Author Topic: Home Internet  (Read 1815 times)

velosam

  • '.....you used to be an apple on a stick.'
Home Internet
« on: November 15, 2019, 04:45:06 pm »
I currently don't have home internet and simply use the hotspot on my phone. It just about suffices for work but its a little slow.

I don't really want to have cable installed as they put holes in the wall etc.

Is there anyway I can wireless connectivity to my home without it costing a bomb, or I am just better off getting the cable put in and a home hub.

The connection will be used for netflix and downloading stuff. Note the former will only happen if it can be done from a hub as opposed to needing a connection. I also will not be getting a tv licence

simonp

  • Omnomnomnipotent.
Re: Home Internet
« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2019, 04:50:48 pm »
Don't you have an existing phone line to the property?

fuaran

  • rothair gasta
Re: Home Internet
« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2019, 05:13:03 pm »
You could get a 4G/5G router. That just connects to the mobile network, then you connect your devices to the router with wifi or ethernet.
Speed will depend on how good your phone signal is. You could connect an external antenna to the router, which could help. eg if you put the antenna on your roof, or at the window pointing towards the nearest mast.

Cost will depend on the network, and how much data you need. Some networks offer 'unlimited' data, but will slow it down if you use too much.
Cheapest is probably Three, but rubbish coverage.

velosam

  • '.....you used to be an apple on a stick.'
Re: Home Internet
« Reply #3 on: November 15, 2019, 06:18:29 pm »
I plugged all the holes in the wall.  I am on 3 now but in this house it really is rubbish!!

May just have to get cable sigh

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: Home Internet
« Reply #4 on: November 15, 2019, 06:20:19 pm »
Vote Labour and wait 10 years  ;)
If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.

Re: Home Internet
« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2019, 06:26:33 pm »
Vote Labour and wait 10 years  ;)

Vote tory and, well, just wait ...

CommuteTooFar

  • Inadequate Randonneur
Re: Home Internet
« Reply #6 on: November 16, 2019, 02:15:57 pm »
The connection will be used for netflix and downloading stuff. Note the former will only happen if it can be done from a hub as opposed to needing a connection. I also will not be getting a tv licence

Bad news about the TV Licence. If use any broadcast, catch-up service,  streaming service, etc. including Sky, BT Sport, Netflix and Prime You should have a TV licence for you home. The device and source are irrelevant if watch moving pictures in a british home you need a TV Licence.  Watching BBC is not the only reason the TV Licence is imposed. Governments like taxes.

There are grey areas.  Does a coffee shop need a licence if a customer walks in and watchs a bit of youtube while they drink their latte.


 

Re: Home Internet
« Reply #7 on: November 16, 2019, 02:34:04 pm »
You only need a TV Licence for watching or recording "live broadcast TV" and BBC streamed on-demand TV (Iplayer).




Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Home Internet
« Reply #8 on: November 16, 2019, 02:47:41 pm »
There are grey areas.  Does a coffee shop need a licence if a customer walks in and watchs a bit of youtube while they drink their latte.

You don't need a licence to watch Youtube, unless it's a live stream of a *broadcast* TV channel.  (Eg. the NASA TV stream, which is broadcast by satellite in USAnia.)

I'm not sure of the legal status of an internet stream that gets picked up live by a broadcaster.  But I expect neither is anyone else.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Home Internet
« Reply #9 on: November 16, 2019, 02:51:26 pm »
You only need a TV Licence for watching or recording "live broadcast TV" and BBC streamed on-demand TV (Iplayer).

And ITV player, and All 4, and Virgin Media, and etc. etc.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

Re: Home Internet
« Reply #10 on: November 16, 2019, 02:52:49 pm »
Don't you have an existing phone line to the property?

I see Sam didn’t reply to this, but assuming he does,  that would be my choice, especially as he’s likely to be able to get FTTC.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

CommuteTooFar

  • Inadequate Randonneur
Re: Home Internet
« Reply #11 on: November 16, 2019, 02:55:42 pm »
Yes, I was wrong. Sorry.  Netflix and Prime do not require tv licence. (unless watching a bbc programme, maybe tricky not to)

Re: Home Internet
« Reply #12 on: November 16, 2019, 03:07:21 pm »
You only need a TV Licence for watching or recording "live broadcast TV" and BBC streamed on-demand TV (Iplayer).

