong way. Only thing that works is shouting, and occasional robust anglo saxon...

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Re: Audible warning was :Re: Pedestrian on the phone
« Reply #7 on: June 18, 2019, 10:14:32 pm »
I’ve not yet encountered an exception to Jurek’s original hypothesis.

A couple of years back I bought a cheap motorbike horn on eBay and wired up to a switch, a relay and three 18650s. I somehow had more encounters with motorists and pedestrians that “deserved” it during the two days I rode with it than any other time. It broke and was never reassembled.

A bell rung vigorously * in anticipation * of pedestrians stepping out when approaching anywhere busy or touristy seems to work fine. As does slowing the fuck down.

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Audible warning was :Re: Pedestrian on the phone
« Reply #8 on: June 18, 2019, 10:19:07 pm »
A bell rung vigorously * in anticipation * of pedestrians stepping out when approaching anywhere busy or touristy seems to work fine. As does slowing the fuck down.

Do that and the stream of cyclists behind you will just crash into you...

I once stopped at a red light, which was a surprise to the cyclists behind me, that all ploughed into my back wheel. Much swearing was had...

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: Audible warning was :Re: Pedestrian on the phone
« Reply #9 on: June 18, 2019, 10:28:05 pm »
Be aware, anticipate silliness and slow down.

No need for parping or dinging.
If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.

LMT

Re: Audible warning was :Re: Pedestrian on the phone
« Reply #10 on: June 18, 2019, 10:35:04 pm »
ETA: Also, as has been mentioned elsewhere - so tell me if I am wrong - but anyone riding a bike fitted with an airhorn has an attitude of the cuntish variety.
Am I wrong?

Perhaps, certainly imo someone who needs to look at their own riding and be more proactive to other road users rather than reactive and getting on the horn. I find an 'easy' or 'on your right/left' better at telling other bike riders and peds about my intentions rather than an air horn

Only one incident has ever stood out for me as genuinely making my piss boil and that was someone turning right onto the Pancras rd from the M'bone road, bulldozing their way through a load of peds crossing the road with the button on an Airzound pressed for a good three - four seconds as he done it. What a wanker.

JennyB

  • Old enough to know better
Re: Audible warning was :Re: Pedestrian on the phone
« Reply #11 on: June 18, 2019, 10:47:40 pm »
I’ve not yet encountered an exception to Jurek’s original hypothesis.

A couple of years back I bought a cheap motorbike horn on eBay and wired up to a switch, a relay and three 18650s. I somehow had more encounters with motorists and pedestrians that “deserved” it during the two days I rode with it than any other time. It broke and was never reassembled.

A bell rung vigorously * in anticipation * of pedestrians stepping out when approaching anywhere busy or touristy seems to work fine. As does slowing the fuck down.


Maybe something like this? If it works for bears....
Jennifer - walker of hills



Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Audible warning was :Re: Pedestrian on the phone
« Reply #12 on: June 19, 2019, 12:26:32 am »
If you're being pursued by BEARS, the pedestrians will probably pay attention.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

bludger

  • Randonneur and bargain hunter
Re: Audible warning was :Re: Pedestrian on the phone
« Reply #13 on: June 19, 2019, 12:32:10 am »
I once did a ride with Thames Velo with a nice Danish chap who could whistle incredibly loudly. I was and still am intensely jealous of this skill.
YACF touring/audax bargain basement:
https://bit.ly/2Xg8pRD


T42

  • Tea tank
Re: Audible warning was :Re: Pedestrian on the phone
« Reply #14 on: June 19, 2019, 07:28:04 am »
I once did a ride with Thames Velo with a nice Danish chap who could whistle incredibly loudly. I was and still am intensely jealous of this skill.

Hmmm... Take hands off bars, put two fingers in mouth, take deep breath, fall off bike.

I usually start to ping about 30 metres back and keep it up as I approach.  If that doesn't work I either bellow "VELO ! ! !" or creep up softly behind and bring out a cheery "Bonjour!" practically in their lug-hole.

BTW, anything other than a bell can get you constabularized in France.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

caerau

  • SR x 3 - PBP fail but 1090 km - hey - not too bad
Re: Audible warning was :Re: Pedestrian on the phone
« Reply #15 on: June 19, 2019, 07:44:06 am »
There's a deliveroo rider in Cardiff who sings opera as he rides*.  This I think is most excellent - and he's actually considerate at riding too.




*Although this does remind me slightly too much of Dynamo in the Running Man

It's a reverse Elvis thing.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Audible warning was :Re: Pedestrian on the phone
« Reply #16 on: June 19, 2019, 08:41:17 am »
I’ve not yet encountered an exception to Jurek’s original hypothesis.

A couple of years back I bought a cheap motorbike horn on eBay and wired up to a switch, a relay and three 18650s. I somehow had more encounters with motorists and pedestrians that “deserved” it during the two days I rode with it than any other time. It broke and was never reassembled.

A bell rung vigorously * in anticipation * of pedestrians stepping out when approaching anywhere busy or touristy seems to work fine. As does slowing the fuck down.

