Author Topic: A new Mercian (mine) is born  (Read 5296 times)

Re: A new Mercian (mine) is born
« Reply #50 on: September 06, 2019, 05:03:34 pm »
If one uses the Campagnolo front changer setting tool the changer will be close to the teeth on the big ring.

I suspect Mercian did indeed use that tool, I'll see how it works out in practice this weekend

Hmmm... not sure I actually want to ride it until the front derailleur is moved up a bit - the tips of the teeth of the outer chain ring are actually hitting the bottom of the cage in some positions. Not sure that the limits are set correctly either, for the cage to be able to go over that far.  Bit of a poor show from Mercian :-(

[click to expand images]



Old enough to know better, but young enough to do it anyway

Re: A new Mercian (mine) is born
« Reply #51 on: September 07, 2019, 07:06:37 am »
It’ does look a tad low, 10 second job to move it up a bit.
Personally, I’d loosen the attachment bolt just a little, then use a screwdriver or similar as a lever to push the mechanism up.

Re: A new Mercian (mine) is born
« Reply #52 on: September 07, 2019, 07:29:27 am »
You’ll likely have to release the cable first.
L'enfer, c'est les autos.

Re: A new Mercian (mine) is born
« Reply #53 on: September 07, 2019, 07:40:31 am »
the cable ought to be slack when the small chainring is selected.  Np need to release the pinch bolt (which risks fraying the cable) a turn or two on the barrel adjuster will make enough slack for the (small) FD height adjustment required.

  Possibly the paint is still a bit soft and the bolt for the FD has lost tension because the paint has squidged out of the joint slightly, and the FD has been pulled down slightly by cable tension; it happens often.  Cable tension is very high with campag front mechs anyway and when shifting onto the big ring with ulltrashift it is easy to go one click too far and leave the cable under monster tension.

As a rule all new builds ought to have a bolt check after about 100 miles or so. You can largely avoid the necessity for this by scraping paint off stuff before it is fitted and/or grossly overtightening stuff, but that raises other issues.

cheers

Re: A new Mercian (mine) is born
« Reply #54 on: September 07, 2019, 08:46:15 am »
Thanks for the feedback, whilst it sounds like a pretty straightforward job to sort, think I may get my LBS to take a look, as I don't trust myself to not muck something up and damage the paint or something.
Old enough to know better, but young enough to do it anyway

Re: A new Mercian (mine) is born
« Reply #55 on: September 08, 2019, 08:48:10 am »
I remember it being an absolute mare to set the FD height on my old Hewitt.  The (clamp-on) front mech slipped until I really mullered it down.  Turned out the paint was a bit soft and the paint was slipping over the metal, rather than the clamp slipping over the paint.  When I removed it years later there were great welts in the paint.  There can be a lot of tension involved.
Never tell me the odds.

Re: A new Mercian (mine) is born
« Reply #56 on: September 08, 2019, 11:06:46 am »
I understand new paint can be soft, touch up paint definitely takes several months to dry off properly.

Scrapping off the paint sounds a bit drastic, maybe just sand off the top clear layer  or use a bit of chalk for grip.

And/or roughen up the inside of the clamp.

Re: A new Mercian (mine) is born
« Reply #57 on: September 08, 2019, 02:56:44 pm »
Fixie!
L'enfer, c'est les autos.

zigzag

  • unfuckwithable
Re: A new Mercian (mine) is born
« Reply #58 on: September 08, 2019, 03:27:53 pm »
1x is another option (until the paint hardens), traditional bike with a modern twist.

Re: A new Mercian (mine) is born
« Reply #59 on: September 09, 2019, 09:18:54 pm »
Posted some more pics in the Members Gallery

A local bike shop (Beeline, Oxford) had a go at adjusting the front derailleur (moved it up a bit, mostly). Think it seemed okay on a short 26 mile ride at the weekend, though I did drop the chain once (at quite a slow cadence when slower to a stop, so may have been partially my fault) and a few times was hesitant to change up into the big ring (only partially picked-up), so I think perhaps the limit screws also need adjusting?
Old enough to know better, but young enough to do it anyway

Re: A new Mercian (mine) is born
« Reply #60 on: September 09, 2019, 09:53:55 pm »
One very small suggestion from me. I’d suggest obtaining some cable /frame protector thingumies to stop the gear cables wearing the paint on the head tube. A friend of mine recently built up a Vincitore, and the rubbing became evident quite soon. BBB I think do some that don’t need the cable disconnected.
By the way, this isn’t a Mercian specific issue, it applies to any frame without cable guides actually on the lower head tube lug.

Like this?

Old enough to know better, but young enough to do it anyway

Re: A new Mercian (mine) is born
« Reply #61 on: September 10, 2019, 08:07:06 am »
One very small suggestion from me. I’d suggest obtaining some cable /frame protector thingumies to stop the gear cables wearing the paint on the head tube. A friend of mine recently built up a Vincitore, and the rubbing became evident quite soon. BBB I think do some that don’t need the cable disconnected.
By the way, this isn’t a Mercian specific issue, it applies to any frame without cable guides actually on the lower head tube lug.

