Author Topic: LEJOG: 26 - 31 JULY 2020  (Read 12124 times)

Re: LEJOG: 26 - 31 JULY 2020
« Reply #50 on: January 16, 2020, 09:13:44 pm »
Just as a matter of interest how much climbing roughly is there on the route in meters? Would it be the up down affair the PBP is or something completely different. Just ballpark
Andy has just updated the Audax UK page and moots 12,000 metres "12000m [6000m for AAA]".
http://www.aukweb.net/events/detail/20-64/
Edit: The AAA sections will be the first 250km LE to Taunton, and about 350km Kendal to Rannoch Moor.
I have attempted a rough sketch of the route, based on Andy's 'Route' tab on the main event site:
https://lejog1400audax.com/event-route/
My effort comes to 1,414km + 13,682m (and that's on RwGPS - routes generally seem to come in at 90% of the AAA man's assessment).
https://ridewithgps.com/routes/31764424?beta=false
I will be amending this as new information appears. Note that this ride has a mandatory route - in accordance with the organiser's detailed routesheets etc so this 'stab' is for interest only.
This is a complete guess, just based on the stated controls (as at 14 Jan) and the small scale Googlemap walking images on https://lejog1400audax.com/event-route/

Re: LEJOG: 26 - 31 JULY 2020
« Reply #51 on: January 17, 2020, 11:30:06 am »
Going to have to find some training motivation, 2020 has so far gone badly (bad head cold).

Had started to be a reasonable 2020 until the headcold arrived on Tuesday!  I suspect I have now undone all the good work. 

This was always expected to be sketchy due to illness and injury last year but a trial for LEL next year.  I have booked adequate time off work that even if out of time I can finish.

simonp

  • Omnomnomnipotent.
Re: LEJOG: 26 - 31 JULY 2020
« Reply #52 on: January 17, 2020, 11:37:37 am »
Just as a matter of interest how much climbing roughly is there on the route in meters? Would it be the up down affair the PBP is or something completely different. Just ballpark
Andy has just updated the Audax UK page and moots 12,000 metres.
http://www.aukweb.net/events/detail/20-64/
I have attempted a rough sketch of the route, based on Andy's 'Route' tab on the main event site:
https://lejog1400audax.com/event-route/
My effort comes to 1,414km + 13,682m (and that's on RwGPS - routes generally seem to come in at 90% of the AAA man's assessment).
https://ridewithgps.com/routes/31764424?beta=false
I will be amending this as new information appears. Note that this ride has a mandatory route - in accordance with the organiser's detailed routesheets etc so this 'stab' is for interest only.
This is a complete guess, just based on the stated controls (as at 14 Jan) and the small scale Googlemap walking images on https://lejog1400audax.com/event-route/

Note that the googlemap for stage 2 seems to start at Weston-Super-Mare rather than Sandford. It looks like some random street in Weston, no sign of any suitable control building there, so I expect this is still subject to change.

I've taken the liberty of making a copy and moving Sandford to Weston-Super-Mare and making some adjustments around Avonmouth. Also avoiding the Strawberry Line - this has a poor surface.

https://ridewithgps.com/routes/31767707

Just as much a guess as yours. It's a fair bit shorter.


