Author Topic: blood disorder  (Read 655 times)

blood disorder
« on: October 09, 2020, 04:45:32 pm »
at end of june my GP informed me that my red blood cells were oversize and doughnut shaped, without the hole in the middle
I was advised to stop consuming alcohol and to see her again in three months.
this came about during investigation into shortage of breath and being unable to walk more than a few yards before my legs gave out.
 felt like lactic acid build up after racing out the saddle up a long steep hill
Anyone suffered similar or know what it is ??
3 months with no alcohol has made not a jot of difference to breathless  or legs
she also discovered the lower heart muscle was large/thickened.
also waiting for a AAA scan, but covid seems to have put that on the back burner
apart from that, diabetes and colitis, the latter since I was 21 I`m alright Jack ;D
And looking forward to an ICE trike delivery the first week in November when I shall be 76 at the end of the month

Re: blood disorder
« Reply #1 on: October 09, 2020, 05:50:00 pm »
(I am not a doctor!)

Megaloblastic Anemia?

Folate and B12 deficiencies are both linked...

"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Re: blood disorder
« Reply #2 on: October 09, 2020, 07:50:15 pm »
i am a doctor but not in this field at all!

large red cells with no doughnut sounds like megaloblastic anaemia.  I presume she has done blood tests but also you have no idea what has been done :)
You have a history of colitis and you are 76 both of which will reduce B12 absorption and possibly folate.  If you have not had B12 blood test then should probably ask about it.

Do you have any slight unsteadiness on your feet or slight loss of dexterity recently as they are also signs of B12 deficiency.

After that I run out of ideas

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: blood disorder
« Reply #3 on: October 09, 2020, 08:39:21 pm »
(I am not a doctor!)

Megaloblastic Anemia?

Folate and B12 deficiencies are both linked...

Certainly looks like a macrocytic anaemia, which could be due to B12 or folate deficiency.

Levels should be checked and supplements prescribed as needed.

Colitis can cause trouble with B12 absorption.

Re: blood disorder
« Reply #4 on: October 09, 2020, 09:23:49 pm »
thanks for the info people
shall now go trawling in the sea of google
see what I might be up against

had to have iron infusion a couple of years ago . initiated by my GI nurse
thanks to covid my appoink ments keep getting pushed back

ian

  • feat. Undead Jess & Finestre, Queen of Hell
Re: blood disorder
« Reply #5 on: October 09, 2020, 09:35:50 pm »
Go back to your doctor. It's simply not adequate in 2020 that they don't explain their diagnosis and the treatment options.

Then second-guess them on Google. But remember, you can catch anything off the internet. I currently have six rare syndromes. And my surgery never invites me to visit.
Support the Great Surrey Bear Census 2020

Re: blood disorder
« Reply #6 on: October 09, 2020, 09:48:37 pm »
just had a look on the Googlies page
now I know what she will be talking about on the phone on Monday am
Looks like a Tony Hancock arm some time next week, as going to ask for Diabetes+colitis+this thing bloods to be done all at same time. The first 2 are due anyway....more gain .... less pain ;D
Probably some/most will be the same

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: blood disorder
« Reply #7 on: October 09, 2020, 09:51:38 pm »
Iron etc, B12 & Folate assays don't need an armful and can mostly be done on tubes used for other tests.

Gattopardo

  • Lord of the sith
  • Overseaing the building of the death star
Re: blood disorder
« Reply #8 on: October 09, 2020, 10:36:15 pm »
i am a doctor but not in this field at all!

large red cells with no doughnut sounds like megaloblastic anaemia.  I presume she has done blood tests but also you have no idea what has been done :)
You have a history of colitis and you are 76 both of which will reduce B12 absorption and possibly folate.  If you have not had B12 blood test then should probably ask about it.

Do you have any slight unsteadiness on your feet or slight loss of dexterity recently as they are also signs of B12 deficiency.

After that I run out of ideas

Is it you Dr Phil redmond ;D

Re: blood disorder
« Reply #9 on: October 10, 2020, 07:30:09 am »
just had a look on the Googlies page
now I know what she will be talking about on the phone on Monday am
Looks like a Tony Hancock arm some time next week, as going to ask for Diabetes+colitis+this thing bloods to be done all at same time. The first 2 are due anyway....more gain .... less pain ;D
Probably some/most will be the same
You mention diabetes. Are you type 2 on metforin? That is a potent inhibitor of B12 absorption as are omeprazole or lanzoprazole.

T42

  • Old fool in a hurry
Re: blood disorder
« Reply #10 on: October 10, 2020, 08:38:24 am »
You mention diabetes. Are you type 2 on metformin? That is a potent inhibitor of B12 absorption as are omeprazole or lanzoprazole.

That's interesting, since I'm on both - well, I am if by the *azoles you mean PPIs in general. Looking back through my analyses, my doc hasn't called for a hematogram for a couple of years.  OTOH I do eat plenty of meat and I haven't any of the symptoms Phillip describes.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

MikeFromLFE

  • Previously known as Millimole
Re: blood disorder
« Reply #11 on: October 10, 2020, 12:06:37 pm »
Iron etc, B12 & Folate assays don't need an armful and can mostly be done on tubes used for other tests.
When I started in Pathology in the early 1970s we'd take 20ml of blood just for the Iron (& TIBC), plus more for other tests, taking 50ml of blood in one go wasn't uncommon.
One of the unheralded advances in Biomedical science is the dramatic reduction in the amount of blood taken for a huge range of tests. Taking more than 15ml is very uncommon although using vacuum type bottles changes the process considerably.
These smaller amounts - which are still overkill - mean that paediatric testing is a reality, as well as reducing the pain and fear of phlebotomy.

Be very careful of Doctor Google - you can go down very dark rabbit holes.
At one point Dr G was convinced I had liver cancer, which was obviously (to me with a little knowledge) nonsense, but could have scared the bejesus out of another less well informed.
Too many angry people - breathe & relax.

barakta

  • Bastard lovechild of Yomiko Readman and Johnny 5
Re: blood disorder
« Reply #12 on: October 10, 2020, 01:41:39 pm »
I am v grateful for the reduction in blood needed even over the last few years. It means the technique of "get competent trustworthy vampire who can extract blood directly with a needle and syringe" gets enough blood out before my medical-trauma reaction vein collapse kicks in and I get 24-48hrs of feeling shocky and shit. Previously we'd get zero or maybe 5ml at best.

Anaesthetists are surprisingly nice to me considering I break all their rules and don't let them stab me while conscious.

Re: blood disorder
« Reply #13 on: October 13, 2020, 03:49:53 pm »
GP rang on monday. very pleased at zilch alcohol, said it brought a smile to her face. can`t say I was smiling :-X
Had bloods taken today, and she has brought forward diabetic review
It appears that Metformin and Omeprozole are at the top of the list for causing my problem, after a trawl thru the web
taking 2 x 500mg daily and 20mg Omeprozole, so will have a word or 3 dozen about that
should hear from her by end of week, if shes not on holiday..... again
aaaah well, flu` jab 2morra