Author Topic: Newbie goes skiing... any tips?  (Read 4554 times)

PaulF

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Re: Newbie goes skiing... any tips?
« Reply #25 on: April 17, 2008, 04:51:11 pm »
Certainly better fitting boots would have helped - ski boots feel so 'wrong' even if they do fit that as a first timer you really don't know what to expect. If you have time can you go back to the shop when they're quieter? My experience is that when they're busy all they want to do is kick you out clutching a pair of boots. In less busy times you may find they have time to spare to give you something less uncomfortable

Re: Newbie goes skiing... any tips?
« Reply #26 on: April 17, 2008, 05:07:44 pm »
Skiing is so very uncool and only old people do it  ;)

I'm strangely drawn to wanting to have a go on a monoski.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Re: Newbie goes skiing... any tips?
« Reply #27 on: April 17, 2008, 05:12:41 pm »
How very 80s. Do you own an all in one pink ski suit too ?  :P
Those wonderful norks are never far from my thoughts, oh yeah!

Re: Newbie goes skiing... any tips?
« Reply #28 on: April 17, 2008, 05:13:35 pm »
Thanks Mark. The instructor was rubbish, tbh. He didn't give any clear instructions, didn't talk to us individually, and had us asking each other what we were actually supposed to be doing.

Having inspected my legs, I see I have little painful blood blisters all over my inside calves and shins.

The rental shop did measure my feet before handing me the boots - size 42. I wonder if a smaller boots wouldve helped.

It's not rocket science, but it is possible to screw up a task as simple as measuring feet.

As a reference point, my feet are US men's 10 1/2, UK men's 9 1/2, and I typically wear size 43 ski boots.

Note to bobb, I did learn to snowboard, I got to where I could make turns on easy groomed runs,and I decided that since I preferred the greater freedom of leg movement offered by skis, especially telemark skis.

Re: Newbie goes skiing... any tips?
« Reply #29 on: April 17, 2008, 05:16:23 pm »
Skiing is so very uncool and only old people do it  ;)

I'm strangely drawn to wanting to have a go on a monoski.

I tried a monoski at Mammoth Mountain in the mid 80s, one run was enough. They seem to combine the worst of skiing and snowboarding, IMO.

Re: Newbie goes skiing... any tips?
« Reply #30 on: April 17, 2008, 05:26:30 pm »
The best bit about skiing is as you go along a flatish run up the top of a mountain and skate past the snowboarders having to walk.  ;D ;)

Re: Newbie goes skiing... any tips?
« Reply #31 on: April 17, 2008, 05:34:01 pm »
The best bit about skiing is as you go along a flatish run up the top of a mountain and skate past the snowboarders having to walk.  ;D ;)

A decent snowboarder will always carry enough speed to get past those bits.

The best bit about snowboarding is as you finish the day, it's board under arm, stroll into the bar, get a beer and start chatting up hot Euro chicks.  The skiers are still stumbling around, unable to walk properly, dropping skis and those silly poles and generally ending up in a heap. We laugh.  ;D ;)

Those wonderful norks are never far from my thoughts, oh yeah!

Re: Newbie goes skiing... any tips?
« Reply #32 on: April 17, 2008, 06:07:36 pm »
The best bit about snowboarding is as you finish the day, it's board under arm, stroll into the bar, get a beer and start chatting up hot Euro chicks.  The skiers are still stumbling around, unable to walk properly, dropping skis and those silly poles and generally ending up in a heap. We laugh.  ;D ;)

The best bit about a ski-in ski-out chalet with a boot room that opens onto the slopes is that, at the end of the day, you ski down to the door, remove skis, walk in, take off boots and put them on the boot drying racks, change into some comfy trainers and saunter over to the bar, all within 2 minutes.

And then there's no need to carry anything. (Note that this works equally well for skiers and boarders).
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Re: Newbie goes skiing... any tips?
« Reply #33 on: April 17, 2008, 08:21:21 pm »
The best bit about skiing is as you go along a flatish run up the top of a mountain and skate past the snowboarders having to walk.  ;D ;)

A decent snowboarder will always carry enough speed to get past those bits.