Re: LEJOG: 26 - 31 JULY 2020
« Reply #53 on: January 17, 2020, 06:06:43 pm »
My effort comes to 1,414km + 13,682m (and that's on RwGPS - routes generally seem to come in at 90% of the AAA man's assessment).
https://ridewithgps.com/routes/31764424?beta=false
I will be amending this as new information appears. Note that this ride has a mandatory route - in accordance with the organiser's detailed routesheets etc so this 'stab' is for interest only.
This is a complete guess, just based on the stated controls (as at 14 Jan) and the small scale Googlemap walking images on https://lejog1400audax.com/event-route/
Note that the googlemap for stage 2 seems to start at Weston-Super-Mare rather than Sandford. It looks like some random street in Weston, no sign of any suitable control building there, so I expect this is still subject to change.
I've taken the liberty of making a copy and moving Sandford to Weston-Super-Mare and making some adjustments around Avonmouth. Also avoiding the Strawberry Line - this has a poor surface.
https://ridewithgps.com/routes/31767707
Just as much a guess as yours. It's a fair bit shorter.
Andy updated the event page on 14 Jan. Previously the first 300/day ended in Weston. Now the control is stated as Sandford. Which is why my route goes through Sandford. Day 1 is missing from the 'route' webpage, presumably because Andy has pulled it and is amending it to go to Sandford :) .
Using the Strawberry Line is the best route (IMO) and avoids Bristol's busy centre, I used it for my end-to-end, so I'm biased and try to find a bit of rough stuff on every audax, but I use it for all my journeys north from Devon to the Severn Bridge. In July the Line's surface is fine (with just an element of audaciousness (and lights in the tunnel)) except for those with a very high non-tarmac avoidance threshold - have you ridden it recently? It also goes right past Sandford and lines one up with Yatton and the minor roads to the Avon Bridge (NCN26; if riders prefer the A38 trunk road and the Bristol racetracks, they can dig out).
Bridgwater to the M48 Aust junction via Sandford is 74k + 629m by the A38 and the A4 and through the Avonmouth industry zone. It's 79k + (only) 358m via the tunnel and NCN 26 and the Avon Bridge and then NCN41 (mainly).
As you say, my draft route https://ridewithgps.com/routes/31764424?beta=false is just a guess (but goes through Sandford rather than Weston so is shorter) and is a 'fair bit' flatter (than A38 option).

Re: LEJOG: 26 - 31 JULY 2020
« Reply #54 on: January 18, 2020, 10:36:19 am »
As (a Dutch) participant of this event I am looking forward to this trip and trying to get an idea of the route in terms of climbs, scenery and also safety.

Pictures of the sign in Lands End to John O Croats indicate 873 miles which is 1405 km.
The route therefore must be close to I presume the shortest route? leaving little room for alternative routes for busy roads?

Coming from the Netherlands, I am not very comfortable with riding close to the borders of busy roads while large lorries are passing closely by with relative high speeds (especially at night in the rain) ::-).

Having limited bicycling experience abroad (only PBP 2019) and thus non in England and Scotland, I am a little worried how many roads like this there will be, how save I will be and also what I can do more than the usual (sufficient lighting, reflective tape on wheels and wearing a reflective safety vest) to decrease risks apart form staying home :-).

simonp

  • Omnomnomnipotent.
Re: LEJOG: 26 - 31 JULY 2020
« Reply #55 on: January 18, 2020, 11:18:53 am »
My effort comes to 1,414km + 13,682m (and that's on RwGPS - routes generally seem to come in at 90% of the AAA man's assessment).
https://ridewithgps.com/routes/31764424?beta=false
I will be amending this as new information appears. Note that this ride has a mandatory route - in accordance with the organiser's detailed routesheets etc so this 'stab' is for interest only.
This is a complete guess, just based on the stated controls (as at 14 Jan) and the small scale Googlemap walking images on https://lejog1400audax.com/event-route/
Note that the googlemap for stage 2 seems to start at Weston-Super-Mare rather than Sandford. It looks like some random street in Weston, no sign of any suitable control building there, so I expect this is still subject to change.
I've taken the liberty of making a copy and moving Sandford to Weston-Super-Mare and making some adjustments around Avonmouth. Also avoiding the Strawberry Line - this has a poor surface.
https://ridewithgps.com/routes/31767707
Just as much a guess as yours. It's a fair bit shorter.
Andy updated the event page on 14 Jan. Previously the first 300/day ended in Weston. Now the control is stated as Sandford. Which is why my route goes through Sandford. Day 1 is missing from the 'route' webpage, presumably because Andy has pulled it and is amending it to go to Sandford :) .
Using the Strawberry Line is the best route (IMO) and avoids Bristol's busy centre, I used it for my end-to-end, so I'm biased and try to find a bit of rough stuff on every audax, but I use it for all my journeys north from Devon to the Severn Bridge. In July the Line's surface is fine (with just an element of audaciousness (and lights in the tunnel)) except for those with a very high non-tarmac avoidance threshold - have you ridden it recently? It also goes right past Sandford and lines one up with Yatton and the minor roads to the Avon Bridge (NCN26; if riders prefer the A38 trunk road and the Bristol racetracks, they can dig out).
Bridgwater to the M48 Aust junction via Sandford is 74k + 629m by the A38 and the A4 and through the Avonmouth industry zone. It's 79k + (only) 358m via the tunnel and NCN 26 and the Avon Bridge and then NCN41 (mainly).
As you say, my draft route https://ridewithgps.com/routes/31764424?beta=false is just a guess (but goes through Sandford) and is a 'fair bit' flatter.

