Author Topic: Karcher window vac  (Read 574 times)

Mrs Pingu

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Karcher window vac
« on: November 09, 2020, 07:41:22 pm »
Anyone got one? Wondering if it would be useful for sucking up the water that tends to dribble slowly out of the shower enclosure frame which at the drain end builds up on the edge of the tray and makes the sealant mouldy.
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Pedal Castro

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Re: Karcher window vac
« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2020, 09:19:32 pm »
Possibly, if it's a flat surface. It certainly sucks up water from a window.

hellymedic

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Re: Karcher window vac
« Reply #2 on: November 09, 2020, 10:36:28 pm »
We don't have a window vac.
We have an electric brush floor sweeper that stopped working after about 5 years.
Kärcher's national HQ is about 3 miles from here, so D took it there and paid ?£30 upfront for service on 7 September.
We are still waiting for this to be fixed.
I've phoned them twice.
Just saying...

robgul

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Re: Karcher window vac
« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2020, 07:50:05 am »
From the Karcher window thing that a former neighbour had, I doubt it would work  BUT  is the question really one of prevention rather than cure???

... but for all that we have a shower head that drips slowly  . . it's on a hose so I just put the head on the floor of the shower after use.   It's a "round tuit" task made over-complicated by the plumbing stuff being built into the wall.
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Re: Karcher window vac
« Reply #4 on: November 10, 2020, 08:03:24 am »
We have one. It's excellent on glass, much better than I thought it would be. Battery (this is the lithium battery one) lasts forever. It's less good at the glass / frame junction - only good when the full length of the surface in contact with the vacuum slot is smooth.

Re: Karcher window vac
« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2020, 08:42:29 am »
We have have one too and it is very good at removing condensation / water from windows.  It works very well on a flat surface, I don't think it would be much good on irregular surfaces.

Valiant

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Re: Karcher window vac
« Reply #6 on: November 16, 2020, 12:47:12 pm »
On a flat surface it's brilliant. I use my Lidls copy on window cleaning, spilled liquids and the shower tiles and glass.
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ian

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Re: Karcher window vac
« Reply #7 on: November 16, 2020, 12:55:09 pm »
We have one – it works, but in our case, the condensation is usually around the window edges*, so you have to wipe anyway.

*I've never figured out why, I'm sure there's a reason, but the condensation is always along the bottom edge, occasionally creeping up the side, but never in the middle of the glass. I assume there's a small temperature gradient towards the edges of the sealed unit and water vapour is heavier, so the process starts from the bottom.
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Mrs Pingu

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Re: Karcher window vac
« Reply #8 on: November 16, 2020, 05:28:34 pm »
I'm quite happy using a squeegee on the doors and panels, just thought it might be useful for the bottom of the junction but doesn't sound particularly like it would be....
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Re: Karcher window vac
« Reply #9 on: November 16, 2020, 05:35:23 pm »
We have one – it works, but in our case, the condensation is usually around the window edges*, so you have to wipe anyway.

*I've never figured out why, I'm sure there's a reason, but the condensation is always along the bottom edge, occasionally creeping up the side, but never in the middle of the glass. I assume there's a small temperature gradient towards the edges of the sealed unit and water vapour is heavier, so the process starts from the bottom.
Your's aren't the only windows to do this. Mine do it too. I've often wondered what is going on thermally to cause this. But not enough to keep me awake at night. Not while I am armed with the squeege of rubbage.

Re: Karcher window vac
« Reply #10 on: November 19, 2020, 10:46:35 am »
in our case, the condensation is usually around the window edges*, so you have to wipe anyway.

*I've never figured out why, I'm sure there's a reason, but the condensation is always along the bottom edge, occasionally creeping up the side, but never in the middle of the glass. I assume there's a small temperature gradient towards the edges of the sealed unit and water vapour is heavier, so the process starts from the bottom.

Unless you paid extra for higher-performing sealed insulating glass spacers - the parts that hold the glass apart so the air in between insulates - the spacers are the weak link in the system thermally.  If edges are colder than the center of the glass, then condensation will happen at the edges before the center. 

Then add in the cooler air settling along the face of the glass, and it will be coldest near the bottom of the frame and most likely to condense there.  And, any water that did condense higher up will be pulled downward by gravity.

ian

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Re: Karcher window vac
« Reply #11 on: November 19, 2020, 10:52:25 am »
That makes sense, we had one of the windows entirely replaced when we moved in, and that's never shown a hint of condensation. The crappy Everest windows we inherited with the house on the other hand. We also had a new sealed unit in the patio door after the gardeners murdered the existing one and that still gets some condensation, but it's in the same frame.
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