Author Topic: Bathroom fan extractor  (Read 790 times)

velosam

  • '.....you used to be an apple on a stick.'
Bathroom fan extractor
« on: June 27, 2019, 11:28:51 am »
I need to get a quiet and efficient fan extractor.  As I have no idea what I am doing would anyone have any recommendations for one to get.

Given the manner of fitting it will me linked to the light switch. If it has humidity control as well that would be great.

I did look at getting a separate on off switch but it’s too much hassle in wiring.

Thanks

Re: Bathroom fan extractor
« Reply #1 on: June 27, 2019, 01:26:32 pm »
I fitted a new one a couple of years ago.

I don't think you will be able to just link it to the light switch (I am not an electrician). It will require a separate isolation switch. This is pretty easy to install and doesn't need to be immediately adjacent to the bathroom.

Pretty much all new bathroom fans are humidity sensing. This is great - they will run after the light goes off, to continue extracting damp air, until the bathroom is clear.
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Bathroom fan extractor
« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2019, 01:32:25 pm »
Pretty much all new bathroom fans are humidity sensing. This is great - they will run after the light goes off, to continue extracting damp air, until the bathroom is clear.

And presumably don't come on in the middle of the night if you go for a pee?  Some hearing people get really upset about that.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Bathroom fan extractor
« Reply #3 on: June 27, 2019, 01:33:22 pm »
Only expensive ones have humidity sensors. A lot of cheap ones have timers. A timer is probably just as good, tbh.

If you want the fan to run after the light is off you need a permanent supply to it. If you want it to come on when you switch on the light, you need a switched supply. You can have one, the other or both.

Current regs need an isolation switch, usually outside the bathroom. If the fan is inside the exclusion zone created around the bath/shower, it may need a registered electrician to install it.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Bathroom fan extractor
« Reply #4 on: June 27, 2019, 01:35:34 pm »
If you want the fan to run after the light is off you need a permanent supply to it. If you want it to come on when you switch on the light, you need a switched supply. You can have one, the other or both.

If you want it to run after the light is on you need both.  Otherwise the fan doesn't know when to start.

In standard UK wiring practice, the relevant connections are all available at the ceiling rose, but the switch itself won't have a neutral.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
Re: Bathroom fan extractor
« Reply #5 on: June 27, 2019, 01:36:36 pm »
Ours is actually the spotlight above the shower (the LED is in the middle of the fan). It comes on with the light and goes off whenever it feels like it (I think it's a timer rather than sensor, anyway, it works, we have a dry mould-free bathroom). There's an isolator as that's the Law of British Bathrooms (the one that means I have to unreel an extension from the hallway into the bathroom to run proper electrical stuff, because that's safety kids).

It's mostly quiet so we're unbothered by triggering it during nocturnal micturitional adventures.
!nataS pihsroW

Re: Bathroom fan extractor
« Reply #6 on: June 27, 2019, 01:37:19 pm »
And presumably don't come on in the middle of the night if you go for a pee?  Some hearing people get really upset about that.

Yes, if you don't connect anything to the switched supply terminal. It does mean there's nothing to extract non-humid things wot might need extracting.

Using the isolation switch in this situation might be better.

If you want it to run after the light is on you need both.  Otherwise the fan doesn't know when to start.

Yeah, that setup only makes sense if you have a humidity sensor to trigger it.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Bathroom fan extractor
« Reply #7 on: June 27, 2019, 01:43:33 pm »
Using the isolation switch in this situation might be better.

Something to watch out for with isolation switches is that they're often designed for fairly low numbers of switching cycles, on the basis that they're only going to be used when servicing the appliance.  Pull-cord shower isolators are particularly rubbish in this regard (high current rating and relatively complex mechanism), and naturally attract people with the OCD switching-things-off habit.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

velosam

  • '.....you used to be an apple on a stick.'
Re: Bathroom fan extractor
« Reply #8 on: June 27, 2019, 01:54:19 pm »
Thanks all.

Any brands I should aim for or shall I just pick one from Selco/ Wickes?

Thanks

Re: Bathroom fan extractor
« Reply #9 on: June 27, 2019, 07:38:51 pm »
You cant go far wrong with an Xpelair.
Get a bicycle. You will never regret it, if you live- Mark Twain

Re: Bathroom fan extractor
« Reply #10 on: June 27, 2019, 08:01:07 pm »
Manrose Gold (the Gold is important: it has a 5 year warranty and ball bearings).

All humidity fans will require the humidity control tweaking in summer when the heating is off, otherwise they run all the time when the weather is humid.
Never tell me the odds.

Re: Bathroom fan extractor
« Reply #11 on: June 27, 2019, 08:12:22 pm »
Agree with this as currently experiencing same so turned off unit. ^^^^^ Having a fan with timer and overun is not so bad after all. Manrose is a decent brand.
Get a bicycle. You will never regret it, if you live- Mark Twain

velosam

  • '.....you used to be an apple on a stick.'
Re: Bathroom fan extractor
« Reply #12 on: June 27, 2019, 08:31:54 pm »
I am sorry but I am going mad, there are several versions of manrose gold can someone PLEASE recommend the model I should buy please and also which size?

I am guessing I don’t need a pull cord switch if connected to the light switch?

Thanks

Re: Bathroom fan extractor
« Reply #13 on: June 27, 2019, 10:32:12 pm »
Are you fitting from scratch or replacing an existing unit? If the latter, take the outer cover off and have a look at it. Get the same size. Most bathroom ones are 4 inch.

Lots of info here:

https://www.extractorfanworld.co.uk/choosing-a-bathroom-extractor-fan-123-c.asp

velosam

  • '.....you used to be an apple on a stick.'
Re: Bathroom fan extractor
« Reply #14 on: June 27, 2019, 10:36:34 pm »
It’s a 4in over the bath.  I could/ can fit a 6 inch one but it seems most are 4inch.


Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Bathroom fan extractor
« Reply #15 on: June 27, 2019, 10:38:24 pm »
All things being equal, larger fans generally have a better airflow to irritating whiny noise ratio...
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Bathroom fan extractor
« Reply #16 on: July 06, 2019, 08:37:59 am »
Over here in Leftpondia, where we're only trusted with 120 volts so as to just get a little bit shocked, Panasonic sells quite a range of fans with various controls.  The fancier ones have several plug-in modules available, so you can have fan speed controlled by humidity sensing, or by occupant-sensing with a timer afterwards; the occupant-sensing ones can also do a night-light (not as bright as the main light, etc.).  All require at least two switches; one for power, one to activate the special functions.  Perhaps something like that is available to you?