Author Topic: Electric cars won't save the planet article on BBC  (Read 4830 times)

Re: Electric cars won't save the planet article on BBC
« Reply #75 on: July 13, 2019, 09:13:43 pm »
Inductive charging means you have a bloody great big transformer. Which is also a bloody great big radio transmitter (tho on a very very very low frequency, and with really shit efficiency). This is going to cause issues for pacemakers, and anything magnetic that goes in range (credit card mag strip?).

Field strength follows an inverse-cube law, thobut, so it's probably no worse than getting up close and personal with a conventional large transformer or motor, in that respect.  There hasn't been a spate of laptop hard drives (yes, yes, I know) being erased by being placed on the floor of electric trains or anything.

Pacemakers will have been deliberately engineered to tolerate all sorts of electro-magnetic abuse (starter for 10: being repeatedly zapped by a defibrillator must surely be part of the spec), so I'd be reasonably confident about that.  It's the internet-of-shit problems that their users should be worrying about...


Quote
The RF interference is also going to be a fun one to deal with.

That might be a bit more fun, but it's not like motor vehicles[1] don't have a long history of RF obnoxiousness...


Quote
All in all, a nice idea, but not really going to be useful in the long term, and perhaps the efforts going into it could be better spent elsewhere...

It's not a zero-sum game, though.  Much like hydrogen fuel cells, it's something that's technically feasible, and is being developed into practical products.  I agree that battery tech will render it mostly irrelevant in the longer term, but it might find a niche or two where it makes sense, and that's all good.


[1] And I'm compelled to include the notorious Class 220/221 DMUs in that.  It's a good thing they're on rails, because you can forget about using a GPS receiver when there's one of those around.

I think the biggest problem is going to be wiped carpark tickets. Phones will do those in. Even the magnet that closes my "sacoche" (sort of french gentleman's handbag) does that if I'm not careful where I put the ticket (preferably not in the sacoche). Of course this could be a good way of increasing the hassle of taking a car into town, thus forcing people to use buses  :demon: (or simply park where it's most inconvenient for everyone else!)

Why charge buses? In Limoges we have buses that take their power direct from the lines, called trolleybuses ("le trolley" in french). It's old school technology of course (they had them in Cardiff when I was a nipper in the 60's, probably had them when my dad was a nipper too).


Re: Electric cars won't save the planet article on BBC
« Reply #76 on: July 13, 2019, 09:26:13 pm »
Sounds like a Renault Twizy
Someone ought to fiddle with the cabin-motorcycle format to make a light, narrow car which seats 2 people in tandem. Give it 4 wheels, like those leaning trikes but with 2 wheels and the leaning gubbins at both ends.

I think it was called a Messerschmidt, only that was a trike, ICE and very quick. But the idea has scope for development.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Dormant but requires tea
Re: Electric cars won't save the planet article on BBC
« Reply #77 on: July 13, 2019, 10:11:40 pm »
Agreed, fewer cars is better, but fewer cars = better infrastructure, and we don't have that.  Cities (some already) can do this easy enough, but ruralshire makes it cost-prohibitive as private enterprise and a vote loser as public enterprise.  There is a massive political swing needed to accept the cost to the public of universal provision of more sustainable travel for all, whether decent cycle lanes, electric busses or what.  The two bus a day in my village, which don't let London commuters get to the station in time speaks volumes about priorities.
If by infrastructure you mean cycle infrastructure, then fewer cars is a win-win-win: it increases the demand as some of those car users (passengers as well as drivers) start cycling and walking, it releases funds from provision of motor-specific infrastructure due to reduced demand, and it reduces the requirement for specific infrastructure as less motorised traffic means people are less scared and it's easier and more pleasant to cycle and walk on the existing infrastructure, ie roads.

If you're thinking of public transport infrastructure, again fewer cars means buses get through towns a bit easier and find it easier to get to their correct stops (because it's less likely someone's parked in the way). And the same economic arguments for cycling apply to bus and rail infrastructure. Not to mention that even high-speed rail is way cheaper than an equivalent distance of motorway.

The political problems of course remain and we're an awful long way from any of this.

