Author Topic: Economics of getting rid of a car  (Read 4737 times)

Economics of getting rid of a car
« on: October 23, 2019, 02:36:48 pm »
OK, some ramblings of mine for whether or not I should keep my car. Prompted by the EV chat in another thread:-

Replacing an ICE vehicle with an EV is going to be of some benefit, replacing an ICE vehicle (or to a lesser extent an EV) with nothing is even better.

And in my own specific situation I can't see myself replacing my existing car with anything should it die. I only have the car because it was given to me as my mum chose to stop driving and when she looked into selling it she realised it would only go for £85 if she was lucky. All my siblings already own a car(s) so it was offered to me.

It costs ~£620 a year[1] before it even moves a single mile (although I recognise this is still quite cheap in terms of car ownership, some people pay close to that in VED alone). According to the online MOT history (https://www.check-mot.service.gov.uk/) I've averaged under 2000 miles a year for the last 3 years of ownership. I acknowledge that a significant chunk of those miles were frivolous and only because it was sitting outside ready and available. Public transport around us in London is fantastic and for longer journeys we tend to go by train anyway.

Despite being old (2001) the car is ULEZ compliant. Handy as I live half a mile outside the South Circular where the ULEZ will be extended soon. If it wasn't ULEZ compliant I'd be shot of it when that is extended.

Assuming 40mpg at £1.3/l that's about £300 on petrol giving me a total budget of £1000 a year if you throw in a few sundries like screenwash/etc and a contribution to a service every 3 years or so.

That £1000/year should go a long way.

The obvious replacement is Zipcar (there are 20 or so within a mile or so of where we live), and we have the added benefit of being grandfathered in to lifetime Zipcar membership with no annual fee as we were early/"founder" members of Streetcar. We would end up needing to pay £75/year (joint policy) in separate (non-Zipcar) Car Hire Excess Insurance though as we've been burned once by the car being damaged by someone else after our hire had finished but before the next person's hire began.

We do the majority of our shopping on foot (or me by bike) as we pick up things whenever we go past. The occasional big shops we do in the car (for heavy items like washing powder, bulk purchase of tins/booze, etc) can easily be replaced by ad hoc deliveries.

Ironically one of the biggest benefits to owning it is being the insurance covering me to drive other cars (albeit only 3rd party) but this isn't a regular occurrence and we can plan around it.

(2001 Citroen Saxo 1.1L Petrol. Insurance = £250, VED = £160, on-street parking = £160, MOT = £50. I doubt I could make this any cheaper. I could park it 400 yards away where there are no parking restrictions and save myself £160/year although I'd probably annoy the local residents there and insurance might go up as I'm not parking it outside my property. I could replace it with a much cheaper to tax car but buying a car for under £100 would be a gamble, I know this car has been well looked after.)
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Economics of getting rid of a car
« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2019, 04:36:24 pm »

As an exercise, work out how much that is costing you per hour of use, and per kilometre driven.

Many people use a car because it's there. If you have to think "it's gonna cost me €5 per hour to use this car to goto Ikea, maybe I'll take the train at about €3 each way".


But until we realise that public transport needs to be there to transport the public, rather than to make money, it's not going to change car ownership much.

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Re: Economics of getting rid of a car
« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2019, 04:43:33 pm »
But until we realise that public transport needs to be there to transport the public, rather than to make money, it's not going to change car ownership much.
Too true. Integrated public transport in Berlin was great when I was there (91 - 93). I assume there was much public subsidy to make it popular.

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Economics of getting rid of a car
« Reply #3 on: October 23, 2019, 04:45:43 pm »
But until we realise that public transport needs to be there to transport the public, rather than to make money, it's not going to change car ownership much.
Too true. Integrated public transport in Berlin was great when I was there (91 - 93). I assume there was much
public subsidy to make it popular.

Also economy of scale, but even then it doesn't really cover all options, doesn't necessarily run late enough, early enough, can require routes that go in and then out, etc... and if you want to get to $village, for 0800 on a Sunday, good luck!

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

FifeingEejit

  • Not Small
Re: Economics of getting rid of a car
« Reply #4 on: October 23, 2019, 04:55:43 pm »
Even when there's a good combination of public transport it can all go to pot through geography and timetables.