Thanks for the clarification re the Sandford control - it's ideal for me, as we live close to your suggested route. I've not ridden the Strawberry Line recently; I used to commute to Bristol using the train from Yatton. We still have scars from being knocked off our tandem by a badger late at night on there on the way home from an Easter Arrow in 2012, and some ruined kit.

My alternative to the Strawberry Line isn't to go A38 through Bristol (though I've done that plenty times), it's this:

https://ridewithgps.com/routes/31769829


simonp

  • Omnomnomnipotent.
Re: LEJOG: 26 - 31 JULY 2020
« Reply #56 on: January 18, 2020, 12:07:07 pm »
As (a Dutch) participant of this event I am looking forward to this trip and trying to get an idea of the route in terms of climbs, scenery and also safety.

Pictures of the sign in Lands End to John O Croats indicate 873 miles which is 1405 km.
The route therefore must be close to I presume the shortest route? leaving little room for alternative routes for busy roads?

Coming from the Netherlands, I am not very comfortable with riding close to the borders of busy roads while large lorries are passing closely by with relative high speeds (especially at night in the rain) ::-).

Having limited bicycling experience abroad (only PBP 2019) and thus non in England and Scotland, I am a little worried how many roads like this there will be, how save I will be and also what I can do more than the usual (sufficient lighting, reflective tape on wheels and wearing a reflective safety vest) to decrease risks apart form staying home :-).

Because this is mandatory route, in my view this gives the organiser more flexibility in avoiding unpleasant sections of road. The shortest possible route is around 1400km but the rules allow up to 1470km so this would allow for detours. There are some long sections in Scotland (north of Glasgow) where there is basically only one road, these are usually single carriageways such as the A82 over Rannoch Moor.




Re: LEJOG: 26 - 31 JULY 2020
« Reply #57 on: January 19, 2020, 09:40:17 am »
As (a Dutch) participant of this event I am looking forward to this trip and trying to get an idea of the route in terms of climbs, scenery and also safety.

Pictures of the sign in Lands End to John O Croats indicate 873 miles which is 1405 km.
The route therefore must be close to I presume the shortest route? leaving little room for alternative routes for busy roads?

Coming from the Netherlands, I am not very comfortable with riding close to the borders of busy roads while large lorries are passing closely by with relative high speeds (especially at night in the rain) ::-).

Having limited bicycling experience abroad (only PBP 2019) and thus non in England and Scotland, I am a little worried how many roads like this there will be, how save I will be and also what I can do more than the usual (sufficient lighting, reflective tape on wheels and wearing a reflective safety vest) to decrease risks apart form staying home :-).
Google maps gives 812 miles by walking or 836 driving, so the 1400+ km is not all that close to the shortest possible route. I would not expect to spend much time on busy main roads
   Eddington  87 miles

Re: LEJOG: 26 - 31 JULY 2020
« Reply #58 on: January 19, 2020, 11:31:23 am »
As (a Dutch) participant of this event I am looking forward to this trip and trying to get an idea of the route in terms of climbs, scenery and also safety.

Pictures of the sign in Lands End to John O Croats indicate 873 miles which is 1405 km.
The route therefore must be close to I presume the shortest route? leaving little room for alternative routes for busy roads?
Coming from the Netherlands, I am not very comfortable with riding close to the borders of busy roads while large lorries are passing closely by with relative high speeds (especially at night in the rain) ::-).
Having limited bicycling experience abroad (only PBP 2019) and thus non in England and Scotland, I am a little worried how many roads like this there will be, how safe I will be and also what I can do more than the usual (sufficient lighting, reflective tape on wheels and wearing a reflective safety vest) to decrease risks apart form staying home :-).
Google maps gives 812 miles by walking or 836 driving, so the 1400+ km is not all that close to the shortest possible route. I would not expect to spend much time on busy main roads
"climbs, scenery"? The profile on the RwGPS route I've drafted (link in my post above) should give you an insight into the 'scenery' (climbs). The number of steep climbs (steeper than 1:10 - do you remember the steep pull up from Longny les Villages (PBP @ 99km)?) is close to nil (Helmsdale @1335km steepest?), so not dissimilar to PBP - similar climb per 100km. As @Ww says, I'm sure the route will be designed to minimise time on main roads [Edit: south of the Clyde] - to a very small percentage. No time on the A30 once it's dualled (at Hayle); bit busy into/through Taunton and Bridgwater; brief moments on the A49, and I've commented on the A6, A82 and A9 below.

