Author Topic: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house  (Read 4172 times)

Aunt Maud

  • Le Flâneur.
Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #50 on: December 29, 2020, 08:18:05 pm »
What's that holding up ?

Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #51 on: December 29, 2020, 08:24:29 pm »
About 30 bricks and mortar, max, below the strain relief arch. Not structural otherwise BAD things would already have happened.

Aunt Maud

  • Le Flâneur.
Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #52 on: December 29, 2020, 09:24:12 pm »
Looks like tidy work. Did you do it?

Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #53 on: December 29, 2020, 09:39:11 pm »
Thank you, yes.

Aunt Maud

  • Le Flâneur.
Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #54 on: December 29, 2020, 10:58:10 pm »
Perhaps you should get rid of the roofer and go up on the roof, it's no more difficult than doing what you've already done. Don't forget to use sharp sand with the pointing and copings on the parapet.

Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #55 on: February 04, 2021, 08:56:43 pm »
Well, there has been a lot happening, I should update.

At present, I am thankful that I am doing joinery rather than takeapartery.

Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #56 on: February 05, 2021, 01:39:54 pm »
Please do update, I'm eager to read the next installment.

Mrs Pingu

  • Who ate all the pies? Me
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Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #57 on: February 05, 2021, 09:01:04 pm »
+1
Do not clench. It only makes it worse.

Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #58 on: February 05, 2021, 09:04:11 pm »
Do
Get a bicycle. You will never regret it, if you live- Mark Twain

ian

  • feat. Undead Jess & Finestre, Queen of Hell
Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #59 on: February 05, 2021, 09:04:39 pm »
If anyone wants, I can document the time I tried to put together one of those flat-packed fold-it yourself cardboard storage boxes.
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Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #60 on: February 05, 2021, 09:58:57 pm »
Well, here's some highlights.

First, managed to score 7 (yes, 7) original Victorian doors from someone local who was throwing them out, here are 4:



I've hung most of them, as in


Those interested in detail will note a compensatory compensation adjustment, compensating for the lack of rectangular posture for the building. Handsome they are, too

Next, kitchen.

Here's the before



Someone was throwing out a kitchen that had been sitting in their (leaky) garage



view the other way half way through the install



and now it looks like





Windows.

We left these a while back at the start of the process. Since which time, all vestiges of the old have been removed. To prepare for the new windows, the outside skin had to be built back in bond. While I left I could do it, I also felt a real brickie would do a better job. The guys who were doing the pebbledash removal and pointing (and doing a good job) said they could do it. Turned out they didn't even know what was needed :(

Here's the pic of the windows with the bricking they did



And after I'd finished the other three edges



Windows arrive Monday. Stone repair gets done in a about a week's time - repairing the lintel and restoring the fancy stuff for about £500 each window.


Mrs Pingu

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Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #61 on: February 05, 2021, 10:05:16 pm »
Aw, those bricks are much nicer than the harling. Are they staying like that?
Do not clench. It only makes it worse.

Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #62 on: February 06, 2021, 06:13:05 am »
Aw, those bricks are much nicer than the harling. Are they staying like that?

Yoose been in Scottie-and for a little too long.

By harling do you mean pebble dash? If so, that has just been removed at substantial cost both to us who paid for the work and the guys that are doing the work, who hadn't realised that the bricks are gaunts and so much harder than stocks which is more normal for facing in the area and are therefore taking much longer to complete on the job than they expected.

As the pebbledash had damaged the brick face, they grind back to give the finish you can see. The bricks I have used to rebuild the edge are also gaunts, so have been left slightly proud so as to allow them to be ground back flush and look exactly the same as the rest of the facings. The lintel crack is a common result of buggering around removing the windows, and will be repaired by these folk.

The next door property was in the same family, and had been identically desecrated. Here's the streetview that shows the run of terraces.

Mrs Pingu

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Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #63 on: February 06, 2021, 11:22:41 am »
I've been in Scottiland forever! Yes that is what I mean (or roughcasting, if you prefer). Looks loads better :)  The poor house will be heaving a big sigh at being able to breathe again.
Do not clench. It only makes it worse.

Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #64 on: February 06, 2021, 11:27:01 am »
Ham, until I looked at Google streetview to see how looked with the harling (I like that word), I had not appreciated quite how much painstaking effort has gone in to making the house a real 21st century quality original style Victorian house. I am so impressed!

Mrs Pingu

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Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #65 on: February 06, 2021, 11:30:53 am »
The doors are lovely too, can't believe they were being chucked. Did you get them for free?

Was just reading this about harling. "Almost impossible to remove"
https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2010/apr/21/pebbledash-homes-nick-clegg

Just looked at the streetview, agree with rr. It's going to look amazing.
Do not clench. It only makes it worse.

Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #66 on: February 06, 2021, 07:19:06 pm »


We haz eyes!!!

(and yes the doors were free!)

Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #67 on: February 07, 2021, 04:59:23 pm »
Before



and after (strictly speaking "interim" as this will be replaced with re-made newel posts and spindles, but on the lower end of the priority spectrum



Satisfying I re-used the timber taken out of that crappy partition to make it, with the exception of the "handrail" which was what was left over ripping some 4x2 down to 3x2 for the windows.

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #68 on: February 07, 2021, 05:23:16 pm »
There's room for Harry Potter too!
If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.

Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #69 on: February 08, 2021, 10:06:58 am »
 :thumbsup:
Nice one, Ham.  Is the Building Inspector happy?

Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #70 on: February 08, 2021, 11:15:01 am »
There's room for Harry Potter too!

I'm not getting the reference? Something to do with the obscure hole in the cellar door?

:thumbsup:
Nice one, Ham.  Is the Building Inspector happy?

As per https://www.gov.uk/building-regulations-approval/when-you-dont-need-approval and https://www.planningportal.co.uk/info/200130/common_projects what we are doing doesn't need approval, but we've had structural engineers look to check in case there is need to validate at some point in the future. Everything we are doing is basically quality reinstatement, there's a few things that had been done previously and (IMO) will need attention, but they can be combined with the extension that will need full planning.

Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #71 on: February 08, 2021, 11:24:13 am »
Nice windows Ham. Also those reveals are not easy to get right. DAMHIKT.
Get a bicycle. You will never regret it, if you live- Mark Twain

Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #72 on: February 08, 2021, 01:11:28 pm »
What I did was to cut a length of 6x1 so that I could wedge it in and drew a plumb line down, which gave me both a plumb and a square face to work to. What I didn't realise I would have to cope with was the uneven mortar beds of the original courses. Getting the mortar into the bond was fun, too.

Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #73 on: February 08, 2021, 06:45:57 pm »
I'm not getting the reference? Something to do with the obscure hole in the cellar door?
At the beginning of the first book, Harry Potter is living in the cupboard under the stairs because his aunt and uncle will not provide proper space for him.

Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #74 on: February 11, 2021, 10:47:32 am »
The doors are lovely too, can't believe they were being chucked. Did you get them for free?

Was just reading this about harling. "Almost impossible to remove"
https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2010/apr/21/pebbledash-homes-nick-clegg

Just looked at the streetview, agree with rr. It's going to look amazing.

Rendering old stone houses was a big thing in rural France.  Our barn was the only building left in our hameau without it.  Once on, it needs the Mairie's permission to take it off and it was not so easy to do the work.  Pointing old stone buildings isn't so easy, either..  Just don't use Portland.
Sic transit and all that..