Author Topic: Wheeled, travel rucksacks with day pack  (Read 623 times)

Wheeled, travel rucksacks with day pack
« on: December 04, 2019, 04:40:47 pm »
Anyone use such a travel bag? Any recommendations? Any good ones?

Re: Wheeled, travel rucksacks with day pack
« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2019, 04:54:21 pm »
Spookily my wife ordered one just the other week:-

https://cabinmax.com/en/home/193-181-cabin-x-one-hybrid-carry-on-trolley-backpack-and-day-bag.html

Specifically to fit the carry on luggage requirements for FlyBe (55x35x20) although this requires the daypack to be removed.

You'd struggle to keep to within those dimensions if you pack it too full, but it satisfied the checkin desk checks at both LHR and NQY last week without it being rammed full.

Build quality looks ok and it rolls along quite well on its wheels. Haven't tried either the main bag or the day pack as a rucksack though.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Re: Wheeled, travel rucksacks with day pack
« Reply #2 on: December 05, 2019, 02:10:13 am »
Wheeled travel rucksacks:
https://www.osprey.com/us/en/category/travel/wheeled-bags/?features=Wheeled%20Carry%20Conversion

Day pack designed to be attached to any of the above:
https://www.osprey.com/us/en/product/daylite-travel-pack-DAYLITRVL_550.html

Haven't used Osprey packs myself, but the outdoor shop I work in sells them by the truckload and customers love them. Extremely well made, comfortable to carry, and generally very well thought out.

ETA: Sorry about the US-specific website, but Osprey does sell packs in the UK as well.

Re: Wheeled, travel rucksacks with day pack
« Reply #3 on: December 05, 2019, 08:16:58 am »
Well, I have both CabinMax and Osprey bags.

CabinMax are a great range of carry on bags of good quality, made to a weight and price, I would recommend them without hesitation for their purpose. I have two of theirs, one is like this one
https://cabinmax.com/en/home/218-tallinn-55x40x25cm-carry-on-backpack-great-for-easyjet.html

which I use for travel for work, when I have a bike at the other end. It has the benefit of integral laptop pocket, handles on the side to carry along with usable backpack straps. Now I realise that there may be reasons for it, but you may want to question your  wheels AND backpack vector. If it is carry on, do you really think you need wheels? lack of wheels makes the backpack-bit far more versatile and helps maximise the actual carry volume and weight.

The other CabinMax bag I have is a messenger style laptop bag, very strong and lightweight with useful pockets, but they don't appear to do that any more

Osprey bags are in a completely different league. Functional, designed by people who use them and as strong as they get. They also have a lifetime guarantee they stand behind: They will either repair the bag for a reasonable charge or replace free of charge. I've had two replacements on that scheme over the years. This gives you the confidence that your considerable investment is protected. FTR, I have a few Osprey backpacks for different purposes and use their "shuttle" range for luggage.

Re: Wheeled, travel rucksacks with day pack
« Reply #4 on: December 05, 2019, 02:30:17 pm »
It's for hold use not cabin use. It's for a ski holiday so bulky clothes for cold weather. About 60 to 70 litres capacity.

I'd like a day pack with it.

Like osprey sacks over designed at times but their trolley hybrid bags look good. I think £160 for the main bag and extra £60 for the compatible day pack. Gets pricey that brand.

Cabin brand looks good but mostly lower volume for cabin use. Kathmandu do one. Not a looker and possibly not as durable as osprey but should do the job.

Re: Wheeled, travel rucksacks with day pack
« Reply #5 on: December 05, 2019, 02:49:01 pm »
It's for hold use not cabin use. It's for a ski holiday so bulky clothes for cold weather. About 60 to 70 litres capacity.

Ah.

We had a Eurohike one in 2008 when we did two months in South America. Much cheaper (current model of a Eurohike Colossus II 65/15 is ~£50).

No idea about the more modern ones but ours is 2008 was fine until the handle broke which meant it was a pain to wheel around (annoying given we were moving towns every 2-3 days). Definitely felt like a compromise. As a rucksack it has bulky plastic base and wheels that can rub if you don't get the positioning right.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Re: Wheeled, travel rucksacks with day pack
« Reply #6 on: December 05, 2019, 02:56:10 pm »
It's for hold use not cabin use. It's for a ski holiday so bulky clothes for cold weather. About 60 to 70 litres capacity.

I'd like a day pack with it.

Like osprey sacks over designed at times but their trolley hybrid bags look good. I think £160 for the main bag and extra £60 for the compatible day pack. Gets pricey that brand.

Cabin brand looks good but mostly lower volume for cabin use. Kathmandu do one. Not a looker and possibly not as durable as osprey but should do the job.

If it's for hold use, how often will you need the wheels and how often would you be just as well off carrying it like a rucksack? Wheels are going to add bulk, weight and cost whether you're carrying it in the cabin or putting it in the hold. Osprey's non-wheeled travel packs do come with a day pack, and they carry more comfortably than the wheeled versions.

Re: Wheeled, travel rucksacks with day pack
« Reply #7 on: December 05, 2019, 03:09:00 pm »
Ahhhh for ski. That's different. Do you have boots? Why are you worried about bag and daypack as a unit? You're far better off getting specialist items.