The biggest killer for me is I don't work in the town centre.
When I worked at the hospital the bus was about the same thanks to the distance you had to park away from the entrance, but then the bus company cancelled the buses that worked for me.

Here's the bus combination I'd need to use to get to my current workplace.
Traveline Scotland Journey Plan
From: Dundee International Sports Centre, Mains Loan, Dundee,  DD47AA
To: Wormit, Opp Post Office On Naughton Road
Departure time: 23/10/2019, 18:06
Arrival Time: 23/10/2019, 18:55
Details:
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Leg 1
Leave Dundee International Sports Centre, at 18:06 (Not actually my work but it appears in the planner, I get kicked out for the day at 1800)
Arrive Stobswell, near Morgan Academy on Forfar Road at 18:10
Mode: WALK

------------------------------------------------------------------------
Leg 2
Leave Stobswell, near Morgan Academy on Forfar Road at 18:10
Arrive Dundee City Centre, at Marks and Spencer on Seagate at 18:15
Mode: BUS
Operator: Stagecoach East Scotland

------------------------------------------------------------------------
Leg 3
Leave Dundee City Centre, at Marks and Spencer on Seagate at 18:15
Arrive Dundee City Centre, at Gellatly Street on Seagate at 18:15
Mode: WALK
This is basically changing bus stops, it's also the most polluted road in Dundee

------------------------------------------------------------------------
Leg 4
Leave Dundee City Centre, at Gellatly Street on Seagate at 18:30
Arrive Vomit at 18:46
Mode: BUS
Operator: Moffat + Williamson

------------------------------------------------------------------------
Leg 5
Leave Bus Shelter at 18:46
Arrive Hame 18:55
Mode: WALK
Walk directions:
   Walk 1km towards the hoose
Arrive around 10 minutes later


As we have integrated bus ticketing across all operators, that's 14.90 a week or 4.30 a day.


I can drive it under 20 mins
It's either 5.9 miles of town driving or 7.9 of a mix of town and country
a rather pathetic 30mpg...  = 0.26 of a gal which is erm 1.21l each way (the hill up will be discounted by the roll down) at £1.30 = £3.14 in fuel.

I budget 1500 a year to cover costs (VED, Insurance, MOT, repairs, consumables) so £4 a day.

So that's £7.25 a day to stay in bed an extra half hour a day and to go shopping at 2am when I feel like it.


I can cycle it in 30mins but it's a rubbish cycle up the hill and is bang on the border of "cycle in normal clothes" and "cycle in cycling kit".
I was hoping we'd move to a new office in the town centre (because there's lots of them being built) or back to the hospital but the for sale sign is still on the fence outside.

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Economics of getting rid of a car
« Reply #5 on: October 23, 2019, 05:08:45 pm »
Even when there's a good combination of public transport it can all go to pot.

<snip>

Arrive around 10 minutes later

I can drive it under 20 mins

How fast can you cycle it?

Recently GVB changed the timetables for all the public transport in Amsterdam that isn't run by NS. As a result it made all my journey's longer due to shit connections. It's meant I've done a lot more cycling than I used to in the city. Apart from going to the cinema (they don't like me taking the Brompton in), I pretty much just use the Brompton now if it's within Amsterdam.

They replaced what was a direct tram on one common journey I make, with either 2 metro's + 500m walk (faster, but 50% more expensive), or various combinations of 2-4 trams, which are cheaper, but take anything from 10-30 minutes longer. I can cycle it in the same time as the 2 metro/walk combo...

I actually got really annoyed with GVB about this, as they managed to somehow effect every single common journey I took by tram in the city, a single change can add upto 10 minutes to a 25 minute journey, and often a journey needs 2-4 changes, each of at least 5 minutes. But then it's ridiculously cheap compared to London, and at least it kinda works. Just annoyed they managed to embody Verschlimmbessern so well :(

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

FifeingEejit

  • Not Small
Re: Economics of getting rid of a car
« Reply #6 on: October 23, 2019, 05:12:54 pm »
did a bit of updating there, included cycling time.

