Author Topic: Kit for different temperatures  (Read 1015 times)

telstarbox

  • Loving the lanes
Kit for different temperatures
« on: November 25, 2019, 12:34:30 pm »
It was unseasonably mild in Kent this weekend which got me thinking about what clothing works for different temperature. I think my approximate ranges are:

13C and above - short sleeve jersey + base layer, shorts, socks, shoes
8-12C - long jersey + short base layer, shorts, socks, shoes
4-7C - long jersey + long base layer, leggings + overshorts, socks, shoes
3C and below - long jersey + long base layer, leggings + overshorts, double socks, shoes
Plus full gloves for all temperatures.

These would be for a ride of 2-3 hours. For a commute I'd tolerate a bit of cold and for something longer I'd err on the side of being overdressed, likewise if the forecast included significant wind. 

What works for you?
2019 🏅 R1000 and B1000

Re: Kit for different temperatures
« Reply #1 on: November 25, 2019, 12:46:34 pm »
I rarely remember the temperature so not sure about those. Damp is the other thing I'd consider.
On the top the progression is probably short sleeve, long sleeve, long sleeve with long base layer. Though there's  lighter and heavier of both top and base.
On the bottom shorts, shorts and bikesters, warm longs. With cooler or warmer socks and neoprene overshoes.
Also hats and gloves to suit.

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Re: Kit for different temperatures
« Reply #2 on: November 25, 2019, 12:53:26 pm »
I always carry a windproof/showerproof. Temperatures vary from start to end of a day a lot, so can the weather.
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Re: Kit for different temperatures
« Reply #3 on: November 27, 2019, 01:11:58 pm »
I hate leggings because they mess up my knee tracking, so I wear shorts whatever the weather. You didn't include a warmer temperature setting without the base layer - I definitely have such a setting.
As for gloves, I only wear full fingers when it's wintery, otherwise it's mitts.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Kit for different temperatures
« Reply #4 on: November 27, 2019, 01:28:50 pm »
What works for you?

For sustained riding:

>15C: 3/4s, jersey, mitts, sandals or highly ventilated road shoes.
12-15C: 3/4s, base layer, jersey, mitts.  Sandals or normal MTB shoes with thin socks.
8-12C: 3/4s (or tights over 3/4s), base layer, jersey + arm warmers (or winter jersey), thin gloves, Sandals or MTB shoes with thicker socks.  Optional windproof gilet for extra warmth.
5-8C: Tights over 3/4s, base layer, winter jersey, thick gloves, wool cycling cap, cycling shoes or boots with two pairs of socks.
<5C: As above, but extra base layers, buffs, glove liners, etc.  Waterproof jacket for warmth rather than keeping water out.

(Add a little extra clothing for conditions below 12C where I don't have the insulation of a recumbent seat.)

If I'm just doing short utility rides, I'll cut down on the layers and wear the waterproof jacket instead, and be a bit less fussy about foot insulation (generally winter boots in my standard cotton socks).  I'll be at my destination before I'm soaked with sweat and my feet have frozen.

If I'm not already wearing them, I usually carry Rainlegs, gilet, arm warmers, +1 level of gloves and a buff on any non-utility ride, and usually a waterproof jacket unless it's unambiguously too hot for such things.

I sweat according to effort, not temperature, which means I get cold when I stop, and am really bad at judging the temperature before I've been riding for a while.  I find the thermometer on my cycle computer useful for knowing what layers to add (or more likely, remove) before I get back on the bike - especially on overnight rides where there's a wide range of temperatures.

The 8-12C band is very context-dependent.  I'll wear a lot less when the temperature drops below 12 on a summer night ride than I'd want for going out in today's November 9C drizzle.

If it's warm enough, my general approach to rain for sustained riding is to wear as little as possible, on the basis that it will dry out more quickly.

I see no real disadvantage to 3/4s in hot weather, and the extra knee insulation makes a difference in medium conditions, so I don't bother with owning shorts.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Kit for different temperatures
« Reply #5 on: November 27, 2019, 01:31:03 pm »
I just go for layers:-

Standard: Shorts, short sleeve jersey, mitts, cap

Bit colder and a buff may be added so I can cover my mouth on the initial descent down the hill before I've warmed up
Next to be added are knee warmers and possibly arm warmers
After that is a windproof gilet
Gilet replaced with waterproof jacket (and arm warmers removed) if cold or wet. More than one choice of jacket so I've got something light for warm rain showers and something heavier for proper cold

To keep the hands warm stage 2 is a pair of cotton inner gloves worn over the mitts (my long finger cycling gloves ended up falling apart otherwise I'd use them). Far from waterproof but I aim for "warm and wet" rather than pretending I can stay dry.
Stage 3 for hands is a pair of Altura waterproof gloves. These have been good enough for prolonged rides in snowy weather.