Here's what Sportpursuit have at the moment https://www.sportpursuit.com/accessories/backpacks-bags-cases?sport=Skiing - the Dare2Be looks to be a good bag and the SnowMule as a backpack

if you don't have an account at the moment, "my" signup code is https://www.sportpursuit.com/join/Ham - you may as well use that, or if you have a friend who has SportPursuit account use theirs, they will get £5 if you end up buying. Also, do check prices with other providers, Sportpursuit can be cheap, but not always.

Re: Wheeled, travel rucksacks with day pack
« Reply #8 on: December 05, 2019, 05:02:20 pm »
I've looked at the osprey ones and they're a good design. No plastic bits near the back. The wheels look to go outside the fully padded and load bearing hip belts that are straight of their proper hiking backpacks I think. The back exposed when you release the shoulder straps from the zip up cover is a trampoline type like their hiking packs. Yes boxy shape but very good design. Certainly weight bearing on your hips.

Some cheaper ones look uncomfortable with the plastic against the back. It does matter spending the money when you're getting a compromise product that's part way between two different types of product like this.

Jaded

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Re: Wheeled, travel rucksacks with day pack
« Reply #9 on: December 05, 2019, 05:53:17 pm »
Just to add a note of experience (not mine, someone else) when you wheel a backpack rucksack through dog poo and then put it on your back, it can cause a bit of mess.
If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.

Re: Wheeled, travel rucksacks with day pack
« Reply #10 on: December 05, 2019, 08:17:35 pm »
Duly noted.

Point is I'm only likely to wheel around parts of a dog free airport and rucksack mode outside.  But you raise a good point. Stinky but good.

Re: Wheeled, travel rucksacks with day pack
« Reply #11 on: December 05, 2019, 08:39:31 pm »
I use a big North Face Rolling Thunder 30" bag for skiing, and then take a separate rucksack for the journey, plus a small cheap rucksack (for skiing[1]). Got it in a sale (£160 instead of £240) and it's worth it in my opinion - really well made and has stood up well to a good 3 or 4 years or family holidays with barely any visible wear and tear.

It's solidly built and a comfy handle so it was fine pulling it 400 yards or so around various resorts when (due to whatever reason) your transfer can't drop you off or pick you up from your accommodation. I've never wished it could be worn as a rucksack.

1. Some random cheap Mountain Warehouse bag with compression straps like this one: https://www.mountainwarehouse.com/bolt-18l-backpack-p16799.aspx/blue/ It's just used to carry a few things (normal glasses in a hard case, spare layer, snack, water, nuun tablets, suncream, etc. The compression straps are perfect for carrying a pair or even two pairs of skis - the straps hook under the bindings. When we go on a family trip it means I can carry 4 sets of skis whilst the smalls carry (and fight with) the poles.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Re: Wheeled, travel rucksacks with day pack
« Reply #12 on: December 05, 2019, 09:21:26 pm »
Never thought about it sack for skiing. Mind you we're beginners and stay at resorts you can ski from. Last year you crossed from a side door to the lifts and skied back to the door. Lunch at hotel and back out. I think this year it's the same. Don't see a need for a sack when skiing but might be useful.

Re: Wheeled, travel rucksacks with day pack
« Reply #13 on: December 05, 2019, 09:52:11 pm »
Last few skiing holidays have been lovely blue skies so I've been skiing in t-shirt or a fleece, this means no ski jacket with twelfty-seven pockets for storing everything.

If I can get away without wearing a rucksack I will, but I've got used to having a few optional extras with me. On the adults only trips we tend to be out for the entire day (first lifts to last) and sometimes buy a sandwich to eat on the slopes somewhere for lunch so it's barely noticeable. On the family trips I've got a full packed lunch for 8 of us but the skiing is rather more sedate.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Re: Wheeled, travel rucksacks with day pack
« Reply #14 on: December 05, 2019, 10:51:43 pm »
Never thought about it sack for skiing. Mind you we're beginners and stay at resorts you can ski from. Last year you crossed from a side door to the lifts and skied back to the door. Lunch at hotel and back out. I think this year it's the same. Don't see a need for a sack when skiing but might be useful.

Ski in/ski out is very nice, and addictive, but generally adds to the cost and can't be guaranteed (with some exceptions like Arc 1950 where I'm off to in a couple of weeks). Skiing with a backpack has some wrinkles, eg, you really DO NOT want loose straps and buckles, getting them stuck in lift equipment provides potential entertainment for onlookers, but it's not to be recommended. But in any event, a backpack is useful for walking around the resort, shopping etc.

If you are a new skier and you carry on, you will almost certainly want to buy your own boots, and a large bag like the one I linked to is best, separate boot compartment(s) still better.

Re: Wheeled, travel rucksacks with day pack
« Reply #15 on: December 05, 2019, 11:24:50 pm »
In Norway last winter we had fun getting boots. They supplied the wrong sizes for me and my son. They even supplied different sized left and right. Then they failed to get the bindings set right. Then they realised our son had the wrong sized skis. Took an hour or more to sort out with the queues. Not good because it nearly made us late for a family,  private lesson. My son's and my first time on skis so a private lesson really helped especially since group classes only started the day later.