Once into Dundee starting at river level in the lift of the bridge, (thanks to the OS kindly putting a spot height at the junction next to the office) just under 92m of climb in just over 1km, on a main road out of town.
I rode it I think once before deciding I'd need to extend the ride significantly to make it worthwhile, so I rode to St Andrews and back twice, and then gave up in favour of either staying in bed longer in the morning or getting out at night after work.


I suspect my normal usage pattern, (provided I continued to be able to gain access to other vehicles with decent range) would suit an Electric quite well but sadly not motorized abstinence.

Re: Economics of getting rid of a car
« Reply #7 on: October 23, 2019, 05:26:27 pm »
As an exercise, work out how much that is costing you per hour of use, and per kilometre driven.

Many people use a car because it's there. If you have to think "it's gonna cost me €5 per hour to use this car to goto Ikea, maybe I'll take the train at about €3 each way".

That doesn't really help me much as my car usage is atypical. I don't commute in it (I cycle/run or take public transport) and everywhere we go that we can go that public transport is possible/reasonable we generally already do.

It's the remaining journeys that I'm interested in, where public transport is impractical or impossible.

Anything other than the car tends to be more expensive in terms of tickets or time.

For example:-

I could drive 40 miles each way to see my brother and his family, if my car costs me £1000 a year for 2000 miles usage all in, then 80 miles has a realistic cost of £40. Via public transport it's £60 in train fares for the 3 of us (no advance fares available for this journey) and then we're still 5 miles from his house, a taxi would be another £10-£15 each way. A bus for the last section is sometimes possible but unreliable, plus it puts the entire journey up from 45 minutes to 2h30m. A compromise would be him driving to pick us up and drop us off to/from the local station, but that introduces a burden for him.

Luckily he has now moved to within walking distance a station and so that £60 in train fares represents better value, I'm happy to pay £20 extra not to have to drive even if I arrive a bit later and sweatier having had to walk the last 1.5 miles (including goading a grumpy 9yo into doing so).

Taking a local car load of stuff to the local tip is only a 4 mile round trip (£2 in car costs at the above rate) but the equivalent in a Zipcar would be at least £8 as you can't reliably do it in under an hour in case there's a big queue at the tip. Getting the stuff picked up by a rubbish/removals company would be way more than £8 and you run this risk of cowboys just fly-tipping it somewhere, plus at those prices its not worth the effort for them (and many don't even recycle but just shovel it into landfill). I could cycle it to the tip but it would be many many loads and would be free only if I ignore my time (I'd rather spend time with my family).

As I said I'm lucky that I'm in London and public transport is amazing. I don't even think about it if I need to get to anywhere else in London at any other time. Trains run from ~6am to midnight. The underground similarly (and some lines even have a 24h service). For really obscure times there's a reasonable night bus service.

Yet it still, just about, makes economic sense for me to continue to own a car that costs £620/year before it ever moves a mile.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Economics of getting rid of a car
« Reply #8 on: October 23, 2019, 05:40:38 pm »
That doesn't really help me much as my car usage is atypical. I don't commute in it (I cycle/run or take public transport) and everywhere we go that we can go that public transport is possible/reasonable we generally already do.

It's the remaining journeys that I'm interested in, where public transport is impractical or impossible.

Anything other than the car tends to be more expensive in terms of tickets or time.

For example:-

I could drive 40 miles each way to see my brother and his family, if my car costs me £1000 a year for 2000 miles usage all in, then 80 miles has a realistic cost of £40. Via public transport it's £60 in train fares for the 3 of us (no advance fares) and then we're still 5 miles from his house, a taxi would be another £10-£15 each way. A bus for the last section is sometimes possible but unreliable, plus it puts the entire journey up from 45 minutes to 2h30m. A compromise would be him driving to pick us up and drop us off to/from the local station, but that introduces a burden for him.

Luckily he has now moved to within walking distance a station and so that £60 in train fares represents better value, I'm happy to pay £20 extra not to have to drive even if I arrive a bit later and sweatier having had to walk the last 1.5 miles (including goading a grumpy 9yo into doing so).