And ITV player, and All 4, and Virgin Media, and etc. etc.

You don't need a licence for non-BBC catchup streaming including:
Quote
All 4, Sky Go, Virgin Media, Now TV, BT TV, Apple TV, YouTube, Amazon Prime Video and ITV Hub
.

https://www.tvlicensing.co.uk/check-if-you-need-one

Quote
You need to be covered by a TV Licence to

    watch or record programmes as they’re being shown on TV or live on an online TV service
    download or watch BBC programmes on iPlayer.
https://www.tvlicensing.co.uk/check-if-you-need-one/topics/watching-online-and-on-mobile-devices-TOP14

Quote
Do I need a TV Licence if I only ever watch on demand or catch up TV online?

    It depends what you watch.

    You don’t need a licence if you only ever watch on demand or catch up programmes on services other than BBC iPlayer (and you also never watch live TV programmes on any channel, including on iPlayer). You also don’t need a licence if you only ever watch S4C TV on demand or listen to radio on iPlayer.

velosam

  • '.....you used to be an apple on a stick.'
Re: Home Internet
« Reply #13 on: November 16, 2019, 03:36:50 pm »
Sorry just catching up

There used be a phone line but I had it all ripped out when they decorated- still some sockets in certain rooms.

I really just want decent net access so that my son can watch Netflix when he is over

MikeFromLFE

  • Previously known as Millimole
Re: Home Internet
« Reply #14 on: November 16, 2019, 07:12:15 pm »
The fibre option only needs a single master socket for the phone line. If you've had it disconnected then Openreach will charge you (a fortune probably) to reconnect.
The cost of a 3g/4g router will not be trivial.
You might find that a new cable installation (Virgin usually) is the cheapest upfront cost, and might use your (? existing) phone master socket.

As regards ongoing costs - for irregular heavy (streaming)  use (when your son comes round) the 3g/4g router might be the most cost-effective of all of these.
But there are some occasional very good fibre deals around, but you tend to have sign up for 18 months.

The fastest speeds (needed for streaming) are with cable, although fibre is generally more than good enough depending on where you are in relation to the street box & exchange. I'd guess that the 3g/4g will give the flakiest service, depending on distance to mast and the number of users of it.

Swings and roundabouts, only you can balance up the sums and practicalities.

Sent from my Moto E (4) Plus using Tapatalk

Too many angry people - breathe & relax.

velosam

  • '.....you used to be an apple on a stick.'
Re: Home Internet
« Reply #15 on: November 16, 2019, 09:34:31 pm »
I am sure there are phone sockets but I have no idea where the master is.  I was thinking cable and I know the neighbour has cable - it runs on our shared fence

fuaran

  • rothair gasta
Re: Home Internet
« Reply #16 on: November 16, 2019, 10:28:25 pm »
The cost of a 3g/4g router will not be trivial.
Some networks will give you one for free, if you sign up for 18 month contract. Or you can buy one for £70 or so, and put in whatever SIM you like. eg https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B016ZWXYXG/
Though more expensive if you need to upgrade the antennas etc.

Virgin may have some good deals, though they will probably try to sell you a bundle with a phoneline and dozens of TV channels. Seems it could be cheaper to sign up for a bundle, even if you never use the phoneline/TV.

Re: Home Internet
« Reply #17 on: November 16, 2019, 11:42:13 pm »
The previous owner of my flat didn't have a phone and a new master socket and cabling up the stairs was installed at no cost to me when I signed up to Sky Broadband. Might be different if you have a real house, of course.

I don't think you need fibre or anything fancy for Netflix. Bog standard ADSL should be fine.

Cable means Virgin, who are terrible terrible company for customer service and to get out of a contract with. At least with ADSL you get to choose your enemy.

MikeFromLFE

  • Previously known as Millimole
Re: Home Internet
« Reply #18 on: November 17, 2019, 08:40:56 am »


Cable means Virgin, who are terrible terrible company for customer service and to get out of a contract with. At least with ADSL you get to choose your enemy.

Apart from my tech-savvy neighbour I don't know anyone personally who has had a good experience with Virgin Cable.
I refuse to deal with them -quite irrationally - based on my experience with their predecessors NTL who threatened me with balliffs for a bill when I wasn't using their service.

