Author Topic: Walking a long route such as Cotswold Way - hints tips advice?  (Read 1426 times)

Re: Walking a long route such as Cotswold Way - hints tips advice?
« Reply #25 on: September 03, 2019, 12:10:44 pm »
My experience of long distance walking is that it generally takes at least two to three days for your body to adjust to the back to back days of walking if you are not used to it.   So I would aim to cover less mileage in those first days then gradually increase it over however many days you decide to cover the route.

Your daily walks are much less distance than the daily average you are planning to walk so I suggest you try two back to back days of 20 miles each, over a weekend and see how you get on.  The Lyke Wake walk over the North York Moors is approx 40 miles so would be a suitable practice run, if you don't want to do something local.  There is the Lion pub at Blakey for a half way overnight stop.

Early breakfasts and starts, with long lunches and breaks, can also make longer days and distances more pleasant.  Remember also, that you don't need to eat at your destination, you could stop an hour or two earlier for a late afternoon / early evening meal before continuing on to your destination.

With lightweight gear and using pubs and B&Bs you have no need to carry more than a daysack of about 20-30 litres either.  The days of heavy backpacks are long gone; so don't be tempted to take a large backpack with space for lots of gear. 

I think you can still get Sorbothane footbeds for cushioning if wearing boots but my preference has been for lighter footwear since about the late 80's.  Karrimor with KSBs started that kind of trend in the early 80's.  I'll wear approach shoes outside of pathless heavily boggy or rocky or glacial areas and / or winter conditions.   Ones without a goretex liner breath better, dry better and generally work better.  If it's boggy or wet enough the water will come over the top anyway and all the liner does it keep that in, and make your feet sweat more. I still have a pair of leather boots but reserve them for bog and / or winter mud.

road-runner

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Re: Walking a long route such as Cotswold Way - hints tips advice?
« Reply #26 on: September 03, 2019, 12:56:52 pm »
... Karrimor with KSBs ...

My mountain leadership training instructor was a Welsh chap who didn't like these new lightweight KSBs; it was in the '80s. When someone else doing their training alongside me asked about KSBs, the instructor said in his broad Welsh accent, "These can be worn, if you want, but only to do gardening in."

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
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Re: Walking a long route such as Cotswold Way - hints tips advice?
« Reply #27 on: September 03, 2019, 01:02:42 pm »
There seems to be ongoing snobbery about 'proper leather walking boots' being the only ones. It's bollocks, of course, lighter weight ones are just as good. I wear Meindl ones (admittedly leather) and they're great. They do have a Goretex liner and I'd agree that, tbh, they're not much value. Proper rain and your feet will get wet regardless. Cyclists, of course, should have substantial tolerance for rain and being wet anyway.
!nataS pihsroW

Re: Walking a long route such as Cotswold Way - hints tips advice?
« Reply #28 on: September 03, 2019, 01:21:58 pm »
... Karrimor with KSBs ...

My mountain leadership training instructor was a Welsh chap who didn't like these new lightweight KSBs; it was in the '80s. When someone else doing their training alongside me asked about KSBs, the instructor said in his broad Welsh accent, "These can be worn, if you want, but only to do gardening in."

Yeah, my mate turned up with a pair in what would have been 80 or 81. In those days we walked on Kinder Scout (it being local and easy to get to) most weekends, and as he admited they weren't the best idea for peat bog.  We did take the piss but if we were on Mam Tor or further south in the White Peak then he laughed as we clomped about in our Army and Navy leather boots, smeared in dubbin.

I've been a big fan of fell running shoes for a while now.  Super lightweight, your feet don't overheat, excellent grippy shoes, and they dry pretty well.  Even in the Alps you'll see fast walkers wearing them, and putting on flexible crampons on for the snow patches that remain on the high passes in summer. Combined with walking poles, it works pretty well in steep terrain.

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
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Re: Walking a long route such as Cotswold Way - hints tips advice?
« Reply #29 on: September 03, 2019, 02:56:49 pm »
When I walked about 1/3 of the Pembs coastal path last year, I did quite a lot of training. I was planning to walk about 10 miles a day on average and do the lot, but on about day 6 I pulled a calf muscle and stopped.

Things I would do differently:-

1. Be 3 stones lighter (I am, pretty much).

2. Don't be frightened of using public transport, if it exists, to get you from and back to your stopping point each night, if your B & B is not actually on the route. There was one very cheap pub/accommodation spot in Pembs that was within a 10 mile bus ride of over 40 miles of the coastal path.

I was very pleased with my kit. I used a lightweight Osprey rucksack, quick-dry shirts & underpants, Berghaus fleeces etc. My walking boots were very good Altbergs that I bought specially. A good hat to keep the ultraviolet of the pate is also essential.

As it happened, my pulled muscle, which was a niggle rather than serious, was just about painful enough that I was worried it would get worse, and I have previous with a major calf muscle tear. It proved to be a blessing in disguise as once I got home, the really hot spell of late June weather started, through which walking all day would have been taxing to the point of being dangerous. Jan and I went back to Pembrokeshire and spent a week on the beach.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

Re: Walking a long route such as Cotswold Way - hints tips advice?
« Reply #30 on: September 04, 2019, 06:40:35 pm »
Training for frequent steep climbs seems in order?

"Anyone who is reasonably fit can walk the Cotswold Way although many walkers are surprised at the frequency of steep climbs. The route is very well way-marked so finding your way is easy. However, it is always a good idea to take a guidebook or map."

From their website: https://www.nationaltrail.co.uk/cotswold-way/information

Vince

  • Can't climb; won't climb
Re: Walking a long route such as Cotswold Way - hints tips advice?
« Reply #31 on: September 04, 2019, 07:14:51 pm »
Arrange to live on the route so you can get a good night's sleep in your own bed and wash all your kit. ;)
216km from Marsh Gibbon

Jaded

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Re: Walking a long route such as Cotswold Way - hints tips advice?
« Reply #32 on: September 04, 2019, 08:16:55 pm »
;D

We are quite used to climbs, as we live near the escarpment.  :thumbsup:
If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.

Re: Walking a long route such as Cotswold Way - hints tips advice?
« Reply #33 on: September 05, 2019, 12:35:36 pm »

I like to wear a pair of thin socks (bamboo) under my proper boot socks.  This doesn't suit everyone.  Give it a try and see how you feel.

This. It helps to prevent blisters. I use very fine wool socks next to the skin.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

Re: Walking a long route such as Cotswold Way - hints tips advice?
« Reply #34 on: September 06, 2019, 10:12:55 am »
I do a lot of long distance walking, (last one was on the Scottish National Trail  470 miles the length of Scotland from Kirk Yetholm to Cape Wrath https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L7yYDkTo8Ug  which I did over the course of 5 weeks ).

Good suggestions on the above thread, in addition to the suggestions I would take if I were you ;

https://www.compeed.co.uk/product/blister/

Ensure your backpack loaded, does not weigh more than 7-9 kg presume it will be only a day sack and train with a loaded pack two thirds of the maximum distance for a section with the loaded pack

two very good apps from OS which I use:

https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/os-maps/id978307846

https://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/shop/os-locate/

Take a subscription out with OS Maps, https://osmaps.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/  plot the route on the on-line OS Map;

 

print out, then throw away when you have done the section for example start of Cotswold Way which you could print out section by section and then throw away.


While your sitting at home you can also do a 3d fly through of the whole route and you can access the relevant offline map and route on your phone if you need a precise bearing



Good luck enjoy your walk