Taking a local car load of stuff to the local tip is only a 4 mile round trip (£2 in car costs at the above rate) but the equivalent in a Zipcar would be at least £8 as you can't reliably do it in under an hour in case there's a big queue at the tip. Getting the stuff picked up by a rubbish/removals company would be way more than £8 and you run this risk of cowboys just fly-tipping it somewhere, plus at those prices its not worth the effort for them (and many don't even recycle but just shovel it into landfill). I could cycle it to the tip but it would be many many loads and would be free only if I ignore my time (I'd rather spend time with my family).

As I said I'm lucky that I'm in London and public transport is amazing. I don't even think about it if I need to get to anywhere else in London at any other time. Trains run from ~6am to midnight. The underground similarly (and some lines even have a 24h service). For really obscure times there's a reasonable night bus service.

Yet it still, just about, makes economic sense for me to continue to own a car that costs £620/year before it ever moves a mile.

I'd say you're more lucky that your vehicle running costs are so stupidly low. That's a really good deal that breaks all my usual maths examples...

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Re: Economics of getting rid of a car
« Reply #9 on: October 23, 2019, 05:58:08 pm »
It's a lifestyle choice, not everything has to be about money!
SORN the car for six months and see if you miss it.  On one else can answer that one for you.
I stopped owning a car in 1999, miss if far less than I thought I would, yet wouldn't rule out having another and I don't have many regrets for the time I ran one, life changes.

Writing this has made me realise I've now lived without a car for as long as with, that must be worth some sort of reward... wanders off to look at bikes...

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Economics of getting rid of a car
« Reply #10 on: October 23, 2019, 06:05:00 pm »

I've never owned a car. I've been fortunate enough to be put on other peoples insurance so I could drive their cars, but never owned one myself.

Read into that what you like.

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Economics of getting rid of a car
« Reply #11 on: October 23, 2019, 06:10:43 pm »
We don't have a car.
David can't drive & I won't drive as I don't feel safe.
London's transport is brilliant, as you say.
We get Sainsbury's deliveries (Anytime Pass is £60 for a year) and cabs as needed.
I think we're quids in.

Dad Did The Sums when he wrote off his car a few years ago and Mum felt he was unsafe to keep driving. He reckoned he'd save a lot not driving.

Re: Economics of getting rid of a car
« Reply #12 on: October 23, 2019, 06:12:17 pm »
SORN the car for six months and see if you miss it.

That's not really the point of this thread (I'm not really sure what the point of this thread is actually).

I can't SORN it as I don't have anywhere to store it off the road, so I'd have to pay for that. Seems counter-productive. I may also lose no-claims continuity and so reinsuring it if I got it back on the road might end up costing me more.

There's little point in the experiment anyway as I know I can happily live without it.

I guess my point was that I've got my car usage down to the point where it's no real difference between owning it (and paying for all of those costs) or not owning it and paying a roughly equivalent amount of money to Zipcar (and a bit to taxis/Uber). Given this, what is the pressing need to get rid of it?

(It's not a burden on parking around here, despite being in SW London I'd say the parking bays around me are rarely ever above 20% occupancy. I don't live somewhere where you end up having to drive around for 10 minutes to find somewhere to park ending up 3 roads away.)

This is the first ever car that I've owned[1] and I only own it because it was being given to me, although I could easily have said no (or got rid of it since). Only ever owned motorbikes before this.

1. Well, technically not, when my brother had two cars he put one in my name so I could get a parking permit for it.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Economics of getting rid of a car
« Reply #13 on: October 23, 2019, 06:13:54 pm »
I owned a car for a bit, which I think was a valuable learning-to-drive experience.  Didn't really use it enough.  Then I re-discovered bicycles.

I've occasionally borrowed or hired cars and vans for the uncommon journeys[1].  Currently a member of Co-Wheels car club, which allows me to have use of cars that are better quality (reliability, comfort, lower emissions) than anything I'd willingly spend money on, and don't get vandalised[2] by the revelling BloodyStudents when parked outside our house doing nothing.