I'm talking public transport and cycling infrastructure i.e. car replacements.  Remember, not everywhere is a city.  It's not always a case of walking a few streets to a bus stop, and fewer cars allowing buse throught more easily where I live it could be walking to the next village.
I'm not sure I follow you here. In villages there is basically no public transport from what I can see; there might a bus or two but not frequently enough to make it dependable and often there's nothing at all. But that doesn't need infrastructure, beyond a bus shelter or two, it needs political will. Villages in other countries often have a good service, not because people don't have cars but because the local authorities have determined that it's worth supporting a bus service for those who don't/can't drive.
At some point in the ride, you might find yourself in Osaka with Spanish speakers where you had expected Edinburgh talking Greek. This does not mean you are lost, or even off route.

Porkins

  • Formerly Nick H. And a long time ago etc, Eurostar
Re: Electric cars won't save the planet article on BBC
« Reply #78 on: July 13, 2019, 10:12:20 pm »
I think it was called a Messerschmidt, only that was a trike, ICE and very quick. But the idea has scope for development.

There've been some concept cars...the Nissan Land Glider:



And the Volkswagen L1:



A Volvo:



Plus of course the Twizy, as mentioned by Kim, which is real. Been in production since 2012, sold 22,000 worldwide as of Dec 2018. Doesn't look like something which would appeal to a car fan though. Perhaps too French for our tastes. And it gets classified as a quadricycle in the EU because it is very slow, light and gutless.








ElyDave

  • Royal and Ancient Polar Bear Society member 263583
Re: Electric cars won't save the planet article on BBC
« Reply #79 on: July 13, 2019, 10:37:06 pm »
Agreed, fewer cars is better, but fewer cars = better infrastructure, and we don't have that.  Cities (some already) can do this easy enough, but ruralshire makes it cost-prohibitive as private enterprise and a vote loser as public enterprise.  There is a massive political swing needed to accept the cost to the public of universal provision of more sustainable travel for all, whether decent cycle lanes, electric busses or what.  The two bus a day in my village, which don't let London commuters get to the station in time speaks volumes about priorities.
If by infrastructure you mean cycle infrastructure, then fewer cars is a win-win-win: it increases the demand as some of those car users (passengers as well as drivers) start cycling and walking, it releases funds from provision of motor-specific infrastructure due to reduced demand, and it reduces the requirement for specific infrastructure as less motorised traffic means people are less scared and it's easier and more pleasant to cycle and walk on the existing infrastructure, ie roads.

If you're thinking of public transport infrastructure, again fewer cars means buses get through towns a bit easier and find it easier to get to their correct stops (because it's less likely someone's parked in the way). And the same economic arguments for cycling apply to bus and rail infrastructure. Not to mention that even high-speed rail is way cheaper than an equivalent distance of motorway.

The political problems of course remain and we're an awful long way from any of this.

I'm talking public transport and cycling infrastructure i.e. car replacements.  Remember, not everywhere is a city.  It's not always a case of walking a few streets to a bus stop, and fewer cars allowing buse throught more easily where I live it could be walking to the next village.
I'm not sure I follow you here. In villages there is basically no public transport from what I can see; there might a bus or two but not frequently enough to make it dependable and often there's nothing at all. But that doesn't need infrastructure, beyond a bus shelter or two, it needs political will. Villages in other countries often have a good service, not because people don't have cars but because the local authorities have determined that it's worth supporting a bus service for those who don't/can't drive.

I think you do follow me, and i thimk we are in agreement. I tend to include the buses themselves in the infrastructure, they're kind of important.
“Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.” –Charles Dickens

Cudzoziemiec

  • Dormant but requires tea
Re: Electric cars won't save the planet article on BBC
« Reply #80 on: July 13, 2019, 10:46:10 pm »
Okay, I wouldn't think of vehicles as infrastructure so it hadn't made much sense to me. Sure, without buses – and drivers, there seems to be a lack of them round here – you can't run a bus service.
At some point in the ride, you might find yourself in Osaka with Spanish speakers where you had expected Edinburgh talking Greek. This does not mean you are lost, or even off route.

MikeFromLFE

  • Previously known as Millimole
Re: Electric cars won't save the planet article on BBC
« Reply #81 on: July 14, 2019, 08:38:58 am »
I'll not try quoting - but public transport

On the back of a huge new housing development on our edge of Leicester - called New Lubbesthorpe - Arriva have launched a "bus service" covering a swathe of the Western edge of the city and surrounding suburbs.
The Arriva Click service is a hybrid bus/Uber - it's app driven, but you go to, or are dropped off at a bus stop.
It seems to be available for about 18 hours a day (reports say you can order a ride outside the advertised times) and maximum fare is £5.25 - but they don't do bus passes, and don't seem to be disabled accessible. And they are diesel minibuses.
The effect is that we can now get to places, by bus, that were difficult by public transport +/- expensive by taxi.