Knee warmers become full leg warmers if it's likely to be really cold (e.g. sub zero temps). Also I can add a base layer under the jersey.

I think I last wore a long sleeve jersey about 5 years ago. I don't like them as I can't do anything about the long sleeves if I start to get too hot. That's why I prefer short sleeve jersey and separate arm warmers.

I'll admit it is a bit of a faff to put on lots of different layers in the colder weather, but it only takes an extra minute or so.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Re: Kit for different temperatures
« Reply #6 on: November 27, 2019, 01:32:35 pm »
I hate leggings because they mess up my knee tracking, so I wear shorts whatever the weather. You didn't include a warmer temperature setting without the base layer - I definitely have such a setting.
As for gloves, I only wear full fingers when it's wintery, otherwise it's mitts.
You wear shorts in sub-zero weather? Hard man!
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Kit for different temperatures
« Reply #7 on: November 27, 2019, 01:38:00 pm »
I think I last wore a long sleeve jersey about 5 years ago. I don't like them as I can't do anything about the long sleeves if I start to get too hot. That's why I prefer short sleeve jersey and separate arm warmers.

If it's properly cold, I know I won't be taking the winter jersey off, so that's fine.  But long sleeve thin jerseys are of limited use for exactly this reason.  I own a couple, and they mostly get worn for trips to the shops.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: Kit for different temperatures
« Reply #8 on: November 27, 2019, 02:01:06 pm »
Hot to cold:
Bib knicks, summerweight jersey (short or long sleeve depending on how much I don't want to wear sunscreen), track mitts, cotton cap
Armwarmers, glove liners
Legwarmers
Merino T-shirt
Winterweight jersey (short or long sleeve depending on whether temperatures will change a lot)
Bib tights
Winter gloves, wool hat
Gilet, windproof or rain jacket, buff
Toecovers or booties (snow or lots of cold rain)

Socks are always slightly thick wool, regardless of temperature.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

Cudzoziemiec

  • Waking up now, put the kettle on!
Re: Kit for different temperatures
« Reply #9 on: November 27, 2019, 02:14:18 pm »
In spring and autumn I'm a fan of the double jersey: short under long, so you can peel off as you warm up, though long under short also works.
I do not ride a great big Mercian, gangster tanwalls, fixed cog in the back.

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Kit for different temperatures
« Reply #10 on: November 27, 2019, 02:39:18 pm »

Hot to cold:

- Short sleeve jersey (NGNM Performance), non-bib shorts, pale arm covers, light cap, fingerless mits, drymax socks
- Short sleeve jersey (NGNM Performance), non-bib shorts, dark arm warmers, light cap, fullfinger gloves, drymax socks
- Short sleeve jersey (NGNM Performance), non-bib shorts, dark arm warmers, leg warmers, light cap, fullfinger gloves, drymax socks
- Short sleeve jersey (NGNM Performance), windproof gillet, non-bib shorts, dark arm warmers, leg warmers, light cap, fullfinger gloves (thicker), darn tough merino socks (light)
- Short sleeve jersey (NGNM Performance), windproof jacket (Paramo), non-bib shorts, dark arm warmers, leg warmers, light cap, fullfinger gloves (even thicker), darn tough socks (medium)
- Merino baselayer (120gsm), Short sleeve jersey (NGNM Performance), Paramo Quito jacket, non-bib shorts, dark arm warmers, leg warmers, fullfinger gloves (even thicker still), audax UK buff, merino wool buff, seal skins waterproof socks (medium)
- Merino baselayer (120gsm), Short sleeve jersey (NGNM Performance), Paramo Quito jacket, Paramo bentu fleece, winter tights, over shorts(cut down waterproof trousers), dark arm warmers, buffalo mitts, audax UK buff, merino wool buff, cold avenger face mask, seal skins waterproof socks (thick)

I've used this down to about -6°C in freezing rain. I think it would be good enough down to beyond -10°C. When it gets close to -20°C, it means I've probably made a navigational error, and I also need to start modifying the bike to stop the grease gelling. I'm pondering investing in a pair of ski goggles for wearing with the face mask to reduce fogging even further. 