My main annoyance is that they've expanded the Birmingham fleet, to the effect that the useful larger vehicles have migrated into the city centre, to be replaced with assorted Yarises (which are okay, but small) and Aygos (which is a car for people who need a coat and a bicycle).  And that the Nissan Leaf went back to the lease company to be replaced by multiple mild hybrids, on pragmatic economic grounds.

AIUI, barakta is eligible for motability.  We're hoping it won't come to that, as she can't drive herself.


[1] Mostly camping trips, HPV races, missions requiring tools and materials, and driving people to/from hospitals.
[2] Or, more accurately, when they do get vandalised, I don't have to deal with it.

Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Economics of getting rid of a car
« Reply #14 on: October 23, 2019, 06:16:04 pm »
Given this, what is the pressing need to get rid of it?
There isn't one, you've asked and answered your own question.

Re: Economics of getting rid of a car
« Reply #15 on: October 23, 2019, 06:37:38 pm »
It's a lifestyle choice, not everything has to be about money!
SORN the car for six months and see if you miss it.  On one else can answer that one for you.
I stopped owning a car in 1999, miss if far less than I thought I would, yet wouldn't rule out having another and I don't have many regrets for the time I ran one, life changes.

Writing this has made me realise I've now lived without a car for as long as with, that must be worth some sort of reward... wanders off to look at bikes...
I've been car-less since 1992 and the motorbike went around 5 years ago.
As Helly and others have implied London, where I live, has an excellent public transport service.
Can I ask whereabouts you live, Paul H?

Re: Economics of getting rid of a car
« Reply #16 on: October 23, 2019, 11:00:45 pm »
Can I ask whereabouts you live, Paul H?
Derby - a couple of miles from the centre, well served by buses including one that runs 24hr though they're all expensive, on the right side of town for the railway station, on the bike path, and within walking distance of a co-wheels car.  Until it collapsed a few months ago, also within walking distance of an elec bike hire docking station.
It is an easy place to be car free, but that isn't entirely a coincidence, it was one of the things considered before deciding to live here.

fd3

Re: Economics of getting rid of a car
« Reply #17 on: October 23, 2019, 11:46:00 pm »
I could drive 40 miles each way to see my brother and his family, if my car costs me £1000 a year for 2000 miles usage all in, then 80 miles has a realistic cost of £40. Via public transport it's £60 in train fares for the 3 of us
So, how much would it cost to hire a car for the day?  If you were part of a car-hire club would those costs be lass annually than your car?
[/I could be wrong]

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Economics of getting rid of a car
« Reply #18 on: October 23, 2019, 11:56:04 pm »
I could drive 40 miles each way to see my brother and his family, if my car costs me £1000 a year for 2000 miles usage all in, then 80 miles has a realistic cost of £40. Via public transport it's £60 in train fares for the 3 of us
So, how much would it cost to hire a car for the day?  If you were part of a car-hire club would those costs be lass annually than your car?

Assuming for simplicity, £1 == €1, I pay €49 for a days use of a car, and then about €0.15 per km, or I can pay €6.95 per hour, and the same per km. (I could pay slightly less on each, but then I'd pay a monthly membership, rather than free, and then it would need use it more to make it worth while).

So assuming 100km in a day, that's €64 per day. Need it for less than 15 days, and greenwheels is cheaper.

If you aren't lucky enough to have such a low TCOO as greenbank, then it would be even more cost effective.

Most hire companies offer a good weekend rate, if you need a car for one weekend a month, and your car more than €1200 a year, it's probably more cost effective to hire one...

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Re: Economics of getting rid of a car
« Reply #19 on: October 24, 2019, 10:02:56 am »
I could drive 40 miles each way to see my brother and his family, if my car costs me £1000 a year for 2000 miles usage all in, then 80 miles has a realistic cost of £40. Via public transport it's £60 in train fares for the 3 of us
So, how much would it cost to hire a car for the day?  If you were part of a car-hire club would those costs be lass annually than your car?

£70/day for the cheapest Zipcar which includes 60 miles free/day. Additional miles are 25p. So that would be £75.