https://www.arrivabus.co.uk/arrivaclick/about-arrivaclick/where-you-can-go/where-you-can-go-leicester/

Expanded out into the rurals this is a good model for public transport IMO

Sent from my Moto E (4) Plus using Tapatalk

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ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
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Re: Electric cars won't save the planet article on BBC
« Reply #82 on: July 14, 2019, 11:52:04 am »
Public transport is hugely expensive and always has a finite capacity. It's much cheaper to provide cycle infrastructure to create capacity for moving people than it is to build new public transport. And if you can persuade existing public transport users onto bikes (or to stay at home) then you create capacity for car drivers to switch.

TfL's policy until very recently was "we'll build more lines and run more trains and buses" to keep up with demand, but in the last few years they've come round to the idea of how unaffordable that is.

So there's a good argument for not trying to solve the transport problem solely with public transport, but I don't think there's much pressing need to reduce existing public transport usage/provision.

From the interview I've read recently, TfL (and Network Rail) are still pretty much mired in the 'build more' mode. TfL still want the ludicrous Silvertown tunnel. Surrey has been trying to build bigger roads for years and seemingly hasn't entirely given up. There's still an unwillingness to question our need to be travelling everywhere and I guess giant multibillion projects are more 'fun' than pedestrianising a high street.
!nataS pihsroW

fd3

Re: Electric cars won't save the planet article on BBC
« Reply #83 on: July 14, 2019, 12:13:24 pm »
Building new things gets more/better publicity than fixing things.

I like the look of the narrow cars, but there has to be a very strong argument for them - basically they are a "second car" design for people who already have a primary car for hauling stuff/family.  I can also see the perceived "bigger car is safer" reducing interest in smaller cars, let alone single-seaters.  You would need to not just make it cheaper for the small cars and more expensive for the big ones, you would need to make roads/lanes/areas only accessible by the smaller cars.

I know Network rail is at capacity, so moving people onto rail would require expanding the network.  Again, flexi-time in working hours could deal with this.

[/I could be wrong]

Mr Larrington

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Re: Electric cars won't save the planet article on BBC
« Reply #84 on: July 14, 2019, 12:36:27 pm »
Sounds like a Renault Twizy
Someone ought to fiddle with the cabin-motorcycle format to make a light, narrow car which seats 2 people in tandem. Give it 4 wheels, like those leaning trikes but with 2 wheels and the leaning gubbins at both ends.

I think it was called a Messerschmidt, only that was a trike, ICE and very quick. But the idea has scope for development.

Fend did make 320 examples of the Tiger, which was essentially a four-wheeled version of the Messerschmitt Kabinenroller trike.  One sold at auction for 322,000 USD in 2013 though, so looking for a clean low mileage example is going to be a spendy proposition.
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

JennyB

  • Old enough to know better
Re: Electric cars won't save the planet article on BBC
« Reply #85 on: July 14, 2019, 05:36:21 pm »
Narrowest of all is the Tango, which doesn't tilt.


https://youtu.be/lGyCtqLDAtk


It's been 20 years since they first  started thinking about it. That clip gives some of the reasons.
Jennifer - walker of hills



Re: Electric cars won't save the planet article on BBC
« Reply #86 on: July 14, 2019, 10:52:30 pm »
To get back to the OP the thing that strikes me is that we talk about saving the planet in terms of a UK centric solution (and even a very limited UK urban centric problem. The solution really needs to be much more universal than that!
Perhaps I see things like this because even though this is principally a UK orientated forum I am living elsewhere and so tend to see things differently.

All the solutions mentioned so far (bar one) are irrelevant to my situation or impractical. I would love to run an electric (hybrid would be more appropriate to my needs) but the starting prices for secondhand ones are about 15000€ (Yaris or Auris), I don't think secondhand Zoes are around much yet (or even in private hands outside Paris). Which means around 15 times the price of what I'm running, which is over 30 tears old and polluting but fits the budget (I earn about 1000€ a month and the car is an essential production tool; without it I don't work). To pay an electric my boss would have to pay me 5 times what he does! This of course is a part of the Macron arguement that fuelled the Gilets Jaunes, scrapping the old bangers to replace them with electrics. It really isn't a simple problem of commuter transport, there is a whole lot going on out there outside 7.30-9.00 and 5.30-7,00pm.

