Author Topic: Tales from the Lock-Down  (Read 34921 times)

Mr Larrington

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Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #800 on: August 28, 2020, 11:22:41 am »
The variation by state is weird - was in Washington DC and the rate was X on clothing, drove 2 spits into Virginia to a massive shopping mall (Tysons Corner) and tax was about 25% lower - ditto variables in the New England states.    But then in the corners between France/Switzerland and France/Germany there is a massive influx of Swiss & Germans to French hypermarkets as prices and taxes are lower.

When I was last in the area the bridges across the Mighty Colorado south of the Hoover Dam saw a good deal of use from Nevadan residents taking advantage of the much lower price of motor-spirit in Arizona.  Plus in those parts the casinos are in NV but the hotels in AZ.
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Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #801 on: August 28, 2020, 02:24:13 pm »

Every state has it's own rules (some states, like Delaware and New Hampshire, have no sales tax – in others it varies over different categories) and cities and municipalities (in some states, not all) can also have taxes added. Sometimes it's a local sales tax, other times you get odd stuff, like police levies. Then there's special taxes for alcohol and food. On top of that, many states have an annual sales tax holiday.


I think Americans do this shit just to be contrary. It makes them feel like they have more control locally than they really do.

Oregon also has no sales tax, so it is possible to go to the shop with $10 and buy $10 worth of stuff, rather than desperately trying to add up items to $8.42 (and putting the loaf of bread back, because you've just realised it (a) costs $4 and (b) appears to be 150 calories a slice). Of course, Oregon's great foible is that you can't pump your own gas. Despite being told several times by my brother about this, habit forced me out of the car the on the first occasion of needing fuel, resulting in nearly being tackled to the floor by the gas station attendant. Once you get used to it, it's actually quite nice, you just sit there like a spare part. Of course, the first time you drive out of the state does require you to remember not to just sit there like a lemon.

FifeingEejit

  • Not Small
Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #802 on: August 28, 2020, 02:41:41 pm »
The variation by state is weird - was in Washington DC and the rate was X on clothing, drove 2 spits into Virginia to a massive shopping mall (Tysons Corner) and tax was about 25% lower - ditto variables in the New England states.    But then in the corners between France/Switzerland and France/Germany there is a massive influx of Swiss & Germans to French hypermarkets as prices and taxes are lower.

It's a fair comparison, the level of Federating up to the Federation in the US is reasonably low, in some areas the theoretically Confederal EU has been granted more powers by its members than the US states have their federal government.

The major shopping market (https://goo.gl/maps/dnDwnMG5wHu8dNH17) for Basel however is in Germany not France, due to the differing political situation in relation to customs between France&Germany and Switzerland, there's a dedicated exit for Switzerland that leads consumers directly into Swiss customs car boot checks, and they check every boot.
The plaza was being rebuild when I was there, but you can get a decent look at it with a bit of clicking in streetview (Where many angles are also of it being rebuilt), the set up is such that vehicles entering Germany are slowed down, but those entering Switzerland have to stop.
They had no interest in pedestrians, so I guess if you want to smuggle toothpaste into Switzerland, then loading the lining of your jacket up spiv like is the way to do it.

robgul

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Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #803 on: August 28, 2020, 02:44:19 pm »

Every state has it's own rules (some states, like Delaware and New Hampshire, have no sales tax – in others it varies over different categories) and cities and municipalities (in some states, not all) can also have taxes added. Sometimes it's a local sales tax, other times you get odd stuff, like police levies. Then there's special taxes for alcohol and food. On top of that, many states have an annual sales tax holiday.


I think Americans do this shit just to be contrary. It makes them feel like they have more control locally than they really do.

Oregon also has no sales tax, so it is possible to go to the shop with $10 and buy $10 worth of stuff, rather than desperately trying to add up items to $8.42 (and putting the loaf of bread back, because you've just realised it (a) costs $4 and (b) appears to be 150 calories a slice). Of course, Oregon's great foible is that you can't pump your own gas. Despite being told several times by my brother about this, habit forced me out of the car the on the first occasion of needing fuel, resulting in nearly being tackled to the floor by the gas station attendant. Once you get used to it, it's actually quite nice, you just sit there like a spare part. Of course, the first time you drive out of the state does require you to remember not to just sit there like a lemon.