Renting a car from someone like Budget is ~£50/day even for their smallest car and doesn't include petrol (which would probably be around £8). It's a lot more faff (in time and effort) than Zipcar though. Zipcar I can book one and be driving it within minutes, returning it is just a case of parking up and getting out. I also only have to walk a few hundred meters to get to/from it. Renting a car means a 10 minute walk either end and then the endless "tappity tap, tappity tap, pause, tappity tap" paperwork faff at the office, returning it is often more work to avoid them claiming there was damage.

If I want to rent a car and return it on a Sunday I also have to factor in 30 minutes travel each way (including a 10 minute train journey) as my local rental car office doesn't open on a Sunday.

As I said above, dumping the car and using Zipcar/uber/taxi only when necessary would probably cost about the same annually.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Re: Economics of getting rid of a car
« Reply #20 on: October 24, 2019, 10:38:44 am »
I don't run a car, partly out of conviction, but mainly because - though I've had a license for two decades now - I've never owned one, so the insurance would be a killer for the first couple of years. I've always assumed the cost of running a car would be a couple of grand a year, which buys a lot of taxis (my OH has a chronic condition, so on bad days will take a minicab into work and back - cost under a tenner). AFAIK there aren't any car club vehicles anywhere nearby, but the local Enterprise car rental is 15 minutes walk away, and their day rates are between about £20 and £50, so I tend to use them when I need a vehicle for holidays etc. I suspect I spend about a grand a year on car rentals and petrol, though for short local stuff (a run to the tip or whatever where I can't use the cargo bike) I can usually borrow my dad's car.

If I could run a car for a grand a year I'd probably do it, mainly because the marginal cost of journeys is then basically petrol; there's enough places round here for days out with my kids that are about 25 minutes by car, but up to 2 hours on public transport. At present that just means we only go when we've got a car for a couple of days for other reasons.

ian

  • feat. Undead Jess & Finestre, Queen of Hell
Re: Economics of getting rid of a car
« Reply #21 on: October 24, 2019, 11:00:22 am »
I've yet to get around to learning to drive in the UK and I don't think I will (in part, because if I can, I probably will). We like having a car just because. Money isn't an issue and it's a cheap model in its twelfth year. Beyond occasional convenience, losing it would have no impact on my life, as I generally walk, cycle or take the bus and train. Of course, these are possible is a purposeful choice on our part. We did contemplate moving further afield but also that we'd then be reliant on driving to do practically anything. These are the choices we make, and of course, by encouraging car-dependence at every turn, it's become a lot harder to make those choices. Wander by any of those scabrous new edge-of-town housing developments, you'll note one thing, cars. There might be a nod to occasional bus service, or a train station 20 minutes away, or a half-hearted painted bicycle on the pavement, but really, it's car or car.
Support the Great Surrey Bear Census 2020

Re: Economics of getting rid of a car
« Reply #22 on: October 24, 2019, 11:25:05 am »
The costs of having a car from Co-wheels
Elec Renault Zoe is £5.50 an hr or £38.50 a day, no mileage fee as long as you recharge at their specified charging points.
Yaris Hybrid is the same rate plus 18p a mile
There are other cars, but I haven't used them yet, there's also an overnight option (8-8) for 30% of the day rate and the day rate covers any 24hr period, so if you time it right you can have the car 36hr for £50.
Other costs  - £25 joining fee, £5 a month minimum spend, if you want to protect yourself from the high excess you're better off with a third party insurance, I pay £28 a year which covers any hire.
I've only been a member a couple of months and used it three times, I like the hourly option and the set mileage fee, though for the rare trips longer than a couple of days I still think the local car hire company will do me a better deal.

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Economics of getting rid of a car
« Reply #23 on: October 24, 2019, 11:35:23 am »

For those of you who own cars, what are the economics of your car ownership?

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Re: Economics of getting rid of a car
« Reply #24 on: October 24, 2019, 11:53:45 am »

For those of you who own cars, what are the economics of your car ownership?

J
Previously, it went like this:

Purchase: approx £1000
Insurance: £200
Repairs(incl MoT):£400 (usually much lower, but some years included tyres, so I'm rounding up)
VED: £155
Fuel: £2000


Replacement car
Purchase: approx £8500
Insurance: not sure
Repairs(incl MoT):£0
VED: £30
Fuel: £1400
<i>Marmite slave</i>