Author Topic: Pavement parking consultation  (Read 1690 times)

Re: Pavement parking consultation
« Reply #25 on: September 01, 2020, 02:18:20 pm »
It might be a step forward if we could address its endemic nature. I occasionally park a hired minibus outside our house, on the road, because there's room and still significantly more than half the road width available. But people still park small cars on the pavement in the same spot, obstructing buggies etc.

ian

  • feat. Undead Jess & Finestre, Queen of Hell
Re: Pavement parking consultation
« Reply #26 on: September 01, 2020, 02:28:08 pm »
I think they're more worried about losing a wing mirror than anything else. That seems to be case on a road near us, they could park on the road and leave one lane, but they block the pavement to leave 1.5 lanes.

The other habit, further down the road, is drivers using the pavement outside their garages to store their cars like it's their driveway, forcing any pedestrians off the curb and into the road to go around them. Once they know they can get away with something, it becomes habitual.

We walked through a fairly careworn estate the other day, cars were everywhere. Every pavement, every bit of green space, had been turned over to parking. It was basically a grubby car park.
Support the Great Surrey Bear Census 2020

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Pavement parking consultation
« Reply #27 on: September 01, 2020, 02:45:48 pm »
If you need an additional bedroom for your kids, you don't simply extend your house onto the pavement outside.
With further "relaxation" of planning processes...
This ain't really your life, ain't nothing but a movie
Ain't nothing but a badly written novel

Re: Pavement parking consultation
« Reply #28 on: September 01, 2020, 03:00:56 pm »
I think they're more worried about losing a wing mirror than anything else. That seems to be case on a road near us, they could park on the road and leave one lane, but they block the pavement to leave 1.5 lanes.

One of my least favourite markers of shithole surburbia is perfectly wide streets were everyone still parks two wheels up to keep the road clear for mostly imaginary traffic.

Interestingly clicking around that particular hole, narrower streets seem to have less pavement parking, and it seems to be contagious by street - either everyone does or no one does.

ian

  • feat. Undead Jess & Finestre, Queen of Hell
Re: Pavement parking consultation
« Reply #29 on: September 01, 2020, 03:24:55 pm »
There's an entire fucking lorry parked (unnecessarily) on the pavement in that one.
Support the Great Surrey Bear Census 2020

Re: Pavement parking consultation
« Reply #30 on: September 01, 2020, 05:35:51 pm »
If you need an additional bedroom for your kids, you don't simply extend your house onto the pavement outside.
With further "relaxation" of planning processes...
I could do with a home office,  maybe I should set a shed up on the road/ pavement outside my house.

Eddington  96miles

Re: Pavement parking consultation
« Reply #31 on: September 01, 2020, 05:50:37 pm »
One thing the news reports miss out is that while it’s banned by default in London, there are plenty of streets with signposted pavement parking, and many more where the council turns a blind eye, especially in the outer boroughs.

 I’d expect very little to change in practice.
But in order to mark bays for pavdmeng parking tge space needs to be assessed to ensure enough space remains for pavement users.  It also keeps cars from leaving to little room as the bays should be clearly defined. Long term the solution should be to move the kerb inwards to maintain a set pavement width,  with cars kept below the pavement level.
Sounds reasonable. A very narrow (or otherwise unusable) pavement can be worse than none.

Mind you, I can think of a few streets where even that is likely to result in the impossibility of parking on at least one side if not both, which obviously creates all sorts of backlash. Quite easy to foresee that in some cases pavements will be removed instead.
I'm having trouble inferring tone here.
I do not advocate very narrow pavements.  The process is;
1) define minimum width of pavement
2) determine if re assigning space in excess of this increases parking
3) Mark bays on pavement showing extent of parking allowed
4) adjust kerb to bring in line with alliwed parking

Currently allowing cats to park as far on our of the road as individual drivers decide is the worst as it reduces space on the pavement and on the road.

My road is the worst as it is less than 3 cars wide,  my side has full parking occupancy,  the other side has single yellow line.  This implies that parking on the other side is allowed at certain times,  but is not possible without blocking the road,  therefore pavement parking is implied as correct.

But cars parked block talmost he entire pavement or prevent the bin let/ fire engine driving through the road,  they can't leave enough space for both large vehicles and pedestrians.

Eddington  96miles

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Pavement parking consultation
« Reply #32 on: September 01, 2020, 06:57:39 pm »
Now I'm confused. When you say "move the kerb inwards" do you mean towards the centre of the road or towards the boundaries?
This ain't really your life, ain't nothing but a movie
Ain't nothing but a badly written novel

Re: Pavement parking consultation
« Reply #33 on: September 01, 2020, 07:13:44 pm »
Digging up pavements and/or realigning kerbs has happened precisely nowhere in London AFAICT, except maybe occasionally as part of a larger public realm scheme. It is extremely expensive.

Assuming the law passes either:
- Bays will be painted on/straddling the pavement.
- No bays will be marked; drivers will continue to park as they have; the council won’t do anything about it.
- No bays will be marked; drivers will successfully be repelled via rigorous enforcement into either parking in the carriageway or parking elsewhere.

Those are your options.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
This ain't really your life, ain't nothing but a movie
Ain't nothing but a badly written novel

Re: Pavement parking consultation
« Reply #35 on: September 03, 2020, 03:16:04 pm »
The backlash has started: Parents could be hit with £70 fine if they park on pavements during school run
'Areas are likely to become even more congested as parents battle to find a space to park'


Cry me a river

If there weren't so many cars on the pavement, then maybe the kiddies could walk on them from very slightly further away.

I live near a (small, rural) school and am constantly appalled at the shockingly poor driving & parking. Completely blocking a junction is considered entirely acceptable. I've even had an argument with one parent who insisted that they weren't parked because they were still in the car and so 'waiting'. My point was that their car was on my driveway; I didn't really care about the technical status.

Re: Pavement parking consultation
« Reply #36 on: September 03, 2020, 04:05:51 pm »
Digging up pavements and/or realigning kerbs has happened precisely nowhere in London AFAICT, except maybe occasionally as part of a larger public realm scheme. It is extremely expensive.

Assuming the law passes either:
- Bays will be painted on/straddling the pavement.
- No bays will be marked; drivers will continue to park as they have; the council won’t do anything about it.
- No bays will be marked; drivers will successfully be repelled via rigorous enforcement into either parking in the carriageway or parking elsewhere.

Those are your options.
Yes it is expensive, but we have grade separation of mirror vehicles and people for a reason,  and removal of that should only be a temporary solution.
Potentially this could happen when the road is next resurfaced.  A kerb between parking bays and pavement also prevents cars stealing more of the pavement than intended

Eddington  96miles

Re: Pavement parking consultation
« Reply #37 on: September 03, 2020, 09:31:06 pm »
Yes it is expensive, but we have grade separation of mirror vehicles and people for a reason,  and removal of that should only be a temporary solution.

Temporary solutions have a habit of sticking around for a very long time.

I'm talking about what's likely to happen rather than what should happen.

Quote
Potentially this could happen when the road is next resurfaced.  A kerb between parking bays and pavement also prevents cars stealing more of the pavement than intended

Moving the kerb means digging up the foundations and probably repositioning / relevelling utilities. It's an order of magnitude harder than resurfacing.