Author Topic: Is it the end of cash?  (Read 4434 times)

ian

  • feat. Undead Jess & Finestre, Queen of Hell
Re: Is it the end of cash?
« Reply #75 on: November 02, 2020, 03:37:32 pm »
Are tradespeople, taxi drivers and waiters who neglect to declare their cash income any different than the very wealthy who employ a long list of dodgy stratagems to reduce their tax liability? Personally I'm a good bit more offended by Donald Trump only paying US$750 in US income tax for a few years than I am by some waiter or taxi driver pocketing a few dollars in cash income. I'm pretty sure the UK has a few examples of similar behavior by the rich and powerful.

Certainly, but it's the same sort of morality involved. It ought to be evident in the middle of a pandemic how much we're dependent on government that's funded from taxation.
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Re: Is it the end of cash?
« Reply #76 on: November 02, 2020, 04:06:30 pm »
Anybody who evades taxes is a slimeball of the greatest order but I do find it a bit unfair that people always assume without evidence of any kind that a person receiving payment by cash must be a tax evader.  It is totally disingenuous and frankly people should be shamed for assuming as such.

Tax evaders exist at all levels of society and it is still all to easy to use more than one bank account and funnel a proportion of your income through an undeclared account.  I lost count of how many of my clients asked me what the price would be for cash and my reply was "Just the same.".   And, I always gave a receipt though of course they can be easy "lost" too.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Is it the end of cash?
« Reply #77 on: November 02, 2020, 04:46:33 pm »
It's why the London Taxi Drivers Network (or whatever it is) are so against card payments (and why the card machine, if present, is so often "temporarily out of order") or smart Taximeters that track journeys, print receipts and (most importantly) are auditable. The usual deflection tactic is to point to Uber (the corporation) and say that they don't pay enough/any corporation tax - conveniently ignoring the fact that the individual Uber drivers can't easily avoid paying tax as they don't receive cash for fares and everything they earn is easily auditable.
I guess that's why they introduced "fiscal registers" in taxis in Poland back in 2004. In that case, it was joining the EU that provided an excuse ("union VAT rules"). Card payments not necessary.
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Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Is it the end of cash?
« Reply #78 on: December 31, 2020, 01:13:24 pm »
Walked over the Clifton Suspension Bridge on Tuesday and noticed that it's now taking card payments only.
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Portaloos for Brexit

Re: Is it the end of cash?
« Reply #79 on: December 31, 2020, 04:15:08 pm »
Pubs and butty shops love cash and I prefer using cash in independent businesses because the card processing fees are a larger chunk of their profits. Always use card in chain stops, they can afford the hit.

Pre covid, I worked in central Birmingham and used to visit a lunchtime sandwich place regularly which was card-only.  The place was a tiny independent business with just one member of staff. Not having cash on the premises  made it a lot safer for the staff in a location between nice offices and less desirable inner city.

I've been missing their Portuguese custards and thinking about this now, I looked them up only to find out that they've permanently shut  :'(

Re: Is it the end of cash?
« Reply #80 on: December 31, 2020, 08:42:42 pm »
Found out my mobe has no NFC(Near Field Communication). So I can't use Google pay.
Sic transit and all that..

Re: Is it the end of cash?
« Reply #81 on: December 31, 2020, 08:49:11 pm »
Pre covid, I worked in central Birmingham and used to visit a lunchtime sandwich place regularly which was card-only.  The place was a tiny independent business with just one member of staff. Not having cash on the premises  made it a lot safer for the staff in a location between nice offices and less desirable inner city.


We have a gee-gaw gifts type shop who likewise prefer card payments.

I’ve hardly used cash since March, mainly using my phone to pay from my credit card.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

Re: Is it the end of cash?
« Reply #82 on: December 31, 2020, 09:12:42 pm »
Fruit and veg stall in our High St only takes cash, but takings are mostly relatively small sums so probably not economic to take cards.

The only other place I've needed cash is for the (council owned) supermarket car park machines, but they've just installed new machines that accept card payments.

ian

  • feat. Undead Jess & Finestre, Queen of Hell
Re: Is it the end of cash?
« Reply #83 on: January 01, 2021, 05:34:08 pm »
Pubs and butty shops love cash and I prefer using cash in independent businesses because the card processing fees are a larger chunk of their profits. Always use card in chain stops, they can afford the hit.

Pre covid, I worked in central Birmingham and used to visit a lunchtime sandwich place regularly which was card-only.  The place was a tiny independent business with just one member of staff. Not having cash on the premises  made it a lot safer for the staff in a location between nice offices and less desirable inner city.