The best bit about snowboarding is as you finish the day, it's board under arm, stroll into the bar, get a beer and start chatting up hot Euro chicks.  The skiers are still stumbling around, unable to walk properly, dropping skis and those silly poles and generally ending up in a heap. We laugh.  ;D ;)

And with telemark skis, you get the advantages of not having both feet attached to the same plank, while also being able to walk naturally...  ;D

If you've got the energy to go chatting up hot Euro chicks at the end of the day, you've obviously not been trying hard enough on the slopes. Then again, I have noticed that snowboarders seem to spend most of their time sat on their a***es in the snow*.  ::-) ;)


*usually just beyond a blind crest or right on the natural line of a corner.
Life is too important to be taken seriously.

Re: Newbie goes skiing... any tips?
« Reply #34 on: April 17, 2008, 11:46:07 pm »
*usually just beyond a blind crest or right on the natural line of a corner.

Being uphill it's YOUR responsibility to avoid!

I still ski occasionally, but have boarded mostly over the last 20 years. Skiing is just a bit.... Old and gay....
Those wonderful norks are never far from my thoughts, oh yeah!

Re: Newbie goes skiing... any tips?
« Reply #35 on: April 18, 2008, 01:09:25 am »
*usually just beyond a blind crest or right on the natural line of a corner.

Being uphill it's YOUR responsibility to avoid!

I still ski occasionally, but have boarded mostly over the last 20 years. Skiing is just a bit.... Old and gay....

Having decided to stop, it's your responsibility to pick a safe spot to do so, where you can reasonably be seen from above. That's Colorado law and the (US) skier's and snowboarder's responsibility code. Seems sensible and courteous to me, whether you're skiing, snowboarding, cycling or otherwise moving about where other people can be expected.

Re: Newbie goes skiing... any tips?
« Reply #36 on: April 18, 2008, 08:14:07 am »
*usually just beyond a blind crest or right on the natural line of a corner.

Being uphill it's YOUR responsibility to avoid!

True... But that doesn't make it any less discourteous, now, does it?  >:(

And while I always ski (and drive, cycle, motorcycle, etc) at a speed which allows me to stop in the distance I can see to be clear, I'd be &%*$£& insane to assume that was true of everybody else!  ;)
Life is too important to be taken seriously.

Re: Newbie goes skiing... any tips?
« Reply #37 on: April 18, 2008, 08:33:27 am »
One of the many ways skiiing is superior to snowboarding is the ability ski to the chair lift and board it without having to fanny around undoing ones binding. Same when alighting. Much less faffinf around. And it seems snowboarders are not as fit either, they spend large amounts of time just sitting in the snow, usually in the way.

peliroja

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Re: Newbie goes skiing... any tips?
« Reply #38 on: April 18, 2008, 10:33:56 am »
This seems to have turned into a skiers vs boarders thread. I never realised there was such rivalry. ;)It's akin to mtb vs road! How silly.

I think if I try skiing again I'll have 121 lessons, and be careful to get the boot fit right.

Does anyone think that my largefeetplusshort(cycling)calves may have contributed to the boot pain? I wear a 42/43 shoe but am only 5'4" tall.

Re: Newbie goes skiing... any tips?
« Reply #39 on: April 18, 2008, 11:13:29 am »
Does anyone think that my largefeetplusshort(cycling)calves may have contributed to the boot pain? I wear a 42/43 shoe but am only 5'4" tall.

Probably not. Ski boots are always instruments of torture when you first start - regardless of any bizarre genetic characteristics  ;)
Those wonderful norks are never far from my thoughts, oh yeah!

peliroja

  • Mrs Woolly
Re: Newbie goes skiing... any tips?
« Reply #40 on: April 19, 2008, 02:43:40 pm »
Having thought about it a bit more, I think I would definitely like to try it again, as I found the actual sliding down the snow part easy, found my balance well, managed to snow plough and change direction, and didn't fall over.

But how to avoid getting ill-fitting boots. Hmm. Does anyone here have their own boots, and if so, how hard do they hit one's wallet?  ???

Seineseeker

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Re: Newbie goes skiing... any tips?
« Reply #41 on: April 19, 2008, 03:57:45 pm »
The first time I went skiing I had the worst boots, and ended up with bruises all over my shins. I think you learn as time goes on which boots fit and which don't when you are in the ski hire shop.

