Author Topic: Colour vision  (Read 1318 times)

Re: Colour vision
« Reply #25 on: August 25, 2020, 05:57:10 pm »
Yes, a shade of green, whereas ao and midori are, AIUI, separate colours. If you say something's emerald and I say it's jade, we can argue over this but both agree it's green of some sort. Whereas if something's ao, it can't be midori. AIUI...

But artichoke can’t be Emerald even though both shades of green 😁

Re: Colour vision
« Reply #26 on: August 25, 2020, 06:14:32 pm »
Bi-colour[1] LEDs are a work of Stan.
[1] Two LEDs in one housing, giving three possible colours, depending on which are switched on.
I came across a bi-directional LED with two red LEDs in one housing. However the purpose was to allow it to illuminate with either direction of current, and the difference wasn't supposed to be noticable, so it's probably going to be allowed into Kim's box of electronic bits.

I noticed the slight change in illumination angle between the two LEDs.
Quote from: Kim
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FifeingEejit

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Re: Colour vision
« Reply #27 on: August 25, 2020, 06:55:27 pm »
Few younger people, of course, realise that the world was monochrome till 1973 when they first debuted beige, the first ever colour (at the time a lot people thought that colours wouldn't catch on) but it took the early 70s by storm. It was so popular that they followed it with orange in 1975 and red a year later. An experimental blue was first sighted in the wild in 1982, though quite a few people believe that was an inadvertent release from the labs. The precise debut of green is still debated even today. Of course, once released, colours rapidly started to breed.

Beige?
This was sold as Gold

Re: Colour vision
« Reply #28 on: August 25, 2020, 07:47:31 pm »
Assuming there's anyone on the internet who isn't familiar with The Dress, it's worth checking out. It reveals a lot about how we model colour perception.

Colour is very complicated. Colours themselves can be pigmental (i.e a pigment that absorbs and reflects certain frequencies) or structural* (a physical refraction or diffraction of incident light). The two can interact (so stripy things can be perceived as different colours). It'll all depend on that incident light (which is why things are different colours under sodium lamps). The receptor pigments in your eyes have varying frequency responses curves.

*this explains blue/green/grey eyes. Humans, and all mammals, only have two** pigments – black-brown eumelanin and red-brown pheomelanin. There's no actual blue in blue eyes.

**slight lie, we have another, near-black neuromelanin, which as the name suggests is present in the brain, hence the substantia nigra.


Me. I'd never heard of that pic.  On my screen it's clearly a photo showing a gold/white dress.  That's twice removed from reality since it a camera image shown on a VDU.   

And I know I am not colour blind because I used to work for the railways.
Sic transit and all that..

ian

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Re: Colour vision
« Reply #29 on: August 25, 2020, 09:04:55 pm »
It's a blue and black dress. The point is that it's a photo, if you saw the dress in person, it would be blue and black but robbed of contextual information in the photo, your brain fills in the contextual gaps with assumptions, so a lot of people see a white and gold dress.
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Re: Colour vision
« Reply #30 on: August 25, 2020, 09:39:04 pm »
It's a blue and black dress. The point is that it's a photo, if you saw the dress in person, it would be blue and black but robbed of contextual information in the photo, your brain fills in the contextual gaps with assumptions, so a lot of people see a white and gold dress.

Yes, I noted it was removed from reality.  As are too many of my own photos.   
Sic transit and all that..

hellymedic

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Re: Colour vision
« Reply #31 on: August 26, 2020, 02:52:31 am »
My colour vision (well really just my right eye now, post optic neuritis) is pretty good, though my Dad is red-green colour blind.

I get the feeling that for ME colours have an instant emotional effect - a slightly orange yellow is happy and sunny, red stands out anywhere, pale blue is cool. I probably notice colour before I notice other aspects of things. I suspect other women may be similar.

Desaturated colours are calmer and duller.

I appreciate others perceive differently.