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Re: Kit for different temperatures
« Reply #11 on: November 27, 2019, 03:23:06 pm »
Like others it depends of length of ride, whether I'll be stopping, and if there's a hot shower / change of clothes at the end of a ride.

I'll list the kit for my recumbent from hot to cold

Base Layers - Merino 150 weight short sleeve t shirts, merino 200 weight long sleeve top, merino 250 weight long sleeve top
Mid / outer - Vapourise vest, vapourise jacket, alpha direct jacket, Gore Phantom Jacket, primaloft vest (this is just for stop / mechanicals as usually too sweaty to ride in)
Shell - I don't wear traditional shells, see mid / outer for what is outermost.
Underwear - Merino
Legs - Cotton shorts with lycra stretch, running tights, polartech tights, cross country sking tights
Socks - summer cotton socks, winter weight merino socks, hiking socks,
Shoes - summer cycling shoes, winter cycling boots
Hands - Bare, stretch fleece, lightweight primaloft, fibre pile, gauntlet style fibre pile and Primaloft or mitts.
Head - Buff, cotton cap, merino cap, beanie, baraclava

That is pretty much the full list for year round. 

I go for the soft shell approach, so no outer waterproof shell.  Softshell is best summarised as

Maximum performance from a minimum of layers, often with one layer replacing two or more other layers (base, mid and shell). * Weather protection that is robust and achievable even though breathability takes PRIORITY over waterproofness. * Clothing that is comfortable in a wide range of temperatures and conditions, does not restrict the user and is tough

So in essence you have less layers (but more technical), that work over a wider range of temperatures and conditions, so you do not have to add and remove layers quite so much.   The Alpha direct jacket uses a pertex shell fabric that is not entirely windproof, preventing a build up of humidity or sweat. So after a hard climb, you don't feel sweaty and on the descent you can cool down. The Vapourise stuff is pretty windproof so can go over the top if needed. But the vapourise can also be used on their own as they have a micro fleece lining wicking sweat away and providing insulation.  They are a fearsome combination for keeping the weather out, but not leading to sweat soaking back to the skin when you stop or slow down.

Even in the winter the most you'll see on my top half is usually three layers, may four if I'm using some of the stuff I normally wear in summer. Winter in a way is easier because you'll often just put your stuff on and leave it on all day / night.  Spring is the awkward one as you often have a wide range of temps in a short period, so carry more stuff to put on or take off.

The coldest I've ridden in is -11C, and I've certainly been out in heavy continuous rain for hours in the above kit.

If you don’t make time for exercise now, sooner or later you’ll need to make time for ill health.

ElyDave

  • Royal and Ancient Polar Bear Society member 263583
Re: Kit for different temperatures
« Reply #12 on: December 03, 2019, 01:59:07 pm »
Hot to cold for me

Warm to hot - Short sleeve jersey, shorts or bib-shorts, summer shoes, fingerless mitts, short socks.  If particularly sunny, may wear v. thin merino or arm warmers for UV protection
cool to warm - merino baselayer, SS jersey, shorts or bibs, summer shoes, short socks, fingerless mitts, knee/arm warmers to taste. Lost my long fingered lightweight gloves
cold to cool - Merino baselayer, LS jersey, may add gilet, bib tights, long socks, winter boots, winter gloves, skullcap
colder - Merino baselayer, Softshell jacket, bib tights, long socks, winter boots, winter gloves and silk liner, skullcap and maybe snood over the mouth/nose 
effin cold - Merino baselayer, LS Jersey, Softshell jacket, bib tights, long socks and silk liners, winter boots, lobster mits and silk liner, skullcap and snood over mouth/nose 

Carry waterproof as needed
* for shorts/bib shorts, also include undershorts and MTB shorts, partic if on the recumbent
I tend to work with multiple thinner layers, and like to use merino baselayers these days as I find much better thermo regulation.  Apart from when I'm into silk-liner socks, as it gets cooler I start to use toe socks for most rides.
“Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.” –Charles Dickens

Re: Kit for different temperatures
« Reply #13 on: December 03, 2019, 02:09:19 pm »
Coldest I've ridden in was -25C in Finland.
For that I was riding in ski boots, Endura Wollie boolie socks, bib shorts, bib tights, ski trousers, long sleeved thermal base layer, merino long sleeved top, Nike windshirt (basically a long-sleeved top with windproof front, shoulders and arms with a light Pearl Izumi nylon shell jacket over the top, two buffs a thin merino hat, silk gloves and old Specialised defroster gloves.