Andy's route seems to skirt the southern side of Bodmin Moor - with Minions a 'high'light; crosses Dartmoor (national park) - the climb up from Tavistock is about 370m in 10km with two efforts of one km @ 1:11; crosses the Severn Bridge and up the Wye valley (Forest of Dean and past Tintern Abbey); heads up the Welsh Marches past War of the Roses castles etc, gets an unavoidable urban fix from the Mersey to the Ribble; then enjoys the A6 (with variations into Kendal possibly) - that road takes only local traffic as the M6 takes the heavy stuff - over Demmings Moss (at 426m) to Carlisle. The climb up from Kendal is close to 400m in 16km.

Then it's into Scotland and the 'old main road' to Glasgow (again the M74 takes all the traffic); bypass Glasgow via Paisley to the Erskine Bridge across the Clyde, wiggle up to Loch Lomond, take the low road (A82 - some don't like it) into the Highlands till it gets higher, across Rannoch Moor, down Glen Coe - can't get much higher scenic quotient than that (depends on metric), to Fort William. Head up the Great Glen (stretches of canal towpath with excellent surface available), past the Commando Memorial (with the top of Ben Nevis in view if you're lucky), along the side of Loch Ness ~~~, to Inverness and the A9 up the coast to JoG.
1400km is a very reasonable distance to plan an end-to-end to, minimising time on A roads till Preston, and from Carlisle to Glasgow.
The A6 from Preston to Carlisle is fine (see above). After the Clyde the roads in Scotland are what they are. But this route avoids the 'fast' A9 from Perth to Inverness. And then from the Kessock Bridge onwards the A9 is OK, and there are sections which can be avoided (eg Alness to Tain) with minimal extra distance on parallel decent minor roads. For the last 160km (from Alness) the imperative to keep the route 'short' unfortunately means the rider misses out on solitude on offer on the road up Dornoch Firth and the Kyle of Sutherland to Lairg, past the (LEJOG iconic) Crask Inn, Strathnaver to Bettyhill and the north coast of Scotland - that much more attractive option is 40km longer.

FifeingEejit

  • Not Small
Re: LEJOG: 26 - 31 JULY 2020
« Reply #59 on: January 19, 2020, 03:59:40 pm »

Coming from the Netherlands, I am not very comfortable with riding close to the borders of busy roads while large lorries are passing closely by with relative high speeds (especially at night in the rain) ::-).

Having limited bicycling experience abroad (only PBP 2019) and thus non in England and Scotland, I am a little worried how many roads like this there will be, how save I will be and also what I can do more than the usual (sufficient lighting, reflective tape on wheels and wearing a reflective safety vest) to decrease risks apart form staying home :-).

Don't (unless it very suddenly makes sense to)
https://www.britishcycling.org.uk/cycletraining/article/ct20110110-cycletraining-Bitesize-Bikeability--Part-4--On-Road-Positioning-0

Even though it'll be high tourist season the scottish roads are likely to fit the standard tourist season pattern of manic after breakfast, before lunch, after lunch and before tea and deserted the rest of the time, and then mostly in a single direction (to the nearest "big" town)

Andy Corless

  • Doesn't take the p***, says it as it is!
Re: LEJOG: 26 - 31 JULY 2020
« Reply #60 on: January 21, 2020, 04:48:37 pm »


The first nights overnight control will be at the Mendip Activity Centre located just east of the village of Sandford. This is a lodge with 86 beds + further space for eating and erecting airbeds if necessary. This control was originally planned for Weston-Super-Mare but with the event having a much larger field than expected I've decided to look for bigger venues rather than limit entries. The event website will be updated soon when the better maps are ready.

As to the overall LEJOG distance, the signpost at Land's End states the distance to John o' Groats to be 874 miles. This signpost was apparently erected sometime during the 1950s; when the shortest distance calculated by road was 874 miles. In 1963, the shortest distance by road map was calculated to be 847 miles. Google walking distance calculates the shortest walking distance to be about 813 miles. It would appear the signpost simply hasn't been updated since first being erected.