The big downer about buying equipment is you have to carry it! Also, while you are a beginner you are basically trashing your boots and skis so better to use hired ones really.

Keep at it.

PaulF

  • "World's Scariest Barman"
  • It's only impossible if you stop to think about it
Re: Newbie goes skiing... any tips?
« Reply #42 on: April 19, 2008, 04:05:50 pm »
Having thought about it a bit more, I think I would definitely like to try it again, as I found the actual sliding down the snow part easy, found my balance well, managed to snow plough and change direction, and didn't fall over.

But how to avoid getting ill-fitting boots. Hmm. Does anyone here have their own boots, and if so, how hard do they hit one's wallet?  ???

I do but I wouldn't advise buying yet, as you progress you'll soon outgrow novice boots and  will need something better. I don't know if a London based shop will do a rental, that way you can probably find someone willing to spend a bit more time. to find something comfortable. Downside is if you have a problem in the resort then you probably won't find anyone willing to help. Do that a few times until you progress enough to justify committing to your own boots

Re: Newbie goes skiing... any tips?
« Reply #43 on: April 19, 2008, 04:06:34 pm »
Unless you do a lot of skiing (i.e. more than 4 weeks a year, and you don't have to pay to get your skis there) it's almost certainly cheaper to hire skis.

The cost of buying them, getting them there and back (sometimes more than 20 quid excess on some airlines) and getting them serviced is often more than you'd pay for a good set of hire skis. Even if you get a good return on the skis selling them a few years later.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Re: Newbie goes skiing... any tips?
« Reply #44 on: April 19, 2008, 04:10:10 pm »
But how to avoid getting ill-fitting boots. Hmm. Does anyone here have their own boots, and if so, how hard do they hit one's wallet?  ???

Not sure if I agree with Paul about "novice" boots, boots are boots.

I paid about 200 UKP to have some professionally fitted (including moulded insoles) at Snow & Rock in Covent Garden, took about an hour in total. Hire boots are 20 euros a week so it'll take a lot of trips to recoup the money but I'm very very happy I got them as they're so comfy compared to the lottery that is hire boots.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Mrs Pingu

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Re: Newbie goes skiing... any tips?
« Reply #45 on: April 20, 2008, 08:18:32 pm »
Don't know where you were skiing peli, but any resort which is a very Brit populated resort will tend to have some shops which have very good english speakers and a very good standard of equipment.
Most shops worth their salt will let you keep coming back for a change of equipment if you're not getting on with it.
I bought my first pair of new boots in Livigno in Italy, They have to be one of my worst purchases ever!

I have a similar problem to you in that I have sturdy calves but my ankles a slim and I have a very narrow heel. My boots have got a load of the extra fitting plastic that came in the box shoved in the outside of the boot inner just to stabilise my heel. If I didn't have this I would end up over tightening the buckles round the heel - which leads to a lack of blood to the toes and painful and freezing toes in a couple of hours.

I would say either next time go to a really Brit centric resort and a really good shop - hire for a week and keep going back for a change of boots until you get something which is least uncomfortable, or try going to your local  snow & rock.
My current boots I got fitted for in Aviemore and got heated insoles put in in Val d'Isere as I still suffer a bit with cold toes if I'm to get my boots done up tight enough.
I'm going to treat myself the next time we go to Val d'Isere and get custom moulded inner boots I think...££££

Glad it hasn't put you off totally!   
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Charlotte

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Re: Newbie goes skiing... any tips?
« Reply #46 on: April 21, 2008, 11:25:36 am »
Sorry you had a sub-optimal time, Vicky  :(

Don't give up though - when it all goes right, skiing's one of the most fun activities you can do with your clothes on. 

When I was skiing regularly (i.e. at least once/twice a season) I had my own skis, poles and boots.  Once I realised that carrying skis to and from the resort was a PITA, I went to renting skis only.  Once you find a pair of boots that fit, you won't want to give them back at the end of the week.

A lot of hire places will be only too happy to sell you their boots, or you can make a not of the make and model and pick up a pair in the post-season sale.

I strongly recommend having your own boots.  If only 'cos hire ones are stinky  :)
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