Maybe something like this? If it works for bears....
A dangle bell!
A cup of tea is the perfect bridge between real life and cake.

Tim Hall

  • I want to eat the fleeting shade of your lashes
Re: Audible warning was :Re: Pedestrian on the phone
« Reply #17 on: June 19, 2019, 09:04:06 am »
I once did a ride with Thames Velo with a nice Danish chap who could whistle incredibly loudly. I was and still am intensely jealous of this skill.

Hmmm... Take hands off bars, put two fingers in mouth, take deep breath, fall off bike.

I usually start to ping about 30 metres back and keep it up as I approach.  If that doesn't work I either bellow "VELO ! ! !" or creep up softly behind and bring out a cheery "Bonjour!" practically in their lug-hole.

BTW, anything other than a bell can get you constabularized in France.
Whistling, fingers in the mouth style, can be done one handed. Mind you bludger's Dane might have been of the Lauren Bacall variety, just putting his lips together and blowing.

I favour the Leslie Phillip's approach "Ding dong". However I tend to use  audible warnings on shared use cycle paths to get past walkers or other cyclists, while riding at a pace suitable  (ie slowly) for the surroundings.  As others have suggested when it comes to collision avoidance the priority is slamming on the anchors.

I was in Belgium last weekend.  Apparently it's a legal requirement to have a bell. I was riding a very straight disused railway path and got admonished in Flemish for using my voice when overtaking a group .
There are two ways you can get exercise out of a bicycle: you can
"overhaul" it, or you can ride it.  (Jerome K Jerome)

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Audible warning was :Re: Pedestrian on the phone
« Reply #18 on: June 19, 2019, 10:57:09 am »
Voice is often heard, noticed or taken notice of where a bell is not. And you can say things like "Excuse me!" or "I'm coming past on your right" which can be useful for instance passing small kids on off-road paths, who might otherwise suddenly swerve (with or without panicking!). Of course they still might swerve even knowing you're there...

But a bell is also good in those situations. I find it works best when rung loudly from a good distance out, where you're clearly not about to bump into the people you're ringing at. In a crowded town I don't think it's much use.
A cup of tea is the perfect bridge between real life and cake.

bludger

  • Randonneur and bargain hunter
Re: Audible warning was :Re: Pedestrian on the phone
« Reply #19 on: June 19, 2019, 11:00:52 am »
I once did a ride with Thames Velo with a nice Danish chap who could whistle incredibly loudly. I was and still am intensely jealous of this skill.

Hmmm... Take hands off bars, put two fingers in mouth, take deep breath, fall off bike.

here's the thing; Mr Denmark didn't need to use his fingers. It was extraordinary, I couldn't believe what I was seeing for about half an hour.
YACF touring/audax bargain basement:
https://bit.ly/2Xg8pRD


JennyB

  • Old enough to know better
Re: Audible warning was :Re: Pedestrian on the phone
« Reply #20 on: June 19, 2019, 11:30:19 am »
I once did a ride with Thames Velo with a nice Danish chap who could whistle incredibly loudly. I was and still am intensely jealous of this skill.


My great-aunt Jenny, after whom I am named, was a great whistler. She was also the first woman in Skibbereen to ride a bicycle.
Jennifer - walker of hills



fd3

Re: Audible warning was :Re: Pedestrian on the phone
« Reply #21 on: June 19, 2019, 01:38:34 pm »
Never seen the point.  Bells work 66% of the time[1] on shared paths.  Incoherent yelping is all I have time for for alerting lemming pedestrians, though the Koolstop squeal often helps.
Not my experience as a fellow Brummie cyclist.  I find that a bell will get pedestrians looking in the trees for the strange bird with the bell call, or be ignored.  I favour a loud "ON YOUR RIGHT" and I slow and give early warning as in 33% of cases pedestrians get confused as to which side is right.  (I should probably call out "STAY LEFT").
[/I could be wrong]

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Audible warning was :Re: Pedestrian on the phone
« Reply #22 on: June 19, 2019, 01:50:19 pm »
I reckon it's more like one third "other right", one third don't hear/pay no notice, one third understandably interpret "on your right!" as meaning they should move right.
A cup of tea is the perfect bridge between real life and cake.

fd3

Re: Audible warning was :Re: Pedestrian on the phone
« Reply #23 on: June 19, 2019, 03:26:56 pm »
Interestingly (if you're me) (accepting low stats) IME I had more confusion from pedestrians when I called out "Passing on your right"; the move to "on your right" is clearer to them, potentially because there are less words.
[/I could be wrong]

Re: Audible warning was :Re: Pedestrian on the phone
« Reply #24 on: June 19, 2019, 03:49:55 pm »
Interestingly (if you're me) (accepting low stats) IME I had more confusion from pedestrians when I called out "Passing on your right"; the move to "on your right" is clearer to them, potentially because there are less words.
I think that 'On your right' can sound a bit like a half-greeting of 'You alright?'
'Ding!Ding!' ( I don't have a bell on anything other than the Brommie - and that's soon going to go when I fit a friction lever when I convert it into a 3-speed) called from a distance, usually does it for me, occasionally it elicits  a smile from the ped.