The climbing figure written into the AUK calendar webpage is simply an estimate.

I'll be up in Scotland verifying the route between Inverness and John o' Groats next week after which the final route and distance will be moulded together.

LRM regulations allow for the route to be up to 5% over distance so by the book we're allowed up to 1470 km however, I don't intend the route to be any more than 1435 km.

Andy Corless
Organsier
LEJOG AUDAX 2020



FifeingEejit

  • Not Small
Re: LEJOG: 26 - 31 JULY 2020
« Reply #61 on: January 21, 2020, 05:25:55 pm »
surprisingly given Google's increasing amount of off road walking routes much to MR Team's delight...
The only diversion I had to bash in was to avoid crossing the Pentlands which added 1 mile to the shortest walking route.



Because this is mandatory route, in my view this gives the organiser more flexibility in avoiding unpleasant sections of road. The shortest possible route is around 1400km but the rules allow up to 1470km so this would allow for detours. There are some long sections in Scotland (north of Glasgow) where there is basically only one road, these are usually single carriageways such as the A82 over Rannoch Moor.

Bear in mind
"1.5 The distance of the course will be determined by the shortest distance
between controls capable of being cycled safely on road. The time
limits will be calculated by dividing this distance by the overall
minimum and maximum average speeds applicable."

No advice on what is "safe" and sections of the route have traffic densities that are both highly seasonal and highly weather dependent.


With that in mind:
Gretna Green (Dumfries & Galloway),
- B7076
Abington (South Lanarkshire),
- B7078 plus local roads
Paisley (Renfrewshire),
- Erskine bridge and the A82 (or the adjacent cycle route on the old road as far as Tarbert)
Crianlarich (Perthshire),
- A82
Fort William (Highland),
- A82
Inverness (Highland),
- A9 and the NCN sections in the vicinity
Dornoch (Highland)
- A9
Wick (Highland).
- A99
JOG

Re: LEJOG: 26 - 31 JULY 2020
« Reply #62 on: January 21, 2020, 09:58:30 pm »
Andy says: "The first night's overnight control will be at the Mendip Activity Centre located just east of the village of Sandford."
Have updated 'guess' to reflect this control (adds 3km to distance).
https://ridewithgps.com/routes/31764424?beta=false
With other tweaks that comes to 1420km + 13813m (RwGPS).

Andy Corless

  • Doesn't take the p***, says it as it is!
Re: LEJOG: 26 - 31 JULY 2020
« Reply #63 on: January 22, 2020, 02:36:52 pm »
Following on from yesterday's post, the Scottish section is planned to take the main roads although Google Walking suggests the shortest route uses the B-roads to the south of Loch Ness for the stretch between Fort Augustus and Inverness (riders had a choice of either that or the A82 on the Inverness 1200 last year). North of Inverness, Google Walking also suggests a 3 km short-cut along a country lane running west between Alness and Tain however, I doubt whether survivors after leaving Inverness would want to take any other route to John o' Groats than the A9/A99.

Andy Corless
Organsier
LEJOG AUDAX 2020

Re: LEJOG: 26 - 31 JULY 2020
« Reply #64 on: January 22, 2020, 05:18:58 pm »
23.3k + 138m from Alness to NW of Tain (A9/B9174 junction) on the A9. 20.2k + 171m via Scotsburn: decent road, minor till Badachonacher (6km) but fast and straightish afterwards. Michael Broadwith was no doubt faster staying on the A9 (with a following vehicle).

FifeingEejit

  • Not Small
Re: LEJOG: 26 - 31 JULY 2020
« Reply #65 on: January 22, 2020, 11:10:58 pm »
Google Walking suggests the shortest route uses the B-roads to the south of Loch Ness for the stretch between Fort Augustus and Inverness

Hm, it's also using the railway line between Laggan and Aberchalder.

I spotted lots of newish signage beside the A82 when I was up in December, and that it pointed onto the railway line but being a winter Saturday morning I hardly saw another vehicle so didn't feel the need to explore it. (And I was turning off at Invergarry which also minimizes it's usefulness)

Looks like it went up in 2017: https://goo.gl/maps/twMRPAnhA6vgDZSr9
As usual Sustrans don't give any idea of surface suitability, but it appears to be a useless gravel surface judging by pics from 2019: https://goo.gl/maps/EwUA4Tw2vJaAQ1SG9


Re: LEJOG: 26 - 31 JULY 2020
« Reply #66 on: January 23, 2020, 08:14:28 am »
Looks quite serviceable. I've been on worse on an audax
   Eddington  87 miles

Re: LEJOG: 26 - 31 JULY 2020
« Reply #67 on: January 23, 2020, 10:19:19 am »
Going north from Fort William, the towpath option from Banavie to Gairlochy (and then up to the Commando Memorial above Spean Bridge to join the main road) is an excellent surface and provides the opportunity to get off the A82 - riders will have had plenty of that from Corpach north and all the way up to Inverness.
The towpath from Bridge of Oich/Aberchalder to Fort Augustus is similarly a decent surface and about the same length/climb as the main road - again I found it a welcome change.
The short bit past Laggan isn't worth the effort.
So this: https://ridewithgps.com/routes/31801339?beta=false
I agree with Andy that riders heading for Inverness on Day 4 will not be able properly to appreciate the scenery to the south side of Loch Ness and prefer to put up with 50 (more) km of the A82.
I'd observe that using Inverness as a control means riders can't take the connoisseurs' route over the hill after Drumnadrochit and directly to Beauly and Dingwall (and the back road to Evanton/Alness) but are consigned to the dull and busy A9 across Kessock Bridge, the Black Isle and the Cromarty Firth bridge. The main road route is 4km longer (same climb).

FifeingEejit

  • Not Small
Re: LEJOG: 26 - 31 JULY 2020
« Reply #68 on: January 23, 2020, 11:45:50 am »
Going north from Fort William, the towpath option from Banavie to Gairlochy (and then up to the Commando Memorial above Spean Bridge to join the main road) is an excellent surface and provides the opportunity to get off the A82 - riders will have had plenty of that from Corpach north and all the way up to Inverness.
The towpath from Bridge of Oich/Aberchalder to Fort Augustus is similarly a decent surface and about the same length/climb as the main road - again I found it a welcome change.
The short bit past Laggan isn't worth the effort.
So this: https://ridewithgps.com/routes/31801339?beta=false
I agree with Andy that riders heading for Inverness on Day 4 will not be able properly to appreciate the scenery to the south side of Loch Ness and prefer to put up with 50 (more) km of the A82.
I'd observe that using Inverness as a control means riders can't take the connoisseurs' route over the hill after Drumnadrochit and directly to Beauly and Dingwall (and the back road to Evanton/Alness) but are consigned to the dull and busy A9 across Kessock Bridge, the Black Isle and the Cromarty Firth bridge. The main road route is 4km longer (same climb).

The section from Longman to Tore can and should be dodged using the bridge cycle track and old road, the link between the 2 is unfortunately a bit vauge.
The problem with that section is it's the only reasonable way into Inverness from most of the Black Isle so is constantly busy.

I've always gone round by Dingwall and over the Struie from Evanton when heading that way, but there is A9 alternatives round to Tain


Andy Corless

  • Doesn't take the p***, says it as it is!
Re: LEJOG: 26 - 31 JULY 2020
« Reply #69 on: January 23, 2020, 04:15:02 pm »
"I'd observe that using Inverness as a control means riders can't take the connoisseurs' route over the hill after Drumnadrochit and directly to Beauly and Dingwall (and the back road to Evanton/Alness) but are consigned to the dull and busy A9 across Kessock Bridge, the Black Isle and the Cromarty Firth bridge. The main road route is 4km longer (same climb)."

Obviously with the control being in Inverness it prevents riders from taking the better option from Drumnadrochit across the Muir of Ord to Dingwall however, there's a chance that the route would have been considerably under distance anyway.

"23.3k + 138m from Alness to NW of Tain (A9/B9174 junction) on the A9. 20.2k + 171m via Scotsburn: decent road, minor till Badachonacher (6km) but fast and straightish afterwards. Michael Broadwith was no doubt faster staying on the A9 (with a following vehicle)."

Physically, I suspect those leaving Inverness heading for JOG during daylight hours will opt for the 3km short-cut (via unlit country lanes) whilst those that are riding through the dark will opt for the A9. The "official mandatory route" will of course have to use the short-cut via the lanes in order to comply with the regulations.

