Author Topic: Steel fork for front loader/rando  (Read 508 times)

Steel fork for front loader/rando
« on: October 06, 2019, 04:47:30 pm »
Hey up.
we are both in the process of speccing new build rando/endurance/touring bikes for the Spring. We are going with Bar bag and rack, front pannier set up. We had short listed a rodeo spork for the fork, but I have just been warned off it as a very stiff ride. We have parlee forks on our current bikes and had assumed, incorrectly it appears, that the spork would be a similar ride but with the ability to attach racks. Also aero bars on my bike for endurance races.
I know nothing about steel forks. Is there a good source to read up on the various properties?  The frames are ti, more relaxed geometry than our current bikes, sub compact gears, large tyre clearance, flat pedal affairs. Basically designed for going far in comfort and  able to carry load.
Bikes are to be built State side so it doesn't have to be a UK supplier.
Thanks.
All the gear and no idea.Three dimensionally dyslexic.

Re: Steel fork for front loader/rando
« Reply #1 on: October 06, 2019, 05:25:39 pm »
You could have lo-rider bosses welded onto Parlee forks of course.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Steel fork for front loader/rando
« Reply #2 on: October 06, 2019, 06:42:27 pm »
Surly make a variety of very comfortable steel forks with a number of different layouts of low rider etc bosses.
sideways bounding monkey lounging under fruit tree

Re: Steel fork for front loader/rando
« Reply #3 on: October 06, 2019, 07:23:05 pm »
I know nothing of either of the forks you mention, but I'm doubtful any fork, in any material, that's designed for disc brakes and front rack is going to have much give in it, though that's mitigated by larger tyres of course.
When I was searching for something similar a few years ago, Vicious Cycles in the US kept coming up with plenty of praise, in the end I went with something cheaper from IRD, though they seem to have dropped their steel range.  If the length/offset works for your new frame, the SOMA Wolverine fork might work, though it's no lightweight.

Re: Steel fork for front loader/rando
« Reply #4 on: October 06, 2019, 07:50:09 pm »
Touring bikes really need a matched fork as they have quite a range of slack head angles, and need enough offset to avoid slow steering and excessive lean steer (both great on a TT bike, nasty with luggage).  Road racing bikes all have 73 or 74 deg head angles and miminum length forks, so offset is always 43-45mm and forks are interchangeable.

Ask the frame supplier for recommended offset and axle-crown length.

Never tell me the odds.

Re: Steel fork for front loader/rando
« Reply #5 on: October 06, 2019, 11:20:02 pm »
yep, the usual head angle/ trail arrangements don't work so well once a bike has a big front load on.  You may prefer a low-trail setup. If you get the chance to try a few different setups (with a front load) you may be able to work out what you prefer.

cheers

Re: Steel fork for front loader/rando
« Reply #6 on: October 07, 2019, 09:16:14 pm »
A wise choice, which I hope you are pairing with front rim brakes. I have 531 steel forks on my custom  machines. The additional comfort due to the compliant fork is significant. You can see them flexing over bumps. By all means have a rear disc.

bludger

  • Randonneur and bargain hunter
Re: Steel fork for front loader/rando
« Reply #7 on: October 07, 2019, 09:27:43 pm »
Evans are trying to shift these £50 forks which come with luggage bosses, might fit you spec?

https://www.evanscycles.com/pinnacle-litihum-v-brake-fork-EV319410
YACF touring/audax bargain basement:
https://bit.ly/2Xg8pRD


Re: Steel fork for front loader/rando
« Reply #8 on: October 08, 2019, 04:23:36 pm »
Thanks.
TBH after reading up on all the diverging views of steel forks in loaded/unloaded situations I'm leaning towards risking it with the spork at least initially and seeing how I get on. If its in the same ball park as my current parlee I'll be happy enough. The builder has used Waterford straight steel forks on a bunch of other builds for customers so thats an option too. We are adamant about staying with disc (front and back) and I now know that building a low trail fork for discs is pretty specialist territory. There are builders out there like B Chapman, so thats another way to go I guess.
All the gear and no idea.Three dimensionally dyslexic.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Steel fork for front loader/rando
« Reply #9 on: October 08, 2019, 11:27:48 pm »
By all means have a rear disc.

Mismatched brakes on a touring bike?
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Re: Steel fork for front loader/rando
« Reply #10 on: October 11, 2019, 12:24:09 pm »
Try bearclaw bicycle companys Ti frame and fork .

Re: Steel fork for front loader/rando
« Reply #11 on: Yesterday at 04:52:47 pm »
Try bearclaw bicycle companys Ti frame and fork .

Thx.
All the gear and no idea.Three dimensionally dyslexic.