I was toasty warm and had a lovely time. I was out for 6 hours, with two 30 minute breaks. My guide was completely exhausted by the half-way mark and we broke out e-bikes for the last hour.
I can thoroughly recommend the Kona fat bike as something everyone has to try!

For regular riding, I just layer appropriately, but I do have a mental list of trigger temperatures that make me decide if I want overshoes or not, or which gloves to wear.
My phone's weather forecasting software is good for that. I don;t care if it's accurate or not, all I need to know is of today is warmer or colder than yesterday.

FifeingEejit

  • Not Small
Re: Kit for different temperatures
« Reply #14 on: December 03, 2019, 03:23:37 pm »
Rough memory:
From hottest to coolest on dry days:

1: Summer Bib Shorts, thin merino socks, meco ss layer, ss cycling jersey, cotton cap, lid - Oddly enough I was too warm at times on PBP...
2: add arm and leg warmers to 1
3: swap arm warmers for l/s base layer
4: ss cycling jersey for autum/spring weight l/s jersey
5: swap leg warmers for tights
6: wear ss and ls base layers, swap thin socks for thick merino socks
7: swap summer shorts for thermal shorts
8: put thermal jacket over l/s jersey, put thin socks under thick socks
8.1 for duff light riding: thermal jacket has a black back, put orange club gillet over it
9: overshoes
10: wear showerproof over all of the above for extra layer

When it comes to hands it's mitts, then mitts plus defeet under gloves, then it's long fingers over defeet under gloves; after that I just bear the cold fingers as anything else is too cumbersome for me to operate the gears and brakes.


Re: Kit for different temperatures
« Reply #15 on: December 05, 2019, 04:29:22 pm »
Just adding some temperature notes against my clothing, based on rides in the past fortnight. Seems I could have a table of the clothing items and temperatures indicating at what point I add layers or change items (such as gloves)

Comfortable down to 5c

Beanie or Mavic merino cycling cap.
Merino long sleeves 150 weight base layer
Montane Alpha direct smock
Montane Primaloft Prism gloves.
Polartech fleece leggings
Summer cycling shoes, merino winter weight socks

Comfortable down to 1C (with fog) - may be fine for colder temps haven't tried combination at lower temps yet.

Beanie or Mavic merino cycling cap.
Merino long sleeves 150 weight base layer
Montane Alpha direct smock + Rab Vapour Rise Flex Gilet.
Montane fibre pile Tundra gloves (Prism gloves too cold)
Polartech fleece leggings
Winter boots (summer ones too cold)

Comfortable down to at least -11c and superb in grotty weather

Montane alpine stretch gloves - Primaloft and fibre pile gauntlet style.
Hestra Ski Mitts



If you don’t make time for exercise now, sooner or later you’ll need to make time for ill health.

Blodwyn Pig

  • what a nice chap
Re: Kit for different temperatures
« Reply #16 on: December 05, 2019, 05:59:03 pm »
the other day I went out, thick white frost on garage roof, grass, and fields, ice on car windows. Had..

80's Fleecy lined Campagnolo winter training hat, (with the band that drops down over the ears)
thin lightweight cycling top (retro, prob mid 90's), well worn.
Gore windstopper jacket, ( free from WCTD otp),
Retro 1980's Dutch knitted acrylic track top,
normal padded shorts,
Ron Hill tracksters.
normal thin socks
cycling shoes.
Primark thin fleecy gloves , with Lidl track mitts over.

Carried a Decthlon Gillet in case it got cold. ;)

Re: Kit for different temperatures
« Reply #17 on: December 06, 2019, 09:02:38 am »
I hate leggings because they mess up my knee tracking, so I wear shorts whatever the weather. You didn't include a warmer temperature setting without the base layer - I definitely have such a setting.
As for gloves, I only wear full fingers when it's wintery, otherwise it's mitts.
You wear shorts in sub-zero weather? Hard man!
Some people think that because they're riding a bike they have to bare their legs. :jurek: