Author Topic: Old pianos  (Read 17245 times)

Wowbagger

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Re: Old pianos
« Reply #125 on: March 27, 2019, 01:47:07 pm »
"Silent" systems on acoustic pianos makes the keys marginally less sensitive, so I'm told. It is pretty marginal.

Feurich, as sold by Roberts, do fit a silent system. I think I played one of these in Vienna, where they are designed and some are manufactured, but I can't recall any particular problems with it. I played lots of different pianos in that showroom.

Bösendorfer have their own peculiar system which also records and the piano will faithfully reproduce the piece you have played. I've never tried this but it won't be cheap.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

CrazyEnglishTriathlete

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Re: Old pianos
« Reply #126 on: April 04, 2019, 07:58:35 pm »
Thinking of old pianos reminds me of this clip:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vn-KEbvCckg

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Wowbagger

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Re: Old pianos
« Reply #127 on: April 04, 2019, 09:17:03 pm »
Thinking of old pianos reminds me of this clip:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vn-KEbvCckg
Valentina Lisitsa is a wonderful pianist.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

Wowbagger

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Re: Old pianos
« Reply #128 on: April 08, 2019, 05:58:43 pm »
Yesterday Jan and I attended a recital/lecture in which the pianist was using an 1870-ish straight-strung Broadwood grand.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

hellymedic

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Re: Old pianos
« Reply #129 on: April 08, 2019, 07:37:27 pm »
Is straight stringing getting trendy in a retro way?

Wowbagger

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Re: Old pianos
« Reply #130 on: April 08, 2019, 08:53:36 pm »
Marcus Roberts isn't altogether against it. I think from a technician's point of view they are easier to work on, and whereas cross-stringing tends to improve the sound of the bass notes, he argues that the tenor/treble parts of the piano are where you play most of the notes and where those strings are longer you tend to get a better tone.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xRUsieTk8Yw is informative.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

Wowbagger

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Re: Old pianos
« Reply #131 on: July 08, 2019, 11:58:12 pm »
https://www.robertspianos.com/ldetails.php?RP=2190701&make=Bechstein&model=7

That's an absolutely gorgeous instrument. My Bechstein, currently residing with my daughter, is a Model III, not so tall as the Model 7. The taller the upright, the longer the bass strings and the more resonant the tone. That video does that piano justice.

I played an even taller piano than that at the Bluthner showrooms last year. It was new, and I thought that the keys were heavy. However, I suspect that some of that may have become looser with playing. It had a lovely tone though.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.