Still,  ended up having fun.

Kids learn quickly on found and it's easier to learn without poles. They really aren't as useful as you'd think when you're starting out. Btw I was proud of how well our son picked it up. But he's got no fear. The instructor took the kids down the longest piste,  a green. At the steepest part near the end where harder pistes join she made the kids zigzag down following her. Our son got bored so he dropped them and went straight down as fast as he could.

I didn't know that but later that day we all did the same piste together. My partner who has skied a bit was supposed to keep an eye on him because I was still barely holding it together. Son shot off as fast as possible,  partner zigzagged slowly. Son was about to go round the corner. So muggings here had to try and catch him. One of my scariest things I've done. Bear in mind I've kayakers off 29'waterfalls into grade 4/5 Rapids before you can  possibly guess how rubbish I was at skiing.

I caught him up but on my way took a bend,  hit a bump and took off. I landed on outside ski and as my inside ski hit the snow I somehow took the turn. After that run my confidence rose and I enjoyed it more.

Must admit i did enjoy racing our son.

Looking forward to this  trip. No idea if I've remembered what I've learnt. It'll be fun but not sure if I should do more lessons.

Re: Wheeled, travel rucksacks with day pack
« Reply #16 on: December 06, 2019, 07:30:29 am »
Ah, Norway. That explains a lot, was talking to a Danish colleague about ski in Norway just yesterday, basically, it's cold, runs are short in comparison to the Alps.

You'll find the skiing thread over there ---->, but YES do take lessons.

Re: Wheeled, travel rucksacks with day pack
« Reply #17 on: December 06, 2019, 08:15:52 am »
Longest was 1100m, the green run we did.

Sweden this year. Love Sweden to visit. Gothenburg felt like I was home. Found out last week that great,  great grandparents left Sweden for America from Gothenburg. Perhaps that's why.

Seriously off topic but hey,  way it goes.

If we had skis there's a make off bag I've seen where the skis go in one part and other kit in the other. So the skis, boots and clothes all go in one bag I think. Douchebag is the brand. Having seen family groups collecting ski bags,  boot bags and suitcases from the reclaim,  plus cabin rucksack. Well that's a lot of bags for a family of 4. Makes sense if you can get it all in one.

Re: Wheeled, travel rucksacks with day pack
« Reply #18 on: December 06, 2019, 09:59:25 am »
....runs are short in comparison to the Alps......

...Longest was 1100m, the green run we did....


As a green run, that will likely have a vertical descent of 100m. By contrast, Les Arcs where I'm off to has an 8Km Black/Red with >2Km descent.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not criticising in the slightest, enjoying greens on your first trip is the key to a lifetime ski addiction, but you WILL graduate to the steeper slopes, and lessons is the quickest and safest way to achieve that. You don't say what time of year you're going, if you're looking for a great family resort for early years skiing, Val Cenis is hard to beat. There's a 10Km green run winding its way down the mountain there (actually, the road that leads across into Italy in the summer) with nice reds going straight down. It's also less expensive than some of the better known French resorts.

Re: Wheeled, travel rucksacks with day pack
« Reply #19 on: December 06, 2019, 11:01:58 am »
We're off day after boxing day. A week only. Two flights each east via Stockholm to Are. No train journey or coach journey this year.

Mrs Pingu

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Re: Wheeled, travel rucksacks with day pack
« Reply #20 on: December 08, 2019, 09:31:03 pm »
As someone who has used a small cabin sized roller/rucksack, there's no way I'd want to be carrying around a 70L bag on my back that's set up for rolling - the stiff bits would just be too sore. Unless you're going to be traipsing up a mountain with it a roller only one should be fine.
Do not clench. It only makes it worse.

Re: Wheeled, travel rucksacks with day pack
« Reply #21 on: December 09, 2019, 09:47:31 am »
Reminds me, I used my old Eurohike 65L thing with wheels on it for PBP, so I cycled the 12km to/from my hotel in Plaisir with it on my back, and crossed Paris with it (although mostly by RER/Metro but still 5km or so of cycling) when I went to CDG to fly home.

As I said before, it just takes a bit of care to get the positioning right (no different from any big rucksack really) and once the straps are setup ok it shouldn't rub.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

hellymedic

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Re: Wheeled, travel rucksacks with day pack
« Reply #22 on: December 09, 2019, 12:26:54 pm »
I suppose that in general men have stronger, broader shoulders, and a longer torso than women. That might make a larger backpack more tolerable/feasible. If I could walk, I'd concur with Mrs P.
Other backs are available...

Re: Wheeled, travel rucksacks with day pack
« Reply #23 on: December 09, 2019, 04:55:10 pm »
I suppose that in general men have stronger, broader shoulders, and a longer torso than women. That might make a larger backpack more tolerable/feasible.

That's why backpacks are frequently made in men's and women's versions, and that's why women's backpacks generally have shorter frames, as measured from the attachment of the hipbelt to the attachment of the shoulder straps.