Author Topic: 'seasick Steve'  (Read 616 times)

Blodwyn Pig

  • what a nice chap
'seasick Steve'
« on: May 23, 2020, 06:28:26 pm »
Well, this is a first. went out on Grunhilda today for a very windy 45km, the wind was on my right for 1/3, behind for 1/3 and to my left  for a 1/3. 
My goodness 'bents are weird fellows with a side wind, as I found it felt wrong to lean into it, and with it being gusty, had me all over the sea..  A strange experience, but I admit, I was feeling a little odd this morning.  When I got home and came indoors, I was feeling rather ''quealy' ( Its another one of my made words, meaning a bit squiffy / nauseous / travel sick type thing). 

Now my question is, was I indeed feeling a bit 'quealy' or does riding a 'bent in a strong wind, upset the middle earth ear stability, hence a feeling of sea/motion sickness, and if so does one get used to it?

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: 'seasick Steve'
« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2020, 08:04:27 pm »
I reckon compared to a 700c upright the small front wheel gets caught less in a sidewind, so you don't get the same random steering inputs.  Meanwhile, you can't shift your bodyweight on a 'bent, so you've got to compensate for the force of the wind by leaning the bike into it, which you might not be used to.  Obviously that can get exciting when it's gusty, but in general I consider the Streetmachine to be pretty tolerant of wind.  (Sidewinds are one of those brick vs feather things, with lighter riders suffering more.  I suppose riding a PanzerFiets helps.)

I've had occasional bouts of terror with regard to steering in a straight line when it *really* mattered, and there was that BHPC race at Leicester last year where I expected the Baron (with disc wheels) to flip out from under me as I came about, but it's never made me seasick.

(For reference, on the odd occasion my middle ear's been playing up I've found that riding a bicycle - upright or recumbent - stops the dizziness for as long as I'm in motion.  With hilarious consequences when I come to a stop.  My theory is that on a bicycle your balance input is primarily via torque on the handlebars and vision, rather than the vestibular system.)
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Blodwyn Pig

  • what a nice chap
Re: 'seasick Steve'
« Reply #2 on: May 24, 2020, 10:38:15 am »
went out again today,  32km, not quite as windy, and I felt fine, must have been me I guess.

ElyDave

  • Royal and Ancient Polar Bear Society member 263583
Re: 'seasick Steve'
« Reply #3 on: May 24, 2020, 04:12:36 pm »
In my experinence, you get used to it.  The biggest effect of fighting a gusty crosswind on the Cruzbike is generally aching forearms the next day, perhaps becasue of the moving bottom bracket FWD config, with twin 700c wheels, which waggles the front end round a lot.  I can't comment on the USS config of course The inner ear doesn't suffer at all with me.

I have had the experience of riding along canted over like a dinghy, which can get a bit wearing on the neck after a while
“Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.” –Charles Dickens

Blodwyn Pig

  • what a nice chap
Re: 'seasick Steve'
« Reply #4 on: May 24, 2020, 07:07:22 pm »


I have had the experience of riding along canted over like a dinghy, which can get a bit wearing on the neck after a while

Yes I had that in Feb, riding along the exposed parts of the Tissington trail ,  in t'peak district, on a 'winter weekend 'YHA ruff stuff  tour' Riding along at about a 30 deg angle, into hurricane force winds, and driving rain, but that felt kind of natural, but to sit down and experience it is weird.  its a bit like .....I used to surf and windsurf years ago,and  you are standing 5-6 ft above the water and waves, but later I took up rowing,  with a coxed 4 ,on the Big open Thames,  and to be sitting down ,just below the water level,when a fecking big tanker goes by,is....scary shit.

Re: 'seasick Steve'
« Reply #5 on: May 26, 2020, 03:59:37 pm »
Never felt seasick or queasy on mine, not even that time I got blown into oncoming traffic. You just have to lean into the wind and that works the way you'd expect as long as you don't overthink it. Gusts can make things "interesting" though.

Re: 'seasick Steve'
« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2020, 04:39:03 pm »
It’s a none issue on a Lightning P-38. Think it was Storm Derek in Feb where I did a 200km audax and the side wind was a none issue.  On my more reclined Fuego it used to catch side winds. The main difference is possibly the seat as the p-38 has a mesh seat with barely any side profile. The Fuego seat is carbon fibre and has a side profile.