The only real universal approach is going to be to change the whole of the way society functions to reduce transport needs. Thz starting point I would suggest should be industry and employment (that means all employment, not just offices and stuff that can be done from home on "tele-travail" whatever that may be in anglo-saxon. To do that we need some research on how things have evolved from a pre-car period, to avoid the Macron mistake of seeing a solution without knowing how the problem comes about. At least in France car-dependance in work is a major problem, particularly because the worst hit are the least secure jobs and the driving requirement (no pun intended) comes from the employers.

On a different note, I am not convinced by all the arguements of the dutch experience. The dutch are still car dependant, just not in the Netherlands. For every one "hollandaise" loaded for cycle(touring that I see I see several hundred cars and SUVs, a lot hauling caravans. And I live in an area that is favoured quite a lot by the dutch! Of course there are bikes on some of the caravans and trailers, but their use is a bit discrete.

Re: Electric cars won't save the planet article on BBC
« Reply #87 on: July 14, 2019, 11:03:30 pm »
maybe pass laws that only allow you to use your car every other day (based on your number plate being odd or even numbered). 

Yeah, that'd work - cos no-one'd simply get 2 cars ... ;D ::-)
It is what it is. It's not what it's not, so it must be what it is.

Re: Electric cars won't save the planet article on BBC
« Reply #88 on: July 14, 2019, 11:10:56 pm »
maybe pass laws that only allow you to use your car every other day (based on your number plate being odd or even numbered). 

Yeah, that'd work - cos no-one'd simply get 2 cars ... ;D ::-)
Already done. Stinking rich parisians buy two cars and claim tax relief. I haven't yet heard of any enterprising car hire firm latching onto the potential for making money but I suppose they are. I of course am a good provincial who  despises parisians (not totally of course, just mainly)

Pingu

  • Put away those fiery biscuits!
  • Mrs Pingu's domestique
    • the Igloo
Re: Electric cars won't save the planet article on BBC
« Reply #89 on: July 14, 2019, 11:21:59 pm »
maybe pass laws that only allow you to use your car every other day (based on your number plate being odd or even numbered). 

Yeah, that'd work - cos no-one'd simply get 2 cars ... ;D ::-)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wUG1GexVz2k

Cudzoziemiec

  • Dormant but requires tea
Re: Electric cars won't save the planet article on BBC
« Reply #90 on: July 15, 2019, 09:15:57 am »
I'll not try quoting - but public transport

On the back of a huge new housing development on our edge of Leicester - called New Lubbesthorpe - Arriva have launched a "bus service" covering a swathe of the Western edge of the city and surrounding suburbs.
The Arriva Click service is a hybrid bus/Uber - it's app driven, but you go to, or are dropped off at a bus stop.
It seems to be available for about 18 hours a day (reports say you can order a ride outside the advertised times) and maximum fare is £5.25 - but they don't do bus passes, and don't seem to be disabled accessible. And they are diesel minibuses.
The effect is that we can now get to places, by bus, that were difficult by public transport +/- expensive by taxi.

https://www.arrivabus.co.uk/arrivaclick/about-arrivaclick/where-you-can-go/where-you-can-go-leicester/

Expanded out into the rurals this is a good model for public transport IMO

Sent from my Moto E (4) Plus using Tapatalk
A bit like a community minibus but on a commercial basis?
At some point in the ride, you might find yourself in Osaka with Spanish speakers where you had expected Edinburgh talking Greek. This does not mean you are lost, or even off route.

Mr Larrington

  • A bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
  • Custard Wallah
    • Mr Larrington's Automatic Diary
Re: Electric cars won't save the planet article on BBC
« Reply #91 on: July 15, 2019, 10:53:26 am »
maybe pass laws that only allow you to use your car every other day (based on your number plate being odd or even numbered). 

Yeah, that'd work - cos no-one'd simply get 2 cars ... ;D ::-)
Already done. Stinking rich parisians buy two cars and claim tax relief. I haven't yet heard of any enterprising car hire firm latching onto the potential for making money but I suppose they are. I of course am a good provincial who  despises parisians (not totally of course, just mainly)

They tried it in Athens as long ago as the 1970s, sparking a lucrative trade in fake number plates.  No ANPR in those days.
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
Re: Electric cars won't save the planet article on BBC
« Reply #92 on: July 15, 2019, 01:14:52 pm »
Building new things gets more/better publicity than fixing things.

