Author Topic: Pork chops in cider  (Read 532 times)

quixoticgeek

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Pork chops in cider
« on: October 09, 2020, 03:22:09 pm »

I have a recipe that I've made a few times for Pork chops in a cider sauce, which has gone down well and I like[1]

But it requires messing about with a frying pan and standing at the stove to cook. I was wondering if I could find a suitable alternative as a one pot, throw it in the oven type affair. I came across this recipe, that looked really simple and easy:

https://www.rachaelraymag.com/recipe/one-pot-pork-with-apple-cider-potatoes

Unfortunately, I had a lot of issues with the potatoes being too al denté, and the pork chops burning.

I'm wondering what I could do differently, to make the single pan version. Before I give up and go back to making it with the usual recipe, and the associated extra time/washing up.

J

[1] This one: https://www.redbookmag.com/food-recipes/recipes/a31959/pork-chops-cider-sauce-recipe-rbk1210/
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fboab

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Re: Pork chops in cider
« Reply #1 on: October 09, 2020, 03:42:46 pm »
The single pot version relies on slivers of potato, correct layering and the right sized 'dutch oven'1. It's a knife edge balance between enough liquid to cook the potatoes before it evaporates and baking, not poaching, the pork.

I'd put up with the washing up.
Apart from anything else, if you're going to do hot-pot esque potatoes I'd want them slightly crispy and slathered in butter, somewhere between tartiflette and Lancashire Hot Pot. You'll always struggle to get a decent sauce if you throw everything in together.




1: Bloody Americans. It's a cast iron casserole dish.
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Re: Pork chops in cider
« Reply #2 on: October 09, 2020, 03:57:45 pm »
The other option is to brown the meat in the casserole, and then braise or casserole it entire; will give a softer texture to the pork, but it shouldn't burn before the veg cooks.

Re: Pork chops in cider
« Reply #3 on: October 09, 2020, 04:24:09 pm »
The alternative is to have a less fussy recipe. Here's mine.

For two chops

Chop up equal quantities of shallot and peeled apple, desert apples work best. One apple and a couple of large shallots works well.

Start cooking in a mix of butter and olive and throw in the chops. If you want to colour the chops, brown them first. You do not want to burn the shallot/apple, but you do want to caremelise, that is a fine line, so a lower rather than a higher heat to cook but you are still frying.

Once that's done, sloosh in the cider. Once the alcohol has evaporated, lob in a good spoon of creme fraiche and put the chops back in if you have had to take them out. Mustard is optional, wholegrain works too.  I normally serve with plain boiled rice.

Gattopardo

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Re: Pork chops in cider
« Reply #4 on: October 09, 2020, 07:09:39 pm »
The single pot version relies on slivers of potato, correct layering and the right sized 'dutch oven'1. It's a knife edge balance between enough liquid to cook the potatoes before it evaporates and baking, not poaching, the pork.

I'd put up with the washing up.
Apart from anything else, if you're going to do hot-pot esque potatoes I'd want them slightly crispy and slathered in butter, somewhere between tartiflette and Lancashire Hot Pot. You'll always struggle to get a decent sauce if you throw everything in together.




1: Bloody Americans. It's a cast iron casserole dish.

Wouldn't lard roasted potatoes complement the pork rather than the butter?

Stupid question is sweet or dry cider better? 

I have made pork chops in cider (cheapest) by frying/braising the pork chops in a pan then adding grated onions and gratted cooking apples once the cider has cooked off.  Along with oven cooked crunchy root veg.   

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Pork chops in cider
« Reply #5 on: October 24, 2020, 03:15:07 pm »
The single pot version relies on slivers of potato, correct layering and the right sized 'dutch oven'1. It's a knife edge balance between enough liquid to cook the potatoes before it evaporates and baking, not poaching, the pork.

I'd put up with the washing up.
Apart from anything else, if you're going to do hot-pot esque potatoes I'd want them slightly crispy and slathered in butter, somewhere between tartiflette and Lancashire Hot Pot. You'll always struggle to get a decent sauce if you throw everything in together.

1: Bloody Americans. It's a cast iron casserole dish.

You're right. I made my usual version yesterday. It may have required an oven dish, steamer, small saucepan, and the frying pan to make, but it was so so so worth it. Most delicious!

J
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