Isn't this just what the US is - 48, 49, 50 or however many* states there are now each vying to be a "small, separate country"

* when I was at school it was 48 until Alaska joined - and I know that Hawaii is 50 (Book him Danno!) - I believe there are now more, or some "associated states"?

ian

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Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #804 on: August 28, 2020, 03:14:11 pm »

Every state has it's own rules (some states, like Delaware and New Hampshire, have no sales tax – in others it varies over different categories) and cities and municipalities (in some states, not all) can also have taxes added. Sometimes it's a local sales tax, other times you get odd stuff, like police levies. Then there's special taxes for alcohol and food. On top of that, many states have an annual sales tax holiday.


I think Americans do this shit just to be contrary. It makes them feel like they have more control locally than they really do.

Oregon also has no sales tax, so it is possible to go to the shop with $10 and buy $10 worth of stuff, rather than desperately trying to add up items to $8.42 (and putting the loaf of bread back, because you've just realised it (a) costs $4 and (b) appears to be 150 calories a slice). Of course, Oregon's great foible is that you can't pump your own gas. Despite being told several times by my brother about this, habit forced me out of the car the on the first occasion of needing fuel, resulting in nearly being tackled to the floor by the gas station attendant. Once you get used to it, it's actually quite nice, you just sit there like a spare part. Of course, the first time you drive out of the state does require you to remember not to just sit there like a lemon.

Isn't this just what the US is - 48, 49, 50 or however many* states there are now each vying to be a "small, separate country"

* when I was at school it was 48 until Alaska joined - and I know that Hawaii is 50 (Book him Danno!) - I believe there are now more, or some "associated states"?

There are territories – Puerto Rico and Guam – where everyone is a US citizen but they don't have congressional voting rights (and other perks of statehood). Other likes American Samoa accord the residents have an American Nationals status (like we do with British Nationals) – I have no idea on their actual Constitutional status. Then there's Washington DC ('taxation without representation'). Puerto Rico is moderately likely to become the 51st state.

Oregon doesn't have a state sales tax, but cities and towns can set their own (though they generally don't). But they have a meals and booze tax (the last time we were there, they were having a holiday on this though, and cheap beer is something of a boon if you're visiting Oregon, though they make it back on the hotel room tax).

But yes, Americans love tax. Completing the infamous Federal and state 1040 forms (their income declarations) is an annual ceremony. Americans lock themselves in their houses and probably in nothing more than their underwear and a sheen of sweat, sort through shoe boxes of diligently retained receipts. I remember being berated because I hadn't kept every receipt ever. Or any of them since I'd been criminally unaware of tax declarations until that point.

NJ also doesn't let you fill up your own car with gas. For good reason, if you'd seen them drive you'd consider it likely they'd probably try drinking the gasoline (probably better than Olde English 800 admittedly). I've never filled my own car as I always used to fill up there rather than the more expensive NY or CT.
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citoyen

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Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #805 on: August 28, 2020, 03:32:44 pm »
I know that Hawaii is 50 (Book him Danno!)

I can't believe I never twigged this before but that's where "five-o" as slang for the police (as used in The Wire) comes from, isn't it?
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ian

  • feat. Undead Jess & Finestre, Queen of Hell
Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #806 on: August 28, 2020, 03:43:53 pm »
Yes, such was the impact of the TV show. Book him Danno! indeed.
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Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #807 on: August 28, 2020, 06:32:43 pm »
Off-topic slightly, but US territories such a Guam and Saipan have (or used to) allow US firms such as Levis to produce clothing using cheap (imported) Chinese labour, and have it tagged as 'Made in the USA'.

Mr Larrington

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Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #808 on: August 28, 2020, 06:50:21 pm »
Oregon also has no sales tax, so it is possible to go to the shop with $10 and buy $10 worth of stuff, rather than desperately trying to add up items to $8.42 (and putting the loaf of bread back, because you've just realised it (a) costs $4 and (b) appears to be 150 calories a slice). Of course, Oregon's great foible is that you can't pump your own gas. Despite being told several times by my brother about this, habit forced me out of the car the on the first occasion of needing fuel, resulting in nearly being tackled to the floor by the gas station attendant. Once you get used to it, it's actually quite nice, you just sit there like a spare part. Of course, the first time you drive out of the state does require you to remember not to just sit there like a lemon.

