Author Topic: Stopping your bike getting nicked  (Read 2632 times)

ian

  • feat. Undead Jess & Finestre, Queen of Hell
Re: Stopping your bike getting nicked
« Reply #50 on: October 28, 2020, 09:22:53 am »
How about removable pedals like MKS, would thieves notice the lack of pedals before they nicked it?
Once parts are missing from a bike the vultures start circling.

Indeed, you've essentially made a declaration of spare parts. Same for removing a seat. You'll come back to find a locked frame and a sad coil of oily chain.
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citoyen

  • Occasionally rides a bike
Re: Stopping your bike getting nicked
« Reply #51 on: October 28, 2020, 09:28:24 am »
A friend had his brakeless track bike stolen and found it abandoned a short distance away, which he attributes to the thief being unable to ride it.

I vaguely recall reading a story somewhere (LFGSS?) about a courier leaving his brakeless track bike unattended while dropping off a package. Came back out to see a scrote trying to ride it away and falling off, injuring himself quite badly. Or maybe the scrote was already lying injured on the roadside, the bike on the ground next to him.
"The future's all yours, you lousy bicycles."

arabella

  • no se porque yo no lo se
Re: Stopping your bike getting nicked
« Reply #52 on: October 28, 2020, 04:00:13 pm »
Didn't work when my fixie was nicked (& it was fairly rusty), it stayed nicked.
fixed gear
only a front brake (aka street legal)
 :'(
In the dark, all views are the same.

ian

  • feat. Undead Jess & Finestre, Queen of Hell
Re: Stopping your bike getting nicked
« Reply #53 on: October 28, 2020, 04:10:06 pm »
Quite often they simply cut or grind off the locks and chuck them in a van. They're not riding them.
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Re: Stopping your bike getting nicked
« Reply #54 on: October 28, 2020, 05:09:44 pm »
Didn't work when my fixie was nicked (& it was fairly rusty), it stayed nicked.
fixed gear
only a front brake (aka street legal)
 :'(

Yeah, fixed is pretty normal nowadays, but in the 80s was very rarely seen outside of the track and a few niche riders.
Quote from: tiermat
that's not science, it's semantics.

Pingu

  • Put away those fiery biscuits!
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    • the Igloo
Re: Stopping your bike getting nicked
« Reply #55 on: October 28, 2020, 05:29:58 pm »
Didn't work when my fixie was nicked (& it was fairly rusty), it stayed nicked.
fixed gear
only a front brake (aka street legal)
 :'(

Yeah, fixed is pretty normal nowadays, but in the 80s was very rarely seen outside of the track and a few niche riders.

Before hipsters* were invented.




*Not the clothing  ::-)

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Stopping your bike getting nicked
« Reply #56 on: October 28, 2020, 06:04:57 pm »
Ah yes, the good old days when bikes had lollipops and trousers came all the way up to your waist.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Stopping your bike getting nicked
« Reply #57 on: October 28, 2020, 06:09:50 pm »
Ah yes, the good old days when bikes had lollipops and trousers came all the way up to your you had a waist.
FTFY
Let's go for a ride to the Old Sawmill, Valentina, Buzz and you.

Re: Stopping your bike getting nicked
« Reply #58 on: October 28, 2020, 08:10:24 pm »
Didn't work when my fixie was nicked (& it was fairly rusty), it stayed nicked.
fixed gear
only a front brake (aka street legal)
 :'(

Yeah, fixed is pretty normal nowadays, but in the 80s was very rarely seen outside of the track and a few niche riders.

Youngster! Many of us rode fixed gear winter bikes in the 60s into the 70s.

Morat

  • I tried to HTFU but something went ping :(
Re: Stopping your bike getting nicked
« Reply #59 on: October 29, 2020, 11:48:47 am »
I was thinking about purchasing a Tracker and installing it inside the frame via the B/B.  Surprised it hasnt been mentioned (yet). Has anyone tried one?
Nope. I think that business model suffers from the "It won't happen to me" effect.

I had one about 20 years ago, but it didn't stop my bike being stolen or aid in its recovery. £70 wasted IMO.
Tandem Stoker, CX bike abuser (slicks and tarmac) and owner of a sadly neglected MTB.

