Author Topic: Moulton TSR22 v TSR30  (Read 1325 times)

Moulton TSR22 v TSR30
« on: November 02, 2019, 09:41:03 am »
I’m not sure why, but I keep pondering getting a Moulton. I am absolutely NOT having a mid life crisis, the fact I’m nearly 40 is irrelevant. Ahem. I’m thinking it would be good for travelling (possibly combined with a trailer/ suitcase, but still capable of proper touring/ randonneuring. Plus, it does look rather fun!

The obvious differences are of course gears, the TSR22 has V brakes rather than callipers and the 22 is lighter (not totally sure where the weight saving comes from, apart from the gearing). Are there any other differences?

I know the TSR30s have some issues around the pivot on the rear suspension. Does anyone know if this has been sorted on the TSR22?

There are a few secondhand TSR30s popping up in various places, for around half the price of a new TSR22. Anyone got any thoughts??


Re: Moulton TSR22 v TSR30
« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2019, 09:47:35 am »
All TSRs have a smaller-than ideal, and offset, rear pivot.  The SST fixes this issue.

The TSR pivot is not a problem if looked after, but you will need a proper high pressure grease gun to keep it purged.  The bushes and spindle are home replaceable (unlike Brompton) but you can wear the frame lugs if you let it go too far.

Mine's a TSR fixie at the moment - I bought it as a TSR18 and ran it as a TSR9 for a year.  It's just a frame with different parts hung off it.
And Darkness and Decay and the Coronavirus held illimitable dominion over all.

DaT

Re: Moulton TSR22 v TSR30
« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2019, 10:37:32 am »
All TSRs have a smaller-than ideal, and offset, rear pivot.  The SST fixes this issue.

The TSR pivot is not a problem if looked after, but you will need a proper high pressure grease gun to keep it purged.  The bushes and spindle are home replaceable (unlike Brompton) but you can wear the frame lugs if you let it go too far.

Mine's a TSR fixie at the moment - I bought it as a TSR18 and ran it as a TSR9 for a year.  It's just a frame with different parts hung off it.
Not always, the tsr2 is 120mm without hangers and a split stay.

Re: Moulton TSR22 v TSR30
« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2019, 11:45:29 am »
Is that the belt drive one with a kickback hub?

FWIW, a Moulton is a bit harder going than a 700c bike.  I'd say 1mph slower for the same effort.  A lack of really fast 20" tyres is a major factor.  The suspension is useful on bad roads.  There is a lot of bob if you pedal standing up.
And Darkness and Decay and the Coronavirus held illimitable dominion over all.

Re: Moulton TSR22 v TSR30
« Reply #4 on: November 02, 2019, 12:07:29 pm »
FWIW, a Moulton is a bit harder going than a 700c bike.  I'd say 1mph slower for the same effort.  A lack of really fast 20" tyres is a major factor.  The suspension is useful on bad roads.  There is a lot of bob if you pedal standing up.

That’s fine, I did PBP on a tricycle, which is probably 2-3 mph slower. I seem to be developing a thing for differently normal machines...

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Moulton TSR22 v TSR30
« Reply #5 on: November 02, 2019, 03:51:42 pm »
A lack of really fast 20" tyres is a major factor.

There's now a 406 Pro One that's pretty good.  But you'd have to put it on a rim...
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

DaT

Re: Moulton TSR22 v TSR30
« Reply #6 on: November 02, 2019, 04:05:50 pm »
Is that the belt drive one with a kickback hub?

FWIW, a Moulton is a bit harder going than a 700c bike.  I'd say 1mph slower for the same effort.  A lack of really fast 20" tyres is a major factor.  The suspension is useful on bad roads.  There is a lot of bob if you pedal standing up.
Yeah, the orange one.

I found my AM-18 much faster than my tsr30. The TSR is a touring bike so expect what comes with it. I'd love to try an AM-Speed or double pylon one day.

Re: Moulton TSR22 v TSR30
« Reply #7 on: December 22, 2019, 10:44:34 pm »
A lack of really fast 20" tyres is a major factor.

There's now a 406 Pro One that's pretty good.  But you'd have to put it on a rim...

Tell me about it. Having tried just about everything I'm now back to the Duranos, although the newer folding ones don't seem so wooden.

The only way into Moulton ownership for me was a second hand TSR 30. Anyway, I find it fun to ride which should be the true measure of any bike. I suspect it is slower than a 700c but as said upthread due to wheels/tyres rather than suspension. And I got to buy a very cool Wanner grease gun to keep the pivot happy.