Like this?

Absolutely, yes.

Ref your front mech, I always use a chain catcher just in case.



Re: A new Mercian (mine) is born
« Reply #62 on: September 10, 2019, 02:10:26 pm »

Absolutely, yes.

Ref your front mech, I always use a chain catcher just in case.


It might be an idea to get a chain catcher - any you'd recommend? Unfortunately the Campagnolo one is black (and quite expensive for what it is), like so many components these days, but if needs must...
Old enough to know better, but young enough to do it anyway

JonB

  • Granny Ring ... Yes Please!
Re: A new Mercian (mine) is born
« Reply #63 on: September 10, 2019, 02:35:27 pm »
It might be an idea to get a chain catcher - any you'd recommend? Unfortunately the Campagnolo one is black (and quite expensive for what it is), like so many components these days, but if needs must...

Dog Fang https://www.chainreactioncycles.com/deda-elementi-dog-fang-chain-catcher-/rp-prod84217

Re: A new Mercian (mine) is born
« Reply #64 on: September 10, 2019, 02:38:48 pm »
[quote author=Oxford_Guy link=topic=112818.msg2426439#msg2426439 date=1568121026

It might be an idea to get a chain catcher - any you'd recommend? Unfortunately the Campagnolo one is black (and quite expensive for what it is), like so many components these days, but if needs must...
[/quote]
Jump Stop

Re: A new Mercian (mine) is born
« Reply #65 on: September 10, 2019, 04:52:43 pm »
Thanks for the suggestions for a chain catcher Paul H and JonB, though I was thinking more of something that would attach to the braze-on mount, as was trying to avoid having bands attached around the seat tube on this bike.

Old enough to know better, but young enough to do it anyway

Re: A new Mercian (mine) is born
« Reply #66 on: September 10, 2019, 05:54:34 pm »
I don’t know if such a thing exists, though you can get some that attach to the BB if you want to avoid a band.  The reason I like the Jump Stop is you can set the mech to over shift and the chain can’t go anywhere other than onto the ring, helps when you’ve left it a bit late and do a panic shift.

Re: A new Mercian (mine) is born
« Reply #67 on: September 10, 2019, 06:05:51 pm »
I don’t know if such a thing exists, though you can get some that attach to the BB if you want to avoid a band.  The reason I like the Jump Stop is you can set the mech to over shift and the chain can’t go anywhere other than onto the ring, helps when you’ve left it a bit late and do a panic shift.

I was thinking more this sort of thing:

https://www.tredz.co.uk/.K-Edge-Road-braze-on-double-chain-catcher_55173.htm?sku=153478

https://www.wiggle.co.uk/token-tk375-chain-drop-catcher-for-front-road-mechs/

Old enough to know better, but young enough to do it anyway

Re: A new Mercian (mine) is born
« Reply #68 on: September 10, 2019, 06:26:23 pm »
FWIW, I use the deda dog fang.  Possibly less noticeable, lighter, cheaper than K-edge or similar? You could probably mount the fang on some 'helicopter' type tape to protect the paint, if this is an issue.  Also, chain stay protection?

edit. my cs is a triple and frame a darker colour - so I guess fang is further down and 'blends' in.
Destroying rainforest for economic gain is like burning a Renaissance painting to cook a meal.  EOW.

Re: A new Mercian (mine) is born
« Reply #69 on: September 10, 2019, 10:30:10 pm »
FWIW, I use the deda dog fang.  Possibly less noticeable, lighter, cheaper than K-edge or similar? You could probably mount the fang on some 'helicopter' type tape to protect the paint, if this is an issue.  Also, chain stay protection?

Bit wary of the helicopter tape pulling the lacquer off the frame when changing it, or does that not happen?

Have been considering some sort of sacrificial chain stay protection, perhaps on of those clear, slightly padded protectors?
Old enough to know better, but young enough to do it anyway

Re: A new Mercian (mine) is born
« Reply #70 on: September 11, 2019, 10:32:50 am »
Googling around 'helitape and paint damage', does seem that there are a few instances of problems - perhaps it depends on tape brand / how well the paint has been applied/finished.   I still have a retro plastic Shimano Sharkfin on the chainstay on my steel bike, not tried anything else.  Interestingly on another bike without chainstay protection, the white paint area has discoloured with oil stain.
Destroying rainforest for economic gain is like burning a Renaissance painting to cook a meal.  EOW.

Re: A new Mercian (mine) is born
« Reply #71 on: September 11, 2019, 11:03:24 am »
BTW, as reported in the Members' Bikes Gallery section, where I also posted some more photos of the bike,  I did actually take it out for a short 25 mile shakedown ride with a friend on Saturday (after fitting the second bottle cage).

