Author Topic: How would you box in this water heater/boiler?  (Read 1750 times)

Re: How would you box in this water heater/boiler?
« Reply #25 on: October 29, 2020, 08:38:05 pm »
Magnets are another method for holding a cover over things like this. I boxed in some pipework in our bathroom cupboard but left a hatch to get at the stop cocks and the hatch is held on by a magnet in each corner. Just recess a hole in a bit of wood for one magnet and recess the cover for the other. No screw holes to fill :)
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: How would you box in this water heater/boiler?
« Reply #26 on: October 29, 2020, 10:08:01 pm »
Magnets are another method for holding a cover over things like this. I boxed in some pipework in our bathroom cupboard but left a hatch to get at the stop cocks and the hatch is held on by a magnet in each corner. Just recess a hole in a bit of wood for one magnet and recess the cover for the other. No screw holes to fill :)

 :thumbsup:

I have a Mk 1 bit of wood drilled for hanging test leads, multimeter probes and the like, which people who own houses would be able to screw to a convenient wall.  I recessed magnets in it so it can stick to the front of our server rack (and be easily removed and draped out of the way when non-trivial access is required to the equipment within).  Works well.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

robgul

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Re: How would you box in this water heater/boiler?
« Reply #27 on: October 29, 2020, 10:12:19 pm »
Magnets are another method for holding a cover over things like this. I boxed in some pipework in our bathroom cupboard but left a hatch to get at the stop cocks and the hatch is held on by a magnet in each corner. Just recess a hole in a bit of wood for one magnet and recess the cover for the other. No screw holes to fill :)

Agreed - I have a couple of magnet applications for stuff in my workshop . . . and for some thin oak trim around a panel in the downstairs loo it's fitted with velcro! (not by me I would add)
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nicknack

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Re: How would you box in this water heater/boiler?
« Reply #28 on: October 30, 2020, 05:46:36 pm »
Boxing in pipes? That reminds me...
The bathroom always seemed to be a bit damp. It wasn't until we decided to have the floor renewed we discovered why. When the chap doing the flooring removed the old floor he discovered a shower tray underneath that was full of water. The water came from a continuously leaking pipe that had been boxed in behind the loo.
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Mrs Pingu

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Re: How would you box in this water heater/boiler?
« Reply #29 on: October 30, 2020, 05:50:19 pm »
Boxing in pipes? That reminds me...
The bathroom always seemed to be a bit damp. It wasn't until we decided to have the floor renewed we discovered why. When the chap doing the flooring removed the old floor he discovered a shower tray underneath that was full of water. The water came from a continuously leaking pipe that had been boxed in behind the loo.
So rather than unbox the pipe and fix it some bodger decided to put a shower tray under the floor??
The mind boggles.  ??? :facepalm:
Do not clench. It only makes it worse.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: How would you box in this water heater/boiler?
« Reply #30 on: October 30, 2020, 08:53:00 pm »
Putting a tray with a moisture sensor to catch drips under your bath/shower seems eminently sensible, but that's Groverhaus territory.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

nicknack

  • Hornblower
Re: How would you box in this water heater/boiler?
« Reply #31 on: October 31, 2020, 09:30:04 am »
Boxing in pipes? That reminds me...
The bathroom always seemed to be a bit damp. It wasn't until we decided to have the floor renewed we discovered why. When the chap doing the flooring removed the old floor he discovered a shower tray underneath that was full of water. The water came from a continuously leaking pipe that had been boxed in behind the loo.
So rather than unbox the pipe and fix it some bodger decided to put a shower tray under the floor??
The mind boggles.  ??? :facepalm:
We have no idea of the sequence of events that lead to this, but it wasn't the only example of spectacularly crap bodging we found. The best one being the waste pipe from the utility room (from the washing machine mostly). It went through the wall then down at an angle of 45 degrees against the wall to disappear through a hole in the slabs. First time we ran the washing machine it flooded the yard. Lifting the slab uncovered solid London Clay - no drain at all, just a hole in the slab. More slab lifting uncovered a proper drain directly below the outlet through the wall. So why drill a hole in a slab that goes nowhere when there's a perfectly fine connection even nearer? Bonkers.
There's no vibrations, but wait.

Mrs Pingu

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Re: How would you box in this water heater/boiler?
« Reply #32 on: November 01, 2020, 03:52:31 pm »
Very odd.
Do not clench. It only makes it worse.

Re: How would you box in this water heater/boiler?
« Reply #33 on: November 01, 2020, 04:11:10 pm »
Boxing in pipes? That reminds me...
The bathroom always seemed to be a bit damp. It wasn't until we decided to have the floor renewed we discovered why. When the chap doing the flooring removed the old floor he discovered a shower tray underneath that was full of water. The water came from a continuously leaking pipe that had been boxed in behind the loo.
So rather than unbox the pipe and fix it some bodger decided to put a shower tray under the floor??
The mind boggles.  ??? :facepalm:
We have no idea of the sequence of events that lead to this, but it wasn't the only example of spectacularly crap bodging we found. The best one being the waste pipe from the utility room (from the washing machine mostly). It went through the wall then down at an angle of 45 degrees against the wall to disappear through a hole in the slabs. First time we ran the washing machine it flooded the yard. Lifting the slab uncovered solid London Clay - no drain at all, just a hole in the slab. More slab lifting uncovered a proper drain directly below the outlet through the wall. So why drill a hole in a slab that goes nowhere when there's a perfectly fine connection even nearer? Bonkers.

Going by my experience with DIY in my house, it sounds very much like a previous home-owner at your place was a builder.  ;)
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