I've been missing their Portuguese custards and thinking about this now, I looked them up only to find out that they've permanently shut  :'(

I'm often conscripted to man the doors and collect money from punters churning up for my wife's orchestra's gigs. Or I was, when such a thing was a thing. They all have little PoS terminals that plug into a phone. Fees are pretty minimal and there are no cash hassles or risk of having the cash box nicked because you've entrusted it to a conscripted halfwit.

I saw cash for the first time yesterday when the magic pub man opined the last two pints of dank beer from the bottom of the barrel that he'd bottled up for me might not be entirely drinkable, so he gave me £11.20 in cash back (he's not figured out card refunds yet) and wished me luck. I've not tried drinking it yet, but now it's free beer there's no way I can't not drink it.
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Re: Is it the end of cash?
« Reply #84 on: January 01, 2021, 06:28:24 pm »
Fruit and veg stall in our High St only takes cash, but takings are mostly relatively small sums so probably not economic to take cards.

The only other place I've needed cash is for the (council owned) supermarket car park machines, but they've just installed new machines that accept card payments.
Veg stall on our local market starting offering a card machine in lockdown#1. I sense reluctance though.

Re: Is it the end of cash?
« Reply #85 on: Today at 07:52:22 am »
News item on the interwebs today about tech issues affecting stores taking card payments recently.   How do you do business in a post cash tech appocalypse?

Re: Is it the end of cash?
« Reply #86 on: Today at 08:07:30 am »
During lockdown I have been able to purchase some building supplies.

The DIY centre accepts ordering online to reserve goods and allocates a time to collect and pay, card only.

I bought some wood and that was only possible by handing cash (cards not accepted) through the locked gate to the firm's cashier. The large goods (2.5 x 1.25 metre boards) were delivered an hour later.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Is it the end of cash?
« Reply #87 on: Today at 02:42:23 pm »
News item on the interwebs today about tech issues affecting stores taking card payments recently.   How do you do business in a post cash tech appocalypse?

Large shops closing during electricity/comms/computer outages because it's less hassle than the stock control system getting out of sync isn't really a new thing.  The smaller businesses who might have carried on for cash transactions with a pen and paper and some rusty mental arithmetic would be more affected.

Things could get very interesting if some prolonged catastrophe meant that cash was needed now people are getting out of the habit of holding any.  The core infrastructure's pretty reliable, but it wouldn't take much for everyone in a geographical area to lose access to it.  I'm thinking New York flooding sort of events.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Is it the end of cash?
« Reply #88 on: Today at 03:59:01 pm »
People used to say that every long-distance or off-road cyclist should hide a fiver (this was a long time ago) inside a bar end or the seat post, ICE taxi fares. And we've been reminded in the last year or so that some people recommend we all keep a fortnight's supply of basic foods at home. Perhaps there's an argument for keeping a similar cash stash somewhere (under the mattress? :D). Trouble is, a fortnight's supply of cash at 2021 prices is a) impracticably bulky b) a theft risk c) possibly attracting the attention of authorities (cf India and Russia large denomination note bans).
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Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Is it the end of cash?
« Reply #89 on: Today at 04:01:16 pm »
The problem (or possibly feature, depending how the shit hits the fan) with my emergency cash stash is that it's in Euros.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Is it the end of cash?
« Reply #90 on: Today at 04:06:04 pm »
USD is the traditional currency of last resort, at least before we get to gold bars, art works and the like. I would expect that to remain the case outside Europe. Within this continent, I guess it depends on whether the EU continues as a thing.
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Portaloos for Brexit

Re: Is it the end of cash?
« Reply #91 on: Today at 04:14:04 pm »
I may have a stash somewhere in the Bear-o-drome.  I regularly recycle the notes to avoid any issues with them going out of date but with these plastic ones it is probably not necessary.

Other than paying the utility bills we could probably survive for a few months if we could fight off the mutant hoardes.

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: Is it the end of cash?
« Reply #92 on: Today at 06:48:59 pm »
The only stash I ever had was in a place we borrowed for holidays. One time I was there I realised all the notes and the £1 coins were no longer in circulation  ;D
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ian

  • feat. Undead Jess & Finestre, Queen of Hell
Re: Is it the end of cash?
« Reply #93 on: Today at 08:36:55 pm »
We have a pile of cash stashed in a drawer in the kitchen, mostly pounds and dollars, plus random travel currency that never got changed back because it's probably worth 35p. I should probably check that any of it is still legal currency. When I travelled a lot, especially in places like Africa, I'd always take a stash of dollars.
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