Author Topic: Bike Check?  (Read 2209 times)

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: Bike Check?
« Reply #50 on: July 12, 2019, 05:42:31 am »
His answer is a lot more useful than worrying about the bike check.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

marcusjb

  • Full of bon courage.
    • Occasional wittering
Re: Bike Check?
« Reply #51 on: July 12, 2019, 08:01:12 am »
His answer is a lot more useful than worrying about the bike check.

100%

The bike checkers are not out to make life difficult - they want you to ride PBP just as much as you want to ride it. 

It really is all over in a minute or two.
Right! What's next?

Ooooh. That sounds like a daft idea.  I am in!

zigzag

  • unfuckwithable
Re: Bike Check?
« Reply #52 on: July 12, 2019, 08:16:21 am »
indeed, nothing to worry about.

however, suffering a crash (resulting back injury for three months) because of someone else's preventable fault, i'd like the bike checks to be more thorough and strict..

they did a proper check before the tcrno5, which is understandable as the riders are about to ride 4000km with limited (if any) technical assistance available on the way, so the bikes need to be spot on.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Bike Check?
« Reply #53 on: July 12, 2019, 12:54:52 pm »
I'd say that "nothing to worry about" has already been disproven upthread:

2011 bike check - they didn't like my brakes (which were fine), my lights (which were fine), and something else, so had stressful time getting fine things fixed (so they weren't as fine) and left a couple of hours later, stressed.

"It may come down to a random whim of the checker so there's no point worrying about it in advance" isn't quite the same thing...
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Re: Bike Check?
« Reply #54 on: July 12, 2019, 01:08:26 pm »
I've still got the 35mm film canister, with the spare bulbs nestling in tissue paper inside, from my 1999 bike-check. I already had a screw bulb for my Sanyo dynapower setup, but I spent Monday morning trawling outlets for a spare pre-focus bulb for my D-Cell Cateye. I'd passed the bike test without the right bulbs, and it was preying on my mind.

The Sunday start is a bit problematic in terms of displacement activities to allay anxieties

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: Bike Check?
« Reply #55 on: July 12, 2019, 02:51:26 pm »
Five PBP bike checks so far with not even a hint of worry and I don't expect that to change this time. With 6000+ riders, almost anything is possible but the chances of that 'solitary instance' heading in my direction is too small for me to even consider bothering with.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Bike Check?
« Reply #56 on: July 12, 2019, 02:55:43 pm »
Five PBP bike checks so far with not even a hint of worry and I don't expect that to change this time. With 6000+ riders, almost anything is possible but the chances of that 'solitary instance' heading in my direction is too small for me to even consider bothering with.

If it happens to just 1 rider each time, that's a 1 in 6000 incident rate. Better odds than the lottery...

Each persons acceptable level of risk is different. For some trying to minimise the chances of being in the 1 in 6000, is worth it.

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

FifeingEejit

  • Not Small just Far Away at the back
Re: Bike Check?
« Reply #57 on: July 12, 2019, 03:01:43 pm »
The Venice convention is more useful to worry about, particularly if you're from a non convention country or a Geneva protocol country like Ireland...

Had to point out to an Aussie rider on the tcr Facebook group that road signage in Europe and Asia is effectively standardised because of it after they mistook an end of cycle route sign for a prohibition sign.

I've a bike to rebuild and a wiring issue to resolve and test in the next month.

Sent from my BKL-L09 using Tapatalk


quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Bike Check?
« Reply #58 on: July 12, 2019, 03:08:47 pm »
The Venice convention is more useful to worry about, particularly if you're from a non convention country or a Geneva protocol country like Ireland...

Had to point out to an Aussie rider on the tcr Facebook group that road signage in Europe and Asia is effectively standardised because of it after they mistook an end of cycle route sign for a prohibition sign.

I've a bike to rebuild and a wiring issue to resolve and test in the next month.

Sent from my BKL-L09 using Tapatalk

Vienna convention rather than Venice?

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

FifeingEejit

  • Not Small just Far Away at the back
Re: Bike Check?
« Reply #59 on: July 12, 2019, 03:27:43 pm »
The Venice convention is more useful to worry about, particularly if you're from a non convention country or a Geneva protocol country like Ireland...

Had to point out to an Aussie rider on the tcr Facebook group that road signage in Europe and Asia is effectively standardised because of it after they mistook an end of cycle route sign for a prohibition sign.

I've a bike to rebuild and a wiring issue to resolve and test in the next month.

Sent from my BKL-L09 using Tapatalk

Vienna convention rather than Venice?

J
No, the vienna convention altered and ratified the Geneva protocol on road signage.

That is where the red bordered warning triangles, red bordered prohibition circles,  blue instruction circles and blue rectangular instructional signs come from.
The Irish use diamonds instead of triangles because that's what the Geneva protocol proposed.

The Venice convention is about basic road traffic law standardisation such as basic lighting requirements for vehicles and how to identify vehicles in international traffic (stickers with country codes or blue borders on registration plates with country flag and code)

Sent from my BKL-L09 using Tapatalk

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Bike Check?
« Reply #60 on: July 12, 2019, 03:28:24 pm »
The Venice convention is more useful to worry about, particularly if you're from a non convention country or a Geneva protocol country like Ireland...

Had to point out to an Aussie rider on the tcr Facebook group that road signage in Europe and Asia is effectively standardised because of it after they mistook an end of cycle route sign for a prohibition sign.

I've a bike to rebuild and a wiring issue to resolve and test in the next month.

Sent from my BKL-L09 using Tapatalk

Vienna convention rather than Venice?

J
No, the vienna convention altered and ratified the Geneva protocol on road signage.

That is where the red bordered warning triangles, red bordered prohibition circles,  blue instruction circles and blue rectangular instructional signs come from.
The Irish use diamonds instead of triangles because that's what the Geneva protocol proposed.

The vienna convention is about basic road traffic law standardisation such as basic lighting requirements for vehicles and how to identify vehicles in international traffic (stickers with country codes or blue borders on registration plates with country flag and code)

And the Venice convention?

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

FifeingEejit

  • Not Small just Far Away at the back
Re: Bike Check?
« Reply #61 on: July 12, 2019, 03:48:31 pm »
Fixed the typo

Sent from my BKL-L09 using Tapatalk


Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Bike Check?
« Reply #62 on: July 12, 2019, 04:59:37 pm »
I think you were right about the Vienna Convention before altering the typo, though it does also replace the Geneva Convention of 1949.
https://treaties.un.org/Pages/ViewDetailsIII.aspx?src=TREATY&mtdsg_no=XI-B-19&chapter=11&Temp=mtdsg3&clang=_en
Scroll down and you can see, amongst other stuff, some of the identifying letters. Incidentally, the UK must be one of the tardiest ratifiers of that treaty, maybe any treaty ever: signed at the convention, 8 November 1968, not ratified till 2018.

I can't find anything about the Venice Convention.
sideways bounding monkey lounging under fruit tree