Author Topic: picking bits for a new bike  (Read 3716 times)

Re: picking bits for a new bike
« Reply #50 on: December 01, 2019, 09:41:40 pm »


I still think a fix in the back of beyond would be harder than with a cable.

Yes harder, but not super hard. About 15 mins to fit a new pre cut hose with fittings already on, and then add the small amount of mineral oil required.
If you don’t make time for exercise now, sooner or later you’ll need to make time for ill health.

Re: picking bits for a new bike
« Reply #51 on: December 01, 2019, 09:47:43 pm »
I try to not wade into the whole hydro 'debate' but a few years ago I was out MTBing with the dad on a hot day, and the rear brake seized up seemingly because of the heat. We tried to leak some fluid out but the rub persisted. Ended up taking the rotor off and stuffing an old train ticket between the blocks before carefully riding home on the roads if I remember rightly...

It wouldn't have been the ambient temperature as an increase of 20C would only lead to an expansion of the oil volume of about 0.7%. Something else must gave been going on.
Probably air in the system.

I've had exactly this problem with little miss hatler's MTB when left in the sun for half an hour.
Rust never sleeps

bludger

  • Randonneur and bargain hunter
Re: picking bits for a new bike
« Reply #52 on: December 01, 2019, 10:14:27 pm »
Yeah that was it. My dad takes shocking care of his bikes sadly. A big problem of owning >6 (!) of them is they are all in highly variable states of care.
YACF touring/audax bargain basement:
https://bit.ly/2Xg8pRD


Re: picking bits for a new bike
« Reply #53 on: March 07, 2020, 01:35:16 pm »
Well, this has dragged on  ::-)
I'm indecisive, then needed to get bits off other bikes to reuse here, then it took a while to sell various things to have the money, then a bike to work scheme order takes a bit longer then just clicking, and then Alpkit didn't have any axles. They still don't, but I've got them to send the rest to me anyway. Which makes a nice collection of boxes.  ;D



Thank you all for the advice.

Re: picking bits for a new bike
« Reply #54 on: March 07, 2020, 08:04:45 pm »
for want of a nail.....


Re: picking bits for a new bike
« Reply #55 on: March 07, 2020, 08:55:08 pm »
I’ll know a man with a hammer...

Re: picking bits for a new bike
« Reply #56 on: March 07, 2020, 09:01:59 pm »
The bolt through axles are due late March.
Today I made a start on the wheels, though only got one done due to loosing the bit that holds a tubeless value on.
I'm back to the LBS on Monday to get a headset fitted (Alpkit didn't have any that weren't committed to full bike builds) and then there's a few other bits I can get set up in evenings without the wheels being attached to the frame. Next weekend is busy, so the timing might work out.

Re: picking bits for a new bike
« Reply #57 on: March 25, 2020, 09:38:02 pm »
Readers of the fettling thread will know I've been doing this slowly, occupying a few evenings in and discovering the bits i don't have along the way. Tomorrow's jobs will be to tweak the handlebar position, tape the cables properly and wrap the bars. However, its starting to look more like a bike, and it both goes and stops :D
 

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Re: picking bits for a new bike
« Reply #58 on: March 26, 2020, 08:22:44 am »
For anyone losing sleep over the possibility of a STI lever failure while out in the wilderness, or even half way round any ride you want to complete - Carry a friction lever with a cable .......  It's easier to fit to a frame with bosses, otherwise you need a band on version and you may have to customise that if it's an OS tube, either way it probably takes less time to fit and adjust than it does to fix a puncture; only if you know what you're doing.

FTFY

Re: picking bits for a new bike
« Reply #59 on: March 26, 2020, 12:00:07 pm »
Drop bars and STIs?  I can count on less than one hand the number of times in the last 2 years I've used the drops.

My next bike will be specced with flat bars with bar-ends and a rohloff

there is more than one way to skin a cat for sure (hey I just typed 'fur sure'... should've left it really... ::-))  but the dropped part of drops don't have to be used much in order for dropped bars to be useful; all the other hand positions are useful and on the road those are the ones you need. Flat bars are OK but if you want to be comfortable and efficient on the road then drops are 'the way', even if you only use the dropped part of the bars when going downhill or something.

The main thing I don't like about dropped bars is that most people think that they must have STI shifters fitted to them, which I find objectionable/questionable on several counts.

cheers

Re: picking bits for a new bike
« Reply #60 on: March 27, 2020, 09:27:13 am »
Hmm,

and there's me about to order a bike that will built around a set of friction down tube shifters...

Re: picking bits for a new bike
« Reply #61 on: March 28, 2020, 06:28:17 pm »
My Camino and i had our first little ride today, to the park and back. It felt great - comfy, responsive.

There's a few things still to do...
Check the speed / cadence sensor is picking up.
The gears make a bit more noise than I'd like, so that needs a tweak.
The bolt for the front mudguards is too short, so a new one needs found.
My bell didn't fit.
Lights / mudguards needed.
I want to do a few rides before going anywhere near the steerer with a saw.
I've got a chip in the paint :( i guess that needs a touch up. Not sure when / how it happened.



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