Author Topic: Time ATAC pedals  (Read 662 times)

IJL

Time ATAC pedals
« on: September 21, 2020, 11:47:26 am »
I've used Time ATAC's for years, initially just off road but for a few years on my road bike as well
MTB pedals and cleats are much better for the common combination of tired/audax/wet/ cafe/shop with tiled floor
They do everything a pedal should and I have no issues apart from the fact hat they seem to chew up the sole of my shoes, this is mainly on the rubber bits either side of the actual cleat
eventually this leads to a bit of instability between shoe and pedal.
Do all MTB type pedals do this? or are some worse than others?  I'm not keen to change pedal and find i have the same issue

fuaran

  • rothair gasta
Re: Time ATAC pedals
« Reply #1 on: September 21, 2020, 02:28:00 pm »

Re: Time ATAC pedals
« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2020, 02:38:00 pm »
Could try some Crank Brothers Shoe Shields? https://www.chainreactioncycles.com/crankbrothers-shoe-shields/rp-prod25138

Those protect the sole in front and behind the cleat, not either side.

I suspect the answer to the OP is to try SPD pedals and cleats.  Whilst I sometimes have to cut away a small amount of surrounding tread to get sufficient clearance, I don't see any additional ongoing wear to the tread other than the normal from walking.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

fuaran

  • rothair gasta
Re: Time ATAC pedals
« Reply #3 on: September 21, 2020, 03:06:44 pm »
Could make a DIY version of those shoe shields, cut them to match your shoes? Though depends on the shoes, and where it is actually wearing out.

Or try some pedals with larger platform. Could give more support, so less movement.

Re: Time ATAC pedals
« Reply #4 on: September 21, 2020, 03:26:55 pm »
I've been using ATAC for 20 years or more and find no problem.  Perhaps it depends on exactly what design of pedal and shoe is used.
Pedals I use are the old old old design that uses proper ball and roller bearings not plain bearings  - these are first and second generation which just about get into this century.  The modernish design, probably the last 15 years, is a bit different and perhaps leaves the sides of the shoe not so well supported.  I have noticed that the sides of the cut-outs in the soles of my Exustar shoes are worn, but these shoes are at least 7 years old  and I put that down to general wear.  My Giro Republic shoes show no wear anywhere around the cleats - different sole design and about 4 years old

I think the answer to the question is - "no, I have not noticed any wear I can attribute to pedal or cleat design".  Perhaps a photo of the issue you have described would help.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Time ATAC pedals
« Reply #5 on: September 21, 2020, 07:38:40 pm »
eventually this leads to a bit of instability between shoe and pedal.
Do all MTB type pedals do this? or are some worse than others?  I'm not keen to change pedal and find i have the same issue

FWIW I've just experimentally switched to ATAC in the hope that it'll prevent the clicking due to wear of the pedal surface that you get with SPDs if you don't maintain positive pressure throughout the pedal stroke.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Time ATAC pedals
« Reply #6 on: September 22, 2020, 09:54:52 am »
I'm another dedicated ATAC rider (20+ years) and have never found this problem either - with any of the model of pedal usedover this period. It may be an issue with your shoes - I generally use Sidis if that's any help. I always assumed that wear of the soles is largely due to walking, and never seen anything to contraindicate this.

The only issue I have noticed with them is that the springs eventually break on one side. The pedals are still quite usable with a broken spring, but the cleat is not held as firmly and can lead to excess foot movement. Apart from that (which is generally after a lot of use) I find them the ideal pedal.

IJL

Re: Time ATAC pedals
« Reply #7 on: September 23, 2020, 09:37:24 am »
Thanks for the info, its been an issue on several pairs of shoes and different ATAC pedals over at least the last 15 years.
If its not generally a problem perhaps its to do with my foot position etc
I mentioned it in a bike shop and was told its an issue with Time and Eggbeaters but he was talking about cyclocross whereas my riding is almost all on the road.
The link is a picture of one of the shoes


https://photos.app.goo.gl/b6m2WfCSjA3URy4b6

Re: Time ATAC pedals
« Reply #8 on: September 23, 2020, 01:28:58 pm »
I've been using Time Atac pedals for many years. I like them. I do notice some wear on the left
cleat, but that is down to my body mechanics.


Left foot from two different brands.
left (newer): Sidi, on the right (lolder): Louis Garneau
https://forum.cyclinguk.org/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=136786&p=1470426&hilit=atac#p1470426

Image

zigzag

  • unfuckwithable
Re: Time ATAC pedals
« Reply #9 on: September 23, 2020, 01:49:31 pm »
i've been using them on a commuter bike many years ago, they work fine when new, but my problem was that pedal springs wear two grooves (in the front and the back of a cleat) in the sole of the shoes and the whole interface becomes wobbly. i've tried installing crackbrothers shields, however they don't work, unless they are epoxied to the sole (which i didn't want to do).

Re: Time ATAC pedals
« Reply #10 on: October 10, 2020, 08:33:35 pm »
Began using Time pedals and cleats even before they attained the “ATAC” branding. (Probably now considered vintage, and were at that stage single sided and took the design from the race versions although my first pair are now in the spares box. Still good with smooth bearings after all this time)

The pedals have changed slightly in design a few times but they are now installed on all my cycles including a Brompton! Originally Time produced a shoe too, but now I mainly use Sidi cross shoes as they provide protection to the cleat and allow normal walking. Good solid carbon sole too.

After many thousands of miles I wouldn’t use anything else. Never had a problem or springs break. Cleats do eventually wear but that is just use and are replaceable. (Keep the allen key bolts clean and threads lubed so you can get them out and swapped).

Titan(ium) axled ones being top notch.

Undoubtedly IMHO the best.