I like the look of the narrow cars, but there has to be a very strong argument for them - basically they are a "second car" design for people who already have a primary car for hauling stuff/family.  I can also see the perceived "bigger car is safer" reducing interest in smaller cars, let alone single-seaters.  You would need to not just make it cheaper for the small cars and more expensive for the big ones, you would need to make roads/lanes/areas only accessible by the smaller cars.

I know Network rail is at capacity, so moving people onto rail would require expanding the network.  Again, flexi-time in working hours could deal with this.

Cars are status symbols, of course, which is a bit stupid as I'm sure the current plague of large Range Rovers and the ugly-stick ilk are all bought on financing plans. I've never really understood that, but I read a survey a couple of weeks back that made it clear, people really believe their car is a representative of their status. In which case, I have a twelve-year-old Ford Ka.

Much as we'd replace it with an electric car, I still think the entire concept of electric cars is a bit of a fop to our privileged life-style. No one benefits from having to travel. It should be a sort of luxury when it's necessary, not a routine. And even then, a lot of our travel is for modest distances. Who really wants to sit in a car for forty minutes to get to work?

We should indeed be looking at ways to cut back the need to travel. Homeworking, more local jobs, more localism. Let's revitalize where we live rather than have to drive to dull retail park to stand in a warehouse filled with Chinese manufactured crap that's been shipped across the world.

We can't just keep building stuff – it's massively expensive and creates more problems than it solves. Sure, TfL can build the Silvertown tunnel, but I can guarantee that a year after it opens, the run-up will look exactly like it does to the Blackwall Tunnel today. Surrey only got bumped back on its latest road plans because they wanted to build them in posh places (Wisley etc.) filled with Tories.
!nataS pihsroW

Re: Electric cars won't save the planet article on BBC
« Reply #93 on: July 15, 2019, 01:29:17 pm »
I'll not try quoting - but public transport

On the back of a huge new housing development on our edge of Leicester - called New Lubbesthorpe - Arriva have launched a "bus service" covering a swathe of the Western edge of the city and surrounding suburbs.
The Arriva Click service is a hybrid bus/Uber - it's app driven, but you go to, or are dropped off at a bus stop.
It seems to be available for about 18 hours a day (reports say you can order a ride outside the advertised times) and maximum fare is £5.25 - but they don't do bus passes, and don't seem to be disabled accessible. And they are diesel minibuses.
The effect is that we can now get to places, by bus, that were difficult by public transport +/- expensive by taxi.

https://www.arrivabus.co.uk/arrivaclick/about-arrivaclick/where-you-can-go/where-you-can-go-leicester/

Expanded out into the rurals this is a good model for public transport IMO

Sent from my Moto E (4) Plus using Tapatalk
A bit like a community minibus but on a commercial basis?
I don't know how community minibusses used to run - tell us more?
Oxford bus company has been running asomething similar for about a year (but you don't need an actual bus stop - they can collect and drop off at other places too) - more information here: https://pickmeup.oxfordbus.co.uk/

JennyB

  • Old enough to know better
Re: Electric cars won't save the planet article on BBC
« Reply #94 on: July 15, 2019, 02:47:09 pm »
An enlightening blog on the realities of designing transit systems.


https://humantransit.org/
Jennifer - walker of hills



Cudzoziemiec

  • Dormant but requires tea
Re: Electric cars won't save the planet article on BBC
« Reply #95 on: July 16, 2019, 12:46:54 pm »
I'll not try quoting - but public transport

On the back of a huge new housing development on our edge of Leicester - called New Lubbesthorpe - Arriva have launched a "bus service" covering a swathe of the Western edge of the city and surrounding suburbs.
The Arriva Click service is a hybrid bus/Uber - it's app driven, but you go to, or are dropped off at a bus stop.
It seems to be available for about 18 hours a day (reports say you can order a ride outside the advertised times) and maximum fare is £5.25 - but they don't do bus passes, and don't seem to be disabled accessible. And they are diesel minibuses.
The effect is that we can now get to places, by bus, that were difficult by public transport +/- expensive by taxi.

https://www.arrivabus.co.uk/arrivaclick/about-arrivaclick/where-you-can-go/where-you-can-go-leicester/

