Author Topic: Hardy Heron  (Read 18681 times)

border-rider

Re: Hardy Heron
« Reply #100 on: May 12, 2008, 10:18:30 am »
Hardy (and Gutsy) mount Win discs automatically, I thought.

I don't remember ever going anything to access them (on this machine; you had to with earlier distros) and they just appear as desktop icons.

LJ: if you go to Places>Computer you should see the icons for the various drives.

Mine looks like this:



"Filesystem" is the Ubuntu area; "18.7 GB Media" and "48.8 GB" Media are the Win drives.

What can you see there ?


Woofage

  • Ain't no hooves on my bike.
Re: Hardy Heron
« Reply #101 on: May 12, 2008, 10:22:31 am »
MV: I'm not sure if NTFS is supported out of the box. Maybe it is in Hardy but it certainly wasn't in earlier releases. FAT certainly has been supported for years and years.

BTW, I like your icons. Mine look plain in comparison. How do I get them?
Pen Pusher

Re: Hardy Heron
« Reply #102 on: May 12, 2008, 01:02:36 pm »
My Places - Computer only shows the CD and File system Folders and nothing else. When I first installed Hardy, I found my Microshaft files easily and changed one to Open Office. My intention being to change the rest of them to Open Office. Could you guys tell me how to view a file tree? In Xandros which I have used for some time and is Debian based it was very easy to go to the root directory in File Manager and all was revealed including the contents of XP 'C" drive.

If I cannot see a file tree it may force me to re-install which I don't want to do so early in the learning process :-\

All suggestions welcome as I have spent hours searching for the solution which is rather frustrating.

Edit:-
Oh my goodness, after 3 days of searching I have located the files. They were in an $LFJ C drive  folder located now in Hardy file system/home/host. I am sure I found this much easier last time so something has obviously been changed. For safety I have dragged this folder onto the desk top as it contains many excel and word files to be moved into Open Office.

Thanks for your contributions above. ;)





"100% PURE FREAKING AWESOME"

Re: Hardy Heron
« Reply #103 on: May 19, 2008, 05:38:58 pm »
I installed Ubuntu on a Windows machine at work for a laugh today. I Love It!

I want to install it at home now. Am I better off installing it on a separate hard drive keeping it away from Microsuck? I've only done a bit of research and most of the suggestions I've seen all talk about having it on a separate partition to the Windows installation.

Surely it would be better to have it on a completely different drive? Or would it?
Those wonderful norks are never far from my thoughts, oh yeah!

Re: Hardy Heron
« Reply #104 on: May 19, 2008, 05:47:20 pm »
Surely it would be better to have it on a completely different drive? Or would it?
If you need to create or resize partitions the safest option would be a different drive. (you do of course have a backup plan?)
Something else to ask is from where, and with what, am I going to boot up with?

border-rider

Re: Hardy Heron
« Reply #105 on: May 19, 2008, 05:51:34 pm »
The installer can resize the win partition and make a new Ubuntu partition (2 actually)

The default is to use the Grub boot manager thing to choose which OS to boot to, and if the OSs are on different physical drives this may be a bit tricky.  Which may have been what dtb meant :)

Re: Hardy Heron
« Reply #106 on: May 19, 2008, 07:11:08 pm »
OK, I think I understand. I can't be arsed dicking about too much. So I'll stick it on the same drive as Windows.

So on that drive I have Windows installed on a smallish partition and the other partition is where I store all my files. Does this affect installing Ubuntu? What will it do partition wise if I bunged the disk in now? (Everything is doubly backed up btw!)
Those wonderful norks are never far from my thoughts, oh yeah!

Re: Hardy Heron
« Reply #107 on: May 19, 2008, 07:17:37 pm »
OK, I think I understand. I can't be arsed dicking about too much. So I'll stick it on the same drive as Windows.

So on that drive I have Windows installed on a smallish partition and the other partition is where I store all my files. Does this affect installing Ubuntu? What will it do partition wise if I bunged the disk in now? (Everything is doubly backed up btw!)
You will have to use an existing partition or create a new one. I don't use Ubuntu so don't know what the installer will offer. 
If I had your system I would burn a copy of Gparted and use that to sort the partitions. I've used it lots of times and have yet to lose any data. It's a program that is similar to partition magic.

Re: Hardy Heron
« Reply #108 on: May 19, 2008, 07:43:49 pm »
When I installed it at work today (on a drive with no partitions) it just automatically created one. I was just wondering which of the two partitions I have on this machine it will eat into. The space has got to come from somewhere!
Those wonderful norks are never far from my thoughts, oh yeah!

Re: Hardy Heron
« Reply #109 on: May 19, 2008, 07:49:10 pm »
When I installed it at work today (on a drive with no partitions) it just automatically created one. I was just wondering which of the two partitions I have on this machine it will eat into. The space has got to come from somewhere!
I would hope it gives you options to resize and create on an existing partition/disk. If it doesn't then cancel the install and use Gparted/Partition Magic to resize and create.

border-rider

Re: Hardy Heron
« Reply #110 on: May 19, 2008, 08:56:41 pm »
When I installed it at work today (on a drive with no partitions) it just automatically created one. I was just wondering which of the two partitions I have on this machine it will eat into. The space has got to come from somewhere!
I would hope it gives you options to resize and create on an existing partition/disk.

It does

If you let it do its automagic, it bungs Ubuntu onto the biggest free bit of volume. Or you can resize manually.   Or you could use Gparted, which is a bit more intuitive

Re: Hardy Heron
« Reply #111 on: May 19, 2008, 09:44:01 pm »
I can't get it to install properly on this machine. On the machine at work (which is almost identical spec wise to this one) it was the easiest thing in the world!

