Author Topic: Replacement Windows  (Read 535 times)

Replacement Windows
« on: November 26, 2019, 01:49:54 pm »
The windows in our house are coming towards the end of their life.  Several units have "failed" i.e. they now mist up internally, and the bathroom window just about opens and shuts, but something will give up sooner or later and it will then be stuck open.  I could get the sealed units replaced, although I suspect that will involve ultimately replacing them all over a year or so and it is possible that the bathroom window could be repaired but I am coming to the conclusion that it would be better to bite the bullet and replace the lot.  The current windows are uPVC replacements and would have been the very cheapest available back in the mid 90's - the previous owners did not believe in spending any more than absolutely necessary.  Any replacement is going to be more energy efficient than the existing ones, although I know that the "pay-back" time on the energy saving will be a lot longer than the life of the windows

So what to get?  I could replace with more uPVC (any recommendations?), or aluminium.  I don't really want wood as that will require painting in a few years.  I would rather pay more and get something that will last longer and perform better.  I like the composite windows (wooden frames with aluminium casements) but they will not fit without major works to cut back the plaster and replace the window boards as the original single glazed wooden windows were only 75mm deep, the composite ones are about 125mm deep or more.  Is it worth paying a bit extra for triple glazing?  On paper uPVC looks to perform slightly better (energy wise) than aluminium, but there is not much in it.




hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Replacement Windows
« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2019, 02:29:47 pm »
We had a local firm replace our glazing with uPVC Pilkington sealed units 8 years ago,

The glazing has been OK.

They also replaced our front door - Pilkington again. I am not impressed by the discolouration of frames of these glazed door panels. They face north-east so only get strong sunlight on summer mornings. https://www.google.com/maps/@51.5972551,-0.2702175,3a,15y,233.34h,89.26t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1swHc6gEqpMYbiNVyflnk1lg!2e0!7i16384!8i8192

Blodwyn Pig

  • what a nice chap
Re: Replacement Windows
« Reply #2 on: November 26, 2019, 02:56:15 pm »
why not replace the bathroom window completely, as it's borked, then just replace sealed units as and when. What makes you think windows now are any better than they were then? Its plastic!.. Only difference will be that later ones have a bigger air gap.  But if you replace them all with new ''''efficient!!!!!!!!'''''''' windows, you will never recoup the cost, via the savings in thermal efficiency.   Just do as above, then spend your hard earned, (or willfully borrowed) dosh on other things. 

Re: Replacement Windows
« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2019, 03:45:56 pm »
Nearly 20 years ago we had plastic to replace the very very old wooden single glazed sash windows.  They could easily have been 100 years old.

With hindsight the plastic is nasty but efficient.

When we replaced the front door four years ago (wood but probably from the seventies) we had wood again.  If I had the opportunity I'd have wooden windows but that bloody plastic will last for decades!

Gattopardo

  • Lord of the sith
  • Overseaing the building of the death star
Re: Replacement Windows
« Reply #4 on: November 26, 2019, 08:59:46 pm »
Hello,

Is the beading internal or exturnal?  The plastic will be fine for ever.  I'd look at the seals on the window openers and the hinges and maybe replace a few if needed as these do wear out.

I'd just replace the glass with 'modern' energy saving glass.  More for the hassle and any repairs and redecoration after.

Re: Replacement Windows
« Reply #5 on: November 26, 2019, 09:09:00 pm »
Might be worth getting a quote to replace the glazing, seals/gaskets mastic surrounds and furniture from a specialist - they do exist. Older upvc windows will have thinner glazing units than current models and will probably have aluminium glazing separation which does not lend itself to thermal efficiency (or preventing condensation). It is worth noting some modern profiles do not provide for future gasket replacement.
On the other hand, if you shop around you can probably obtain a really good deal locally for new replacements with triple glazing at this time of year. Note triple glazing is very heavy for any doors. Nationals tend to be silly money. Composite front doors rather than plastic. Don't just go for the cheapest and get more than one quote. Larger window frames should be fully metal reinforced.

Insist that any associated building work  (should there be any) is undertaken by an appropriate tradesperson -  not a window installer.

Installer needs to be Fensa accredited to self certify new installation as this falls under the building regs.
Get a bicycle. You will never regret it, if you live- Mark Twain

fd3

Re: Replacement Windows
« Reply #6 on: November 26, 2019, 11:23:13 pm »
The flip side of wood is that if you paint them every couple of years they will outlast plastic.  If you want new windows talk to a builder, they should be able to utterly smash deals you get from UPVC sales companies.  Similarly swapping out glass panels is a straightforward job, not saying I'd do it without instructionables/youtube but you should be able to get them changed for much less than a new window.
[/I could be wrong]

Re: Replacement Windows
« Reply #7 on: November 27, 2019, 09:15:05 am »
As with any building work, or anything else for that matter, I’d try to get lots of good local feedback from people you know, or who your friends know.
I’d also look for local firms that have been there for a long time, and who will give you addresses locally where they have worked.
Personally, I’m fortunate that a cycling friend is a builder. He didn’t do the work of fitting new windows, but was happy to project manage it for me. He recommended the fitting company, but then kept totally on top of them in a way I wouldn’t have been able ( or brave) enough to. Because he was “ trade” he also saved me money whilst still making a decent fee for himself.

Re: Replacement Windows
« Reply #8 on: November 27, 2019, 10:41:15 am »
why not replace the bathroom window completely, as it's borked, then just replace sealed units as and when. What makes you think windows now are any better than they were then? Its plastic!.. Only difference will be that later ones have a bigger air gap.  But if you replace them all with new ''''efficient!!!!!!!!'''''''' windows, you will never recoup the cost, via the savings in thermal efficiency.   Just do as above, then spend your hard earned, (or willfully borrowed) dosh on other things.

* Yes, the air gap is bigger on modern double glazing (typically 16mm), but there are also options for the gap to be argon filled to reduce heat transfer and condensation.
* modern double glazing also offers options of a range of film coatings.  So if you have a south facing room that overheats in the summer, you can get a coated glass that reduces solar gain, whilst retaining heat from the other direction to remain efficient in the winter.  It can work very effectively (my conservatory says so :))
* The insulating benefits of double or triple glazing do not outweigh the cost compared to a simple single glazed solution.  However, you take the benefits in other ways such as reduced maintenance, better comfort and reduced operating expenditure on heating bills.  The home will also heat up quicker and stay warm longer providing a more even temperature.  Environmentally, good double glazing (e.g. argon filled, with energy retaining coating) may well have a lower lifecycle impact than triple glazing once embodied carbon is considered.

Wood vs PVCu vs aluminium is probably a personal taste issue.  We installed decent engineered wood frames 5 years ago and they show no sign of needing to be painted yet.  Possibly in 2021.  PVCu is environmentally harmful to produce and difficult to recycle, and when it is recycled it is typically mixed with virgin polymer to produce yet more plastic products.  Aluminium is fully recyclable.  Aesthetics aside, the most important issue is to ensure the design avoids thermal bridges between different window elements otherwise you'll get cold spots where condensation can develop, and where heat escapes.

Re: Replacement Windows
« Reply #9 on: December 02, 2019, 11:25:49 pm »
If you're going to replace the windows, don't discount wood. We fitted wood framed double glazing units in our last flat in 2006 (from https://www.blairswindows.co.uk/. When we moved last year I touched in the paint on a few window beads on the south facing windows and that was it.