The ride quality is fantastic, not harsh, not noodly - think this is partly the frame, partly the Veloflex Master 25 tyres (and latex tubes) - despite being skinny, the latter give a beautifully smooth ride.

Acceleration is ludicrously quicker than on my Hewitt Cheviot and it seems to fly up hills. Shifting at the rear was impeccable.

On the downside, think some adjustments are needed:

1) Whilst I found the Gilles Berthoud Galibier saddle to be fine and it didn't give me any comfort problems, I did keep on finding myself moving forward on it - probably need to move the rails forward on the seat clamp a bit, it is quite far back currently, will try in 5mm steps.

2) When I rest my hands on the hoods (as I would certainly do in a group ride, to have quick access to gears and brakes), my arms are almost (but not quite) locked, think the reach is a tad too far, and I did have some neck stiffness after the ride (though I am a bit prone to that). Moving the saddle forward may help a bit, but I suspect I should have gone for an 80mm Nitto Pearl stem instead of a 90mm one - on the bike the latter is actually closer to 100mm - this is a bit of a known issue with this stem, but I thought the short reach Nitto M106 NAS bars would compensate enough. In the drops and elsewhere on the bars it's okay. Bit annoying to have to change a quill stem, though, especially as Mercian did a very good job with the bar tape and mounting the Ergos (and getting the relatively tight curve of the shallow drop bars to fit into the stem)

3) I dropped the chain once, although that was when trying to change down to the small ring at fairly low cadence (was a bit of a last minute thing, when I had to stop because had a fly in my eye). No damage to paint, though. Also a few times it halfheartedly tried to pick up the chain when changing up to the big ring, but failed. Think the front derailleur needs more adjustment - the limit screws, perhaps (although the cage positions at either end look okay)? When it worked, which was most of the time, though, the front shifting was surprisingly quick, considering the 16T jump, and the Ergos make it easy to shift up a cog or two at the back quickly afterwards.

Other than that it was excellent.
Old enough to know better, but young enough to do it anyway

Re: A new Mercian (mine) is born
« Reply #72 on: September 11, 2019, 12:37:17 pm »
IMHO you are about to go completely the wrong way with your adjustments. If your arms are 'locked' this suggests you have weight on your hands.

 If you have weight on your hands and arms when pedalling normally (it is different when you are not pedalling), this is a very clear sign that you already have the saddle too far forwards, and moving it further forwards will just make everything worse, comfort wise.

When the riding position is correct (for comfort), you should be able to pedal normally with just your fingertips on the handlebars, and just the  merest pressure passing through them.

If you have significant load passing through your arms than this can lead to all kinds of tension problems in the neck and shoulders, leading in turn to a stiff(er) neck, headaches, you name it.

I'd suggest that you try adjusting the saddle tilt a little and that you try moving the saddle backwards until you don't feel load passing through your arms any more. Then buy a stem to put the hoods  in the right (comfortable) place.  Very possibly the best handlebar position  will be higher and shorter than (current) aesthetics suggest.

cheers

Re: A new Mercian (mine) is born
« Reply #73 on: September 11, 2019, 01:02:56 pm »
IMHO you are about to go completely the wrong way with your adjustments. If your arms are 'locked' this suggests you have weight on your hands.

 If you have weight on your hands and arms when pedalling normally (it is different when you are not pedalling), this is a very clear sign that you already have the saddle too far forwards, and moving it further forwards will just make everything worse, comfort wise.

When the riding position is correct (for comfort), you should be able to pedal normally with just your fingertips on the handlebars, and just the  merest pressure passing through them.

If you have significant load passing through your arms than this can lead to all kinds of tension problems in the neck and shoulders, leading in turn to a stiff(er) neck, headaches, you name it.

I'd suggest that you try adjusting the saddle tilt a little and that you try moving the saddle backwards until you don't feel load passing through your arms any more. Then buy a stem to put the hoods  in the right (comfortable) place.  Very possibly the best handlebar position  will be higher and shorter than (current) aesthetics suggest.

Thanks for the feedback, though by "locked" all I really meant was that I have to reach so far when on the hoods that my arms are almost fully straight, with very little bend in the elbow, simply because the reach is quite far - I didn't necessarily mean to imply that they were "locked" to support my weight (which is also why I said "(not quite) locked"). I will check again, though, to see if I do have weight on my hands when pedaling normally.
Old enough to know better, but young enough to do it anyway

Re: A new Mercian (mine) is born
« Reply #74 on: September 11, 2019, 01:16:00 pm »
however much weight you have on your hands at the moment, it will be increased if you move the saddle forwards; it is really not at all the right thing to do if the only problem is that your reach is too long, and has a very different effect from getting a shorter stem.  It is, however, very easy to do, unlike changing a quill stem.

cheers