Author Topic: Blood tracking  (Read 478 times)

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Blood tracking
« on: December 23, 2020, 10:37:43 pm »

No, not like that.

I have a pile of blood test results, every 6 months, going back for a number of years. It occured to me with this much data, I should plot a pretty graph... and keep an eye on it.

Before I put it in an openoffice spreadsheet, is there a better way of tracking blood test results? Things like cholesterol, etc...

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Auntie Helen

  • 6 Wheels in Germany
Re: Blood tracking
« Reply #1 on: December 27, 2020, 07:43:26 pm »
If you have an iPhone I think the Health app allows you to track a lot of this information, although not sure you can specify the date of the test when you enter it.

Otherwise I’m sure there’s an App for that somewhere else.
My blog on cycling in Germany and eating German cake – http://www.auntiehelen.co.uk


quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Blood tracking
« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2020, 07:45:29 pm »
If you have an iPhone I think the Health app allows you to track a lot of this information, although not sure you can specify the date of the test when you enter it.

Otherwise I’m sure there’s an App for that somewhere else.

I'm on Android. There's a lot out there, was hoping someone had good experience on something to recommend :(

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Auntie Helen

  • 6 Wheels in Germany
Re: Blood tracking
« Reply #3 on: December 27, 2020, 07:48:17 pm »
On the iPhone I use two very good apps, called Autosleep and Heartwatch, for tracking purposes. If the programmer Tantsissa also does these on Android, and a health tracking version, I would think that’s worth investigating. I don’t have an Android device to check myself, I’m afraid.
My blog on cycling in Germany and eating German cake – http://www.auntiehelen.co.uk


fboab

  • It's a fecking serious business, riding a bike
Re: Blood tracking
« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2020, 12:37:14 pm »
You can add that stuff in Training Peaks, but it might just be in the premium version. Otherwise there's a myriad of non - specific tracking apps you could use, mostly designed for habit formation, though some will allow numerical value for graphing.
TSS is not Total Sex Score, Chris!

T42

  • *** fool in a hurry
Re: Blood tracking
« Reply #5 on: December 28, 2020, 03:38:26 pm »
You could do like the NHS and use Excel 98: it'll take 16,000 lines quite easily.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Blood tracking
« Reply #6 on: December 28, 2020, 03:39:16 pm »
You could do like the NHS and use Excel 98: it'll take 16,000 lines quite easily.

Well my fallback is to use openoffice...

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Blood tracking
« Reply #7 on: December 28, 2020, 04:17:30 pm »

From a point of least effort, I've gone with just sticking it all in openoffice.

I can now make pretty graphs... boring graphs...

The most interesting thing I've learned from this exercise is that at one stage they used a different lab with a better sensitivity in it's equipment, as one of my tests came back in pmol/l, where as on all the others it's just listed as <1nmol/l

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Blood tracking
« Reply #8 on: December 28, 2020, 04:25:59 pm »
CSV file and gnuplot.  What's the point in giving this sort of data to The Man if it can't be automagically collected by an Internet Of Shit device?
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...