Author Topic: Stoker vs Pilot  (Read 3806 times)

Re: Stoker vs Pilot
« Reply #25 on: August 29, 2019, 11:38:33 am »
I once did a fairly long ride (500 milesin 24hrs)on the front at 6ft1,12st with my son 6'5 14st on the back without problems.Exit Stage Left may have a picture.

You two were close enough in size that putting the big bloke on the back would be no trouble and might have been an advantage.

Rod's told me that his son was a student at the time, so they might have been riding the tandem before Rod became the smaller one.

Re: Stoker vs Pilot
« Reply #26 on: August 29, 2019, 12:21:48 pm »
We had ridden tandem together before but not between Peter age 12 and 20 (the year before the 500) and only then in one 100 TT and one 12hr TT and a few 10s. The tandem was designed to as near as possible replicate each riders solo bike position.

Re: Stoker vs Pilot
« Reply #27 on: August 29, 2019, 01:57:49 pm »
That explains why it's not as 'soft' a record as it seems. The Brabbins have held the mixed 24 record for a while as well.

The ladies' record is an interesting one. It might be held by Charlotte and Julian OTP, but they set out to do an Audax performance, and that's reflected in the distance. I remember that they picked up speed towards the end, and their finish TK was packing up as they arrived. Charlotte went ballistic, I've still got the video somewhere. That's a record that's well within reach.

Re: Stoker vs Pilot
« Reply #28 on: August 30, 2019, 07:22:53 am »
I have heard it said that the best stoker is one who doesn't know how to ride a bike, and will therefore not attempt to steer from the back.

Yes and no. Blind persons make excellent stokers since they will always have a neutral behaviour, no matter what happens around the bicycle. Non-blind stokers who don't know how to ride a bike can be dangerous as they can have panic reactions and try to lean the bike on the wrong side, while experienced cyclists are less likely to panic.

Overall, I would say that the most important thing is mutual trust between pilot and stoker. On our tandem, we have a third brake which is actuated from the rear handlebar. We use this brake only to gently slow down during long descents, never for emergency stopping. Using this brake inappropriately, like during sharp  cornering, would certainly result in a crash.  I (pilot) am perfectly confident that S (stoker) will never use the third brake unless being told to do so. On the other hand, every time I had a tandem ride with someone who wants to try something new, I disconnected the brake cable beforehand.

A

Re: Stoker vs Pilot
« Reply #29 on: August 30, 2019, 09:09:03 am »
That explains why it's not as 'soft' a record as it seems. The Brabbins have held the mixed 24 record for a while as well.

The ladies' record is an interesting one. It might be held by Charlotte and Julian OTP, but they set out to do an Audax performance, and that's reflected in the distance. I remember that they picked up speed towards the end, and their finish TK was packing up as they arrived. Charlotte went ballistic, I've still got the video somewhere. That's a record that's well within reach.

The Brabbins do have the Mixed 24 record with 464 miles, putting just 1.6 miles onto the Boons ride of 1986

There is no record listed for the Women's Tandem 24 hour currently. Similar to the End to End...

Re: Stoker vs Pilot
« Reply #30 on: August 30, 2019, 11:10:52 am »
I used to see Dave Brabbin in the lanes around Eccleston, as he lives in Wigan, and worked near Preston. He's probably retired by now. Both he and Eileen seem to be active in nature conservation, on the 'Flashes' that abound in Wigan.

It surprises me that there's no 24 Ladies tandem record. As I said, Charlotte was very annoyed when they arrived at a closing Timekeeper. They'd been adopting an Audax style of riding, and treated Prees Heath as a pitstop, so it was a surprise when they got the bit between their teeth on the finish circuit. There's a video of course, the finish wasn't as envisaged, due to multiple expletives. So I just did a music video treatment.

I don't think the 24 requires a 'standard' to register, but LEJOG does. My mind is now drifting off, considering who could pilot and stoke a female tandem contender. Murray/ Spearman would be the most powerful combo, but both are solo prospects.


Re: Stoker vs Pilot
« Reply #31 on: August 30, 2019, 02:17:51 pm »


Well, they are in the results - I wonder why it isn't comp record? Perhaps they didn't apply in time?

Re: Stoker vs Pilot
« Reply #32 on: August 30, 2019, 02:42:53 pm »
I remember the day well. Andy Southworth succumbed to a bit of sunstroke, and I lent him my rather disreputable Lidl 'Buff' copy. They might have made 400 if he'd avoided that.

The Barnes/Norman tandem was off last, and as I say, they weren't expected to make it past the TK at the Cock O' Barton, so the control at Coddington was packing up as they arrived. Charlotte's robust response was a bit of a culture clash. They'd achieved their aim of 5 AUK points for getting beyond 500km, so they just moved on.

For me it's a de-facto record.

Re: Stoker vs Pilot
« Reply #33 on: August 30, 2019, 05:39:40 pm »
I was the chief timekeeper for the Mersey 24 when Barnes/Norman did their ride.At the finish and again a few weeks later by email I advised they needed to claim the record and told them how to,but they never did.

Re: Stoker vs Pilot
« Reply #34 on: August 30, 2019, 07:38:43 pm »
Back to OT I am sure you have got this all wrong. The woman is on the back because in that position she is in total control of proceedings and can make life sheer hell for the pilot if she is so inclined. On the front she can only direct what direction the tandem is going. On the back she can direct where the relationship is going and has a (or both) free hand(s). Wearing bib shorts is only a limited protection against a determined female stoker; DAHIKT
The reality about weight and size is that the steadiness of a stoker makes far more difference than size weight or strength per se. I have ridden with my first MiL  who was a little scrap and rode so steadily that you didn't even know she was there. I have ridden with my BiL when he weighed 120kgs (I weigh about 85). You certainly couldn't ignore the mass but he was so steady it made no difference (not being a cyclist might have helped in his case ). I had a regular non-seeing stoker who was about my weight and who wriggled and jiggled like anything towards the end of a ride when his bum was getting sore. A lot of the other pilots refused to ride with him, he was so offputting!