Re: Stopping your bike getting nicked
« Reply #60 on: October 29, 2020, 02:44:48 pm »
Anyone tried the bike alarms, which go off when the bike is moved, and/or send a text message?

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Stopping your bike getting nicked
« Reply #61 on: October 29, 2020, 04:29:41 pm »
Feline has or had one.
Let's go for a ride to the Old Sawmill, Valentina, Buzz and you.

Re: Stopping your bike getting nicked
« Reply #62 on: October 29, 2020, 09:34:29 pm »
If I had somewhere for the resulting luggage, I’d swap my saddle when parked for a nice spongy one.
Saturated with chilli oil.
Maybe with added fish hooks.
Could work on either the opportunist or as a deterrent to buying stolen bikes.

I do have a (not the flimsiest) cable lock as my second on the two tools basis. I’m suspicious of the lockless cable on a D lock approach, as the cable adds nothing once the D is broken.

My only other suggestion is the card access store or on-platform racks at the station. There’s some tailgating, but coupled with cctv has to be a riskier proposition for the thief than other racks. Worked for my commuter, but not so convenient most of the time.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Stopping your bike getting nicked
« Reply #63 on: October 29, 2020, 10:01:29 pm »
I do have a (not the flimsiest) cable lock as my second on the two tools basis. I’m suspicious of the lockless cable on a D lock approach, as the cable adds nothing once the D is broken.

I do this when popping to the shops, as it's low-risk, quick and easy.  I consider it primarily a measure to prevent the bike falling over, rather than providing additional security, but I do have security skewers on the wheels.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

fruitcake

  • some kind of fruitcake
    • Bailey
Re: Stopping your bike getting nicked
« Reply #64 on: November 09, 2020, 09:43:28 am »
I think there's a lot to be said for uglifying a bike, to make it hard (for a thief) to sell. Those 'rust' stickers are a great idea. I've heard of people pinkinfying a bike. I'd like to try creating a rust-effect paint finish. Other uglification methods are available.

If you don't want to uglify your favourite bike, you could keep a Station Bike: inexpensive, terrible looking and just good enough to get you to and from the train station (or other bike theft hotspot).

Karla

  • car(e) free
    • Lost Byway - around the world by bike
Re: Stopping your bike getting nicked
« Reply #65 on: November 09, 2020, 11:20:55 am »
A friend had his brakeless track bike stolen and found it abandoned a short distance away, which he attributes to the thief being unable to ride it.

I vaguely recall reading a story somewhere (LFGSS?) about a courier leaving his brakeless track bike unattended while dropping off a package. Came back out to see a scrote trying to ride it away and falling off, injuring himself quite badly. Or maybe the scrote was already lying injured on the roadside, the bike on the ground next to him.

The first time my Pompino was nicked I found it in a shop a week later.  Apparently the mechanic was at that moment in hospital due to a finger - fixed chainring mashup.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Stopping your bike getting nicked
« Reply #66 on: November 10, 2020, 01:32:06 pm »
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-54695188
Detectives and noxious locks take on bike thieves
Let's go for a ride to the Old Sawmill, Valentina, Buzz and you.

Re: Stopping your bike getting nicked
« Reply #67 on: November 10, 2020, 01:53:01 pm »
Yeah, fixed is pretty normal nowadays, but in the 80s was very rarely seen outside of the track and a few niche riders.
Youngster! Many of us rode fixed gear winter bikes in the 60s into the 70s.
Yes, but we were part of a minority of club cyclists, and we weren't stealing each others' bikes. There was a time when you felt that you had a decent chance that a fixed-wheel bike would catch out any thief who might try to ride off on it.

Re: Stopping your bike getting nicked
« Reply #68 on: November 17, 2020, 10:21:55 am »
I think there's a lot to be said for uglifying a bike, to make it hard (for a thief) to sell. Those 'rust' stickers are a great idea. I've heard of people pinkinfying a bike. I'd like to try creating a rust-effect paint finish. Other uglification methods are available.

If you don't want to uglify your favourite bike, you could keep a Station Bike: inexpensive, terrible looking and just good enough to get you to and from the train station (or other bike theft hotspot).

Just bought some of those 'rust & scratch stickers' to try as an additional measure - on an about town bike.   :)

Destroying rainforest for economic gain is like burning a Renaissance painting to cook a meal.  EOW.