Sent from my Moto E (4) Plus using Tapatalk

Too many angry people - breathe & relax.

Re: Home Internet
« Reply #19 on: November 17, 2019, 10:03:58 am »
Was a satisfied customer of Virgin for many years, but since sold to an American company they keep jacking the price up and reducing customer service. The last straw this year was losing access to my email for nearly four weeks. Every day I called them to be told it would be fixed the next day, it never was. Also the call centre is now outsourced to India; I can cope with an Indian accent, or a poor quality line, but not both together.

As soon as the expected price rise letter arrived, I took the option to terminate the contract without penalty.

Now with Zen, so far so good...

DaveJ

  • Happy days
Re: Home Internet
« Reply #20 on: November 17, 2019, 01:38:21 pm »
We have had Virgin here for getting on 4 years now, moving away from BT because of intermittent pauses with their Infinity 2 product. So far its good: fast and reliable.

Broadband seems to be something of a lottery, and by the time you find out that the one you signed up for doesn't work for you, its too late....

The Facebook group for our road is interesting on this subject.  For every ISP, there's someone who has had a bad experience with them, and there's someone else who'll tell you it works perfectly.  And thats probably using just two cabinets for each provider, so not like there's really any major difference in how the service is provided.

Customer service from Plusnet and Talktalk is poor (Plusnet long waits, Talk Talk just useless).  Customer Service from Sky is variable, I had to wait 25 minutes one day last week to get through to them, but to be fair to them, when I got disconnected, the Customer Service person did call me back, and they did sent out the required new router).  I've not had need to call Virgin Customer Service.  BT can be dreadful, getting passed from one team to another and none of them call you back.

Mr Larrington

  • A bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
  • Custard Wallah
    • Mr Larrington's Automatic Diary
Re: Home Internet
« Reply #21 on: November 17, 2019, 01:53:11 pm »
There are grey areas.  Does a coffee shop need a licence if a customer walks in and watchs a bit of youtube while they drink their latte.

That sort of situation – watching a licence-requiring source on a phone, slab or laptop – might be covered by the rules about portable TVs, assuming said rules still exist.  Your home licence covered a portable distascope in a caravan or boat.

Apropos the OP, I've been with Freeola – part of Entanet – for many years for regular ADSL and their tech support has proven æxcellent.  Although they reckon my current slow speed and occasional dropouts may be due to the antediluvian sockets installed in Larrington Towers which, were it proven to be the case, would cost the thick end of £200 to GAMI.  This1 has put me off upgrading to fibre from both my current mob and The Usual Suspects even though Murdoch and Branson don't own $ky and Virgin any more.

The lovely boys and girls at Andrews & Arnold offer various options with their Home::1 service, including one where they install a "phone" line.  I opted for FTTP, techo-weenie that I be.

1: Well, that and the tempting prices that suddenly jack themselves right up after a year or two.
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Home Internet
« Reply #22 on: November 17, 2019, 03:12:56 pm »
The lovely boys and girls at Andrews & Arnold[1] seem to be an effective way of stacking the odds of the lottery in your favour.  They can't solve the inherent poor performance of long lines, but they can diagnose and harass our-favourite-telco into fixing most actual faults.  Of course, you pay for what you get...


[1] Only one of them's called Andrew[2] and none of them are in Arnold, Nottingham - whatever the GeoIP databases might insinuate.
[2] And I'm suspicious that he may be a bot, on account of his uncanny habit of popping up and fixing things for people outside office hours.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Home Internet
« Reply #23 on: November 18, 2019, 09:21:56 am »
I have Three's mobile broadband and it's OK. I get c.20Mbps up and downstream on 4G. It's £17/month on a 2-year deal. No cables required other than a mains lead.
Haggerty F, Haggerty R, Tomkins, Noble, Carrick, Robson, Crapper, Dewhurst, Macintyre, Treadmore, Davitt.

velosam

  • '.....you used to be an apple on a stick.'
Re: Home Internet
« Reply #24 on: November 18, 2019, 10:18:11 am »
I currently have 3 on my phone but the coverage is awful in the house (I use my phone as a personal hotspot). 

I think I will probably go ADSL and see what the costs are.

Thanks all