Author Topic: Phone questions?  (Read 855 times)

Phone questions?
« on: November 14, 2020, 12:15:48 pm »
My phone is stone dead and has been diagnosed as motherboard deceased and its not worth fixing so......

I live in pretty much a black spot due to location and have been told that I could use wireless connectivity to get on with which ever network I want but I cannot understand how I could connect to say three if they don't have coverage here? I was on O2 which was sometimes ok but often flakey in poor weather.

So for theis wireless connection to work does there have to be a decent signal or coverage to connect to?

Confused

PH
Bees do nothing invariably.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Phone questions?
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2020, 12:24:42 pm »
What they mean is that, in the absence of a cellular signal, you can use VOIP to make telephone calls over a broadband internet connection using WiFi.  The cellular providers have nice user-friendly ways of integrating this so it switches from one to the other automatically using the same phone number and so on.  (This is where my knowledge ends.  I live in a city and don't really do phone calls.)

Obviously this requires you to have a broadband internet connection and WiFi.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Phone questions?
« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2020, 12:25:59 pm »
I have wireless calls enabled, iPhone on Vodafone. Seems pretty common on the major networks these days....

https://www.4g.co.uk/news/ee-o2-three-and-vodafone-which-networks-offer-wi-fi-calling/

and like you our mobile coverage is flaky, notwithstanding what the network coverage estimators claim.

ETA as Kim says it hooks onto your home WiFi and broadband connection.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

Re: Phone questions?
« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2020, 12:27:08 pm »
I’m no expert on the dark arts, but when I am in or around the house my phone uses an internet connection rather than a phone signal connection. I just joined my phone to my internet magic box like I would join any other device.
Presumably it saves on “ air time”, as the phone is essentially another computer/ device on my network.
If your internet feed is good, then I think your phone should work fine, just don’t walk too far down the garden :-)
I stand to be corrected by the more techno- savvy inhabitants of the forum.

Re: Phone questions?
« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2020, 12:30:34 pm »
There are also things called femtocells which are little boxes you plug into your home broadband and they create a local mobile phone mast just for your house.

Which would solve a lot of people's problems but literally no one seems to have heard of them.

(I only do because I used to share an office with the marketing people for them. Um)

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Phone questions?
« Reply #5 on: November 14, 2020, 12:31:33 pm »
I thought those had gone out of fashion, presumably displaced by VOIP.  Probably because I haven't heard anything about them for a while.

Of course, the entire industry suffers from confusing branding and customer-friendly names like 'wireless', 'hub' and 'signal booster' obfuscating the functionality of devices to the point where you can no longer tell what it is they actually do without some tedious research.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Mrs Pingu

  • Who ate all the pies? Me
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Re: Phone questions?
« Reply #6 on: November 14, 2020, 12:37:37 pm »
There are also things called femtocells which are little boxes you plug into your home broadband and they create a local mobile phone mast just for your house.

Which would solve a lot of people's problems but literally no one seems to have heard of them.

(I only do because I used to share an office with the marketing people for them. Um)

Like this then if PH is on O2?
https://www.o2.co.uk/help/network-coverage-and-international/boostbox-guide
Do not clench. It only makes it worse.

Re: Phone questions?
« Reply #7 on: November 14, 2020, 12:42:47 pm »
Like this then if PH is on O2?
https://www.o2.co.uk/help/network-coverage-and-international/boostbox-guide

Exactly that. But "only available to business customers".

There are a few on eBay but no idea if they're more than paperweights absent an O2 business account.

Mrs Pingu

  • Who ate all the pies? Me
    • Twitter
Re: Phone questions?
« Reply #8 on: November 14, 2020, 12:47:12 pm »
Looks like O2 have Wifi calling locked into their firmware https://www.o2.co.uk/help/network-coverage-and-international/boostbox-guide
Do not clench. It only makes it worse.

Re: Phone questions?
« Reply #9 on: November 14, 2020, 03:56:50 pm »
WiFi calling works with my Samsung S10 on Vodafone and a low end Samsung work phone on EE.
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

Re: Phone questions?
« Reply #10 on: November 14, 2020, 04:27:59 pm »
Domestic femtocells (which I had with Vodafone years ago) aren’t supported now (certainly not the Voda ones) because wireless calling AFAIK.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

Adam

  • It'll soon be summer
    • Charity ride Durness to Dover 18-25th June 2011
Re: Phone questions?
« Reply #11 on: November 14, 2020, 08:29:17 pm »
You have to ensure whatever phone you get does actually provide the option to route calls over wifi (lower spec ones often don't), and that whichever network you use also has the capability.
“Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving.” -Albert Einstein

Re: Phone questions?
« Reply #12 on: November 14, 2020, 09:59:16 pm »
At a holiday house in Cornwall, where cellular coverage generally isn't, and the mobile phone dance involved standing on the highest point of the boundary wall, all the iThings started work anywhere in the house about a couple of years ago.

We assume this is either witchcraft or the fact that iThings can now do SMS and VOIP over WLAN just as easily as they have always (well for about a decade) been able to to SMS and calls on networks in any country, and internet stuff on any GSM network or WLAN.

It sort of begs the question as to why that wasn't built in from the start. I suppose the programmers / marketing people thought that WiFi with no celular coverage wouldn't be a common use case.

Of course, cellular companies have previous for poor decisions. Like:-
1) Texts not being allowed to go to another network unless the sender used in a foreign SMS service centre which made the SMSs free.
2) Cellphones that couldn't run from mains electricity, only 12 V. They could charge from mains, but not run. The assumption being that wherever there is mains, there is a cheap landline.
3) Having the phone, not the network, remember the credit on PAYG phones, on the assumption that no-one would ever hack a handset to get free calls.
4) Banning calls to a PAYG helpline from a contract phone of the same network, while allowing calls to the helpline from other networks.
5) Blocking calls to ISPs as soon as they realised that they were "digital" calls, thus preventing dial-up modem calls at high prices, which had been possible for a couple of years, without providing an alternative.
6) Making some protocol change that stopped a couple of hundred Iot things (before they were called that) from connecting. When asked, saying that nothing had changed when it clearly had. Presumable nothing changed back again six months later when they all came to life.
Quote from: Kim
Paging Diver300.  Diver300 to the GSM Trimphone, please...

Morat

  • I tried to HTFU but something went ping :(
Re: Phone questions?
« Reply #13 on: November 28, 2020, 11:02:41 am »
I've managed to break Wifi calling at work with some outbound firewall rules. At least, I'm pretty sure that's what it is. I'll have to track it down soon. If I find out what ports/services it uses I'll let you know.
Tandem Stoker, CX bike abuser (slicks and tarmac) and owner of a sadly neglected MTB.

Re: Phone questions?
« Reply #14 on: November 28, 2020, 08:20:28 pm »
I've managed to break Wifi calling at work with some outbound firewall rules. At least, I'm pretty sure that's what it is. I'll have to track it down soon. If I find out what ports/services it uses I'll let you know.

IIRC WiFi Calling uses IPSec and needs working NAT-T.
An aside that might be worth mentioning here; some home routers don't support NAT-T; some need the 'VPN Passthrough' or 'IpSec Passthrough' option enabling; others just work.
A Few Apples Short of a Strudel

Feanor

  • It's mostly downhill from here.
Re: Phone questions?
« Reply #15 on: November 28, 2020, 08:24:13 pm »
"NAT is Evil" ~RAK

Doesn't work at my office either.
Incoming call will ring, but there's no audio when you pick up.