Rural counties of Oregon have allowed self-service motor-spirit pumps since 2018, but C19 has moved the goalposts.  https://geo.maps.arcgis.com/apps/View/index.html?appid=fe6b92d4da52481483898a871928588c refers, and mightily confusing it is too.

Noo Joisey is still 100% attended service but I've only driven about ten miles there so didn’t need to fill up.
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Basil

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Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #809 on: August 30, 2020, 03:38:28 pm »
For the first time in five months, the church bells rang.  All six for a lovely half hour. Really missed them and I'm so glad they're back.
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Cudzoziemiec

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Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #810 on: September 07, 2020, 01:12:48 pm »
Olga Tokarczuk in the New Yorker has pointed out that wearing a facemask is the first time people have got to smell their own breath. She describes it as a very intimate moment, maybe even shocking.
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quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #811 on: September 07, 2020, 01:15:54 pm »
Olga Tokarczuk in the New Yorker has pointed out that wearing a facemask is the first time people have got to smell their own breath. She describes it as a very intimate moment, maybe even shocking.

Must admit that it has made me question what I eat before I get on a train...

J
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FifeingEejit

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Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #812 on: September 07, 2020, 01:59:14 pm »
Olga Tokarczuk in the New Yorker has pointed out that wearing a facemask is the first time people have got to smell their own breath. She describes it as a very intimate moment, maybe even shocking.
Not had this, it seems to just enhance my nasal congestion and pnd resulting in a coughing and snoting fit.

Not ideal in these times!
Does seem to get me all the space I could want though, hm...

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Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #813 on: Yesterday at 07:33:39 pm »
Rumours of bog roll, coffee, flour and pasta/rice stockpiling again, for fear of another national lockdown. Idiots.

What's odd though is that I haven't been able to find any Ground Cumin in any of my 3 local Sainsbury's (local, big, huge) for the last month or so.

Poor harvests and bad weather in supplying countries I guess.

(I realise that my first world problem might be related to major problems in those supplying countries.)
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Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #814 on: Yesterday at 08:51:45 pm »
What's odd though is that I haven't been able to find any Ground Cumin in any of my 3 local Sainsbury's (local, big, huge) for the last month or so.
We've had the same problem while away on holiday. A medium sized Co-op had some though.
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Mr Larrington

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Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #815 on: Yesterday at 09:10:06 pm »
Bought a 16-pack of bog roll last week, which should last at least until Easter :smug:
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PaulF

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Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #816 on: Today at 05:53:55 am »
Rumours of bog roll, coffee, flour and pasta/rice stockpiling again, for fear of another national lockdown. Idiots.

What's odd though is that I haven't been able to find any Ground Cumin in any of my 3 local Sainsbury's (local, big, huge) for the last month or so.

Poor harvests and bad weather in supplying countries I guess.

(I realise that my first world problem might be related to major problems in those supplying countries.)

We had the same “problem” and were wondering how widespread it was. Had to resort to grinding cumin seeds. Truly a FWP.

Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #817 on: Today at 08:18:02 am »
Rumours of bog roll, coffee, flour and pasta/rice stockpiling again, for fear of another national lockdown. Idiots.

Is this just another moral panic, with people adding another pack of loo roll and bag of pasta to their regular shops? Thought that was the major contributor to the shortages last time. 

Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #818 on: Today at 08:32:42 am »
Some people just don't get it.  They waddle out of the supermarket with two trolleys, one fullnof loo rolls, the other full of pasta, flour, hand sanitiser, etc., etc., etc.

I had the misfortune of having to pop into one such establishment briefly last week and in the half hour that I was there, twenty plus minutes of that in a checkout queue, the levels of panic buying was mind-boggling.

Guess it's time to pick up the extra bag of flour or pasta now on every visit.  🤔   Maybe not.  Stupid is as stupid does.