Andy Corless
Organiser
LEJOG Audax 2020

Re: LEJOG: 26 - 31 JULY 2020
« Reply #70 on: January 24, 2020, 03:42:53 pm »
Comparison is fairly easy... one is a fully catered ride, where all you have to worry about is to ride from A to B every day, the other is a ride where you have to worry about everything else too (logistics, luggage, mechanicals along the way, as well as collecting receipts for validation... )
And of course you are riding the same route in half the time, so roughly twice the daily mileage

Another big difference is the cost. Today I was sent an email from the organisers of RAB warning me that prices will rise after 31st Jan and that 80% of places have now all gone - they currently sell for 1799GBP a pop - see details https://www.rideacrossbritain.com/packages/individual-entry/!

Re: LEJOG: 26 - 31 JULY 2020
« Reply #71 on: January 24, 2020, 04:28:56 pm »
Comparison is fairly easy... one is a fully catered ride, where all you have to worry about is to ride from A to B every day, the other is a ride where you have to worry about everything else too (logistics, luggage, mechanicals along the way, as well as collecting receipts for validation... )
And of course you are riding the same route in half the time, so roughly twice the daily mileage

Another big difference is the cost. Today I was sent an email from the organisers of RAB warning me that prices will rise after 31st Jan and that 80% of places have now all gone - they currently sell for 1799GBP a pop - see details https://www.rideacrossbritain.com/packages/individual-entry/!
a big chunk of the extra cost is extra time. Riding in 9 days means twice as many overnight stops. If RAB ran at randonneu pace it could be less than £1000, but I guess most people dont want to do 300km every day.
   Eddington  87 miles

Re: LEJOG: 26 - 31 JULY 2020
« Reply #72 on: January 24, 2020, 04:37:13 pm »
Comparison is fairly easy... one is a fully catered ride, where all you have to worry about is to ride from A to B every day, the other is a ride where you have to worry about everything else too (logistics, luggage, mechanicals along the way, as well as collecting receipts for validation... )
And of course you are riding the same route in half the time, so roughly twice the daily mileage

Another big difference is the cost. Today I was sent an email from the organisers of RAB warning me that prices will rise after 31st Jan and that 80% of places have now all gone - they currently sell for 1799GBP a pop - see details https://www.rideacrossbritain.com/packages/individual-entry/!
a big chunk of the extra cost is extra time. Riding in 9 days means twice as many overnight stops. If RAB ran at randonneu pace it could be less than £1000, but I guess most people dont want to do 300km every day.

I thought they used tents on RAB, £200 a night for camping.
If you don’t make time for exercise now, sooner or later you’ll need to make time for ill health.

LMT

Re: LEJOG: 26 - 31 JULY 2020
« Reply #73 on: January 24, 2020, 04:53:11 pm »
Comparison is fairly easy... one is a fully catered ride, where all you have to worry about is to ride from A to B every day, the other is a ride where you have to worry about everything else too (logistics, luggage, mechanicals along the way, as well as collecting receipts for validation... )
And of course you are riding the same route in half the time, so roughly twice the daily mileage

Another big difference is the cost. Today I was sent an email from the organisers of RAB warning me that prices will rise after 31st Jan and that 80% of places have now all gone - they currently sell for 1799GBP a pop - see details https://www.rideacrossbritain.com/packages/individual-entry/!

A fool and their money,..

Re: LEJOG: 26 - 31 JULY 2020
« Reply #74 on: January 24, 2020, 04:55:25 pm »
Comparison is fairly easy... one is a fully catered ride, where all you have to worry about is to ride from A to B every day, the other is a ride where you have to worry about everything else too (logistics, luggage, mechanicals along the way, as well as collecting receipts for validation... )
And of course you are riding the same route in half the time, so roughly twice the daily mileage

Another big difference is the cost. Today I was sent an email from the organisers of RAB warning me that prices will rise after 31st Jan and that 80% of places have now all gone - they currently sell for 1799GBP a pop - see details https://www.rideacrossbritain.com/packages/individual-entry/!
a big chunk of the extra cost is extra time. Riding in 9 days means twice as many overnight stops. If RAB ran at randonneu pace it could be less than £1000, but I guess most people dont want to do 300km every day.

I thought they used tents on RAB, £200 a night for camping.
And food, transport, support, etc
   Eddington  87 miles