It goes through the installation process but on the final reboot, it says "Error 21: The specified disk does not exist" Or something like that.

Load of arse....

Edit: I think the problem is that there are two old IDE drives in the machine that I never use anymore. So I think I'll just unplug them and see if it works....
Those wonderful norks are never far from my thoughts, oh yeah!

Re: Hardy Heron
« Reply #112 on: May 19, 2008, 10:33:05 pm »
Sorted!

We have Umbuntoff!!  :)
Those wonderful norks are never far from my thoughts, oh yeah!

Woofage

  • Ain't no hooves on my bike.
Re: Hardy Heron
« Reply #113 on: May 20, 2008, 10:10:11 am »
Well, I spoke too soon :(. My mounting of windoze shares is borked. I can use smbclient which will get me by (for now) but my rsync backup scripts etc won't work now :-\.

I've finally fixed this. It was a slightly obscure problem ???. If anyone wants the details I'll be happy to post them!
Pen Pusher

Re: Hardy Heron
« Reply #114 on: May 21, 2008, 02:22:55 pm »
I use Skype for long distance calls and read somewhere that Hardy will automatically download and install it.

But how? I have tried installing a dowloaded linux version which is on my desktop and also a direct download and install using Applications>Add/remove. The latter cannot find Skype!

Any ideas?

Edit,
If at first you don't succeed etc. Cor blimey, five minutes after I asked the question I found the way
"100% PURE FREAKING AWESOME"

Re: Hardy Heron
« Reply #115 on: May 22, 2008, 07:59:42 am »
I is got no sound in Hardy Heron. It's starting to irritate me as I just can't get the fecker to work.

The sound card is a Creative SB Audigy SE 7.1 if that makes any difference?

How do I get this to work?!!
Those wonderful norks are never far from my thoughts, oh yeah!

Re: Hardy Heron
« Reply #116 on: May 22, 2008, 08:07:35 am »
I is got no sound in Hardy Heron. It's starting to irritate me as I just can't get the fecker to work.

The sound card is a Creative SB Audigy SE 7.1 if that makes any difference?

How do I get this to work?!!
With a console, as root, try

alsaconf


Re: Hardy Heron
« Reply #117 on: May 22, 2008, 08:20:03 am »
Hmmm, couldn't get that to work.... Gotta go to w*rk now, but will try again later. Ta del...
Those wonderful norks are never far from my thoughts, oh yeah!

Re: Hardy Heron
« Reply #118 on: May 22, 2008, 08:25:06 am »
Hmmm, couldn't get that to work.... Gotta go to w*rk now, but will try again later. Ta del...
If you got the programme to load, run and detect the sound card then maybe the volumes need adjusting.

alsamixer

adjusts the various sound controls and

alsactl store

saves the adjusted volumes.

Re: Hardy Heron
« Reply #119 on: May 22, 2008, 09:54:18 am »
Quote from: delthebike link=topic=1658.msg49552#msg49552
If you got the programme to load, run and detect the sound card then maybe the volumes need adjusting.

I didn't - I was in a bit of a hurry this morning and it wasn't having any of it...
Those wonderful norks are never far from my thoughts, oh yeah!

Maladict

Re: Hardy Heron
« Reply #120 on: June 11, 2008, 01:39:30 am »
I am just trying it out on my fastest PC with intent to replace FreeBSD 7.0 which can't even do an X display reliably if acceleration is on.

I am pleased with this - it came up with 1600x1200, and it is running fine.

I think my FreeBSD days are numbered.

Re: Hardy Heron
« Reply #121 on: June 11, 2008, 10:49:51 am »
Sound is the last great issue in Linux so far as hardware support goes really. They keep changing how it works and its a pain.
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

ian

  • feat. Undead Jess & Finestre, Queen of Hell
Re: Hardy Heron
« Reply #122 on: June 11, 2008, 12:00:34 pm »
Quote from: delthebike link=topic=1658.msg49552#msg49552
If you got the programme to load, run and detect the sound card then maybe the volumes need adjusting.

I didn't - I was in a bit of a hurry this morning and it wasn't having any of it...

I may be in danger of sounding like a stuck record, but using a different Linux distro solved all the hardware issues I had with Ubuntu (no wifi or USB). I used the Gnome desktop version of Mandriva and it recognized all the hardware on my old ultraportable with no involvement from me (as did the KDE version). I've been impressed, it's given a new lease of life to the little fellow (admittedly depriving me of an excuse to buy an eePC). Wireless, USB, VPN, Windows / Mac networking, all work fine out of the box. Even the bits that never worked in XP now work - finally video playback without dropped frames and functional scroll buttons.

And (purist geeks hide your eyes) I've not had to visit the terminal once.

It's probably worth burning a couple of different Linux distro live CDs and giving your hardware a test drive. I should have done that before entering into command line combat with Ubuntu. Ultimately the only difference I can see between Ubuntu and Mandriva is that one is blue and the other brown.
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Re: Hardy Heron
« Reply #123 on: June 11, 2008, 12:30:10 pm »
It's all to do with what stuff (i.e. specific device support) has been compiled into the kernel and what modules are supplied.

I find it very odd that many distributions ship without support for common bits of hardware by default.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Re: Hardy Heron
« Reply #124 on: June 11, 2008, 12:34:43 pm »
It depends quite often on the license under which those drivers are released. Debian for example is very strict about this and all drivers (all software infact) must be completely free and under a specific set of licenses. Others distributions will include commercial drivers (SuSE traditionally did) and others are somewhere in-between.
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.