Author Topic: Managing Junctions  (Read 797 times)

fd3

Managing Junctions
« on: September 01, 2019, 09:26:58 pm »
My last couple of utility rides I have tried the speedmachine - enjoyed the comfortable position and the freewheel, but junctions are a bit of russian roulette!  I'm finding myself doing the car-driver edging into traffic (and hoping they don't run me over for being in the way, as is their right as motorists).
Is this a developed skill, or is this just a feature of laidbacks?
If I were on a highracer would the problem remain?
Is this just something I struggle with as a non-driver, but any experienced car user would have the knack already?
[/I could be wrong]

ElyDave

  • Royal and Ancient Polar Bear Society member 263583
Re: Managing Junctions
« Reply #1 on: September 01, 2019, 09:34:11 pm »
The "gently edge forward" is one technique, I also apply the "approach the junction at an angle" trick, to lessen the effect of any boom. Not quite as bad on the cruzbike as the M5 which is very laid back.

“Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.” –Charles Dickens

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Managing Junctions
« Reply #2 on: September 01, 2019, 10:09:01 pm »
Ah yes, the *real* recumbent visibility issue.

I just behave as I do when driving a car.  Edge forward a bit, and sometimes wait for a vehicle in the right-turn lane blocking my view to move.  It's never really been a problem, though you have to do it more on more laid-back machines.  Steering that doesn't prevent you from sitting upright helps, too.

If you don't drive, I can see how this would be a bit of a culture shock.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Managing Junctions
« Reply #3 on: September 01, 2019, 10:30:08 pm »
Firstly take primary position at the junction / lane you need to be in.  I tend to sit up but keep my right foot clipped and crank position primed to go, left foot down.   I usually get enough of the WTF is that effect that I get let out much quicker than on my road bike.  If heavy traffic I'll tend to hold my position in traffic / primary rather than further over to the left in secondary etc. Change into the gear you'll need to get going before you stop.  Depending on how laid back you are it can be hard to see what's coming along the road you are joining, before you get there. So you'll often have to stop first where as on a road bike you may have been able to roll on, being head first.
If you don’t make time for exercise now, sooner or later you’ll need to make time for ill health.

Re: Managing Junctions
« Reply #4 on: September 02, 2019, 03:19:52 am »
I'm on a bent trike with hub gears so junctions are easier than if I was on a bike.
No balance issues and the ability to get the right gear at will.
T junctions aren't bad, I just edge forward enough to see enough to time the start right.
It's Y junctions where I have to look at around 45 degree backwards that I find hard.
It's too far to twist around to see what's coming from behind but not enough to use my mirrors on.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Managing Junctions
« Reply #5 on: September 02, 2019, 01:23:04 pm »
It's Y junctions where I have to look at around 45 degree backwards that I find hard.
It's too far to twist around to see what's coming from behind but not enough to use my mirrors on.

Again, this is worse the more reclined the riding position.  Sometimes you have to re-position yourself at a weird angle to get a half-decent view.  Sometimes I make more use of hearing than is entirely safe.  Note that van drivers have the same sort of problem (mirror pointing the wrong way, direct view blocked by the body of the vehicle), unless there's someone in the passenger seat who can stick their head out of the window: They just have to edge out slowly and hope any approaching traffic reacts accordingly.

Share-use pavements where you're continually giving way to traffic in that blind spot are best avoided...
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Cudzoziemiec

  • Waking up now, put the kettle on!
Re: Managing Junctions
« Reply #6 on: September 02, 2019, 01:32:46 pm »
Share-use pavements where you're continually giving way to traffic in that blind spot are best avoided...
But this is true of gnupwrites as well.
I do not ride a great big Mercian, gangster tanwalls, fixed cog in the back.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Managing Junctions
« Reply #7 on: September 02, 2019, 01:43:05 pm »
Share-use pavements where you're continually giving way to traffic in that blind spot are best avoided...
But this is true of gnupwrites as well.

Indeed.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

fd3

Re: Managing Junctions
« Reply #8 on: September 02, 2019, 02:15:20 pm »
If you don't drive, I can see how this would be a bit of a culture shock.
Yeah, I have found myself "taking a punt" on no car coming a couple times in the last couple days, which is also a couple times in my whole cycling life.
[/I could be wrong]

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Managing Junctions
« Reply #9 on: September 02, 2019, 02:42:00 pm »
Edging forward until you can see is generally better than just going for it, if only because what usually happens is the WTF-factor kicks in and a motorist stops to let you out.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Arellcat

  • Velonautte
Re: Managing Junctions
« Reply #10 on: September 02, 2019, 07:37:59 pm »
There's a mad junction on my way into town where the road joins the main road at about 30 degrees.  Van drivers not possessed of windows,
and/or necks made of rubber, must swing wildly to the right and then left, to force the proceedings into more of a T-junction.  Having failed to do this once while driving a Transit, I attempted to view approaching vehicles using the two square inches of blind spot mirror.  It was Extremely Difficult.

When I had my Speedmachine I used to do similar kinds of manoeuvres, because looking backwards over my shoulder was difficult1.  I did however have two rear view mirrors, which helped.  The rest of the time, such as at T-junctions when I had to emerge between vehicles, I tended to unclip, shuffle back on the seat and pull myself up on the handlebars—which as Kim noted are otherwise very in the way—and push forwards on one pedal as maneouvering demanded.

1 I have the same issue in my Quest, actually.  I shuffle back in the seat, sit more upright with my elbows sticking out of the shell, and that lets me twist to view traffic.

JennyB

  • Old enough to know better
Re: Managing Junctions
« Reply #11 on: September 03, 2019, 11:19:52 am »
Sounds like what is  needed is a mirror-onna-stick, or a trench periscope.
Or, on a really swish velomobile, a fisheye remote camera in the nose
Jennifer - walker of hills