Expanded out into the rurals this is a good model for public transport IMO

Sent from my Moto E (4) Plus using Tapatalk
A bit like a community minibus but on a commercial basis?
I don't know how community minibusses used to run - tell us more?
Oxford bus company has been running asomething similar for about a year (but you don't need an actual bus stop - they can collect and drop off at other places too) - more information here: https://pickmeup.oxfordbus.co.uk/
I was thinking of something like "dial a ride" where you phone up and get collected from your door, like a taxi, but in a minibus which picks up various other people on the way. For a while there was something in Bristol and a few other cities called Slide. It closed down but might still be running elsewhere. It was a minibus which you booked a ride in and I think it only ran on vaguely predetermined routes rather than anywhere, which worked cos it was aimed specifically at commuters (except it didn't work cos it went bust). Or concepts abroad like "maxi taxi".
At some point in the ride, you might find yourself in Osaka with Spanish speakers where you had expected Edinburgh talking Greek. This does not mean you are lost, or even off route.

simonp

  • Omnomnomnipotent.
Re: Electric cars won't save the planet article on BBC
« Reply #96 on: July 17, 2019, 11:49:43 am »
If induction charging were available and the up-front cost wasn't prohibitive, I would consider it.

Because Dez is about to take delivery of a Tesla, and I have a Leaf, we had to change our 7kw charging point from a tethered to an untethered one.

What's the difference in charging connector between Model 3 and Leaf that causes this requirement?

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Electric cars won't save the planet article on BBC
« Reply #97 on: July 17, 2019, 11:56:20 am »
If induction charging were available and the up-front cost wasn't prohibitive, I would consider it.

Because Dez is about to take delivery of a Tesla, and I have a Leaf, we had to change our 7kw charging point from a tethered to an untethered one.

What's the difference in charging connector between Model 3 and Leaf that causes this requirement?


Chademo vs CCS, at a guess?

There seems to be two competing "standards" for the charging connector, with Tesla's own thrown in the mix for added confusion. Tho I believe in .EU, they are shipping the Model 3 with CCS (I may be wrong on that one).

And it's not a simple easy adaptor cable thing either, as CCS is AC, and chademo is DC.

With the move to 150kW and 350kW charging, the cables are getting increasingly complex, some even going so far as to run coolant down the cable into the plug and back, so as to cool the cable when it's taking such large amounts of power.

The technology is still immature enough that we're having the whole xkcd://927 problem...



J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

simonp

  • Omnomnomnipotent.
Re: Electric cars won't save the planet article on BBC
« Reply #98 on: July 17, 2019, 12:02:26 pm »
If induction charging were available and the up-front cost wasn't prohibitive, I would consider it.

Because Dez is about to take delivery of a Tesla, and I have a Leaf, we had to change our 7kw charging point from a tethered to an untethered one.

What's the difference in charging connector between Model 3 and Leaf that causes this requirement?


Chademo vs CCS, at a guess?

There seems to be two competing "standards" for the charging connector, with Tesla's own thrown in the mix for added confusion. Tho I believe in .EU, they are shipping the Model 3 with CCS (I may be wrong on that one).

And it's not a simple easy adaptor cable thing either, as CCS is AC, and chademo is DC.

With the move to 150kW and 350kW charging, the cables are getting increasingly complex, some even going so far as to run coolant down the cable into the plug and back, so as to cool the cable when it's taking such large amounts of power.

The technology is still immature enough that we're having the whole xkcd://927 problem...



J

I was wondering what the issue was because I think the Chademo is for rapid charging, and I thought the also Leaf has Type 2 - but if Wowbagger has an older Leaf then maybe it's Type 1? CCS is, as I understand it, a Type 2 compatible with additional pins below for DC rapid charging.

We have a Type 2 tethered cable and I would like to keep it that way if getting a TM3 and keeping the PHEV. It's much faster and simpler to connect to the car from a tethered cable than to get a cable out of the car every time.

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Electric cars won't save the planet article on BBC
« Reply #99 on: July 17, 2019, 12:04:56 pm »
Sounds like a Renault Twizy
Someone ought to fiddle with the cabin-motorcycle format to make a light, narrow car which seats 2 people in tandem. Give it 4 wheels, like those leaning trikes but with 2 wheels and the leaning gubbins at both ends.

I think it was called a Messerschmidt, only that was a trike, ICE and very quick. But the idea has scope for development.

Round these parts there are quite a few canta brommobilen:



Limited to 40kph, they used to be allowed to use the cycle lanes, but got kicked out along with the mopeds/brommers. They stink, they are noisy, and I hate having to overtake them...

Increasingly they are being replaced by biro:



They are electric, have the same limitations as the canta, but being electric don't stink, and are quiet...

Interesting quirk of Dutch law: they aren't allowed to be parked on the road (they aren't cars), so have to be parked on the pavement... Which is suboptimal...

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/