Author Topic: Interesting and Unusual Bikes You've Seen  (Read 402049 times)

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Interesting and Unusual Bikes You've Seen
« Reply #2700 on: September 25, 2018, 02:10:50 pm »
I think the key point here is that since I know about as much about mechanical engineering as a venture capitalist, and reckon it might just about work (if not for any particular benefit), they're probably in with a decent chance...
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Interesting and Unusual Bikes You've Seen
« Reply #2701 on: September 25, 2018, 09:07:48 pm »
I saw a woman cycling down the A38 on a Strida. Bright orange. The Strida, not the woman – she looked totally non-Trumpesque. Every time I see one (a Strida, not a woman), I wonder what the point is. I suppose the same feeling, but even more so, would be appropriate on seeing the Trump.
sideways bounding monkey lounging under fruit tree

Torslanda

  • Professional Gobshite
  • Just a tart for retro kit . . .
    • John's Bikes
Re: Interesting and Unusual Bikes You've Seen
« Reply #2702 on: September 26, 2018, 05:03:39 pm »
In the dim & distant past ISTR someone - possibly Bob Dixon or maybe his Mikeness - saying that the real difficulty was in making a shaft that would withstand the torque generated by the average human. He explained it as the 'instantaneous load' being much higher than even automotive transmission components could withstand. The driveshaft appears to be a carbon fibre tube. There might be some wonder science employed in its construction . . .
VELOMANCER

Well that's the more blunt way of putting it but as usual he's dead right.

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: Interesting and Unusual Bikes You've Seen
« Reply #2703 on: September 26, 2018, 06:40:09 pm »
Shaft drive bikes have been around since the 1890s at least, using hub gears normally.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

Torslanda

  • Professional Gobshite
  • Just a tart for retro kit . . .
    • John's Bikes
Re: Interesting and Unusual Bikes You've Seen
« Reply #2704 on: September 26, 2018, 07:37:28 pm »
Yes. No argument there. I left out the bit about 'lightweight' shaft components.

I blame Thatcher...
VELOMANCER

Well that's the more blunt way of putting it but as usual he's dead right.

Re: Interesting and Unusual Bikes You've Seen
« Reply #2705 on: September 26, 2018, 09:47:29 pm »
Gut reaction. 6 months of commuting, covered in shite and the biggest ever rejected warranty claim...

I was having similar thoughts.  Fully enclose it in an oilbath or something, and it might work.

The Limoges bike scheme  (Vel'Lim) has 200 out of 250 bikes with full enclosed shaft drives. They are all the electric ones; the other 50 are unassisted and use ornery d'railleurs. Yes that is 4 out of 5 are electric bikes and they go very well. Kinda hilly, Limoges

Re: Interesting and Unusual Bikes You've Seen
« Reply #2706 on: September 26, 2018, 09:54:04 pm »
My daughter has just posted this one to me - fishing line drive anyone?
 https://www.facebook.com/Curioctopus.fr/videos/2039541016283980/

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Interesting and Unusual Bikes You've Seen
« Reply #2707 on: September 26, 2018, 10:27:52 pm »
"Let's take a rowing bike and put cranks on it."
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Mr Larrington

  • A bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
  • Custard Wallah
    • Mr Larrington's Automatic Diary
Re: Interesting and Unusual Bikes You've Seen
« Reply #2708 on: September 27, 2018, 02:02:05 pm »
In the dim & distant past ISTR someone - possibly Bob Dixon or maybe his Mikeness - saying that the real difficulty was in making a shaft that would withstand the torque generated by the average human. He explained it as the 'instantaneous load' being much higher than even automotive transmission components could withstand. The driveshaft appears to be a carbon fibre tube. There might be some wonder science employed in its construction . . .

My e-chum Bill, who is a big strong lad, noted that even an average human engine can generate as much torque as a small-block V8*.  Quite what makes a V8 block "small" is debatable but the cutoff seems to be somewhere north of 6 litres.

* he's USAnian
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

Re: Interesting and Unusual Bikes You've Seen
« Reply #2709 on: September 27, 2018, 02:12:39 pm »
In the dim & distant past ISTR someone - possibly Bob Dixon or maybe his Mikeness - saying that the real difficulty was in making a shaft that would withstand the torque generated by the average human. He explained it as the 'instantaneous load' being much higher than even automotive transmission components could withstand. The driveshaft appears to be a carbon fibre tube. There might be some wonder science employed in its construction . . .

My e-chum Bill, who is a big strong lad, noted that even an average human engine can generate as much torque as a small-block V8*.  Quite what makes a V8 block "small" is debatable but the cutoff seems to be somewhere north of 6 litres.

* he's USAnian
Block size is (semi) independent of cubic capacity - it's literally about how big the block is.  You can get 400ci small blocks and 350ci big blocks. Big blocks have a higher ceiling in terms of capacity and are much heavier though. The original Shelby Cobra 427 used a big block. The engine probably weighed twice as much as the rest of the car (and the passengers).

Mr Larrington

  • A bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
  • Custard Wallah
    • Mr Larrington's Automatic Diary
Re: Interesting and Unusual Bikes You've Seen
« Reply #2710 on: September 28, 2018, 11:41:53 am »
Though it was still surprising to find the 6.2L lump in Corvette is a small block...
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Interesting and Unusual Bikes You've Seen
« Reply #2711 on: October 08, 2018, 06:34:52 pm »
There are always a variety of bikes outside the sports centre up the road but they're not normally particularly interesting. On Sunday however there was a striking contrast between two bikes parked either side of the same stand. On one side was a Temple. This is a locally based brand using neo-retro frames produced in, I think, Taiwan, using lugs and Reynolds tubes. This one was 720. It was painted glossy battleship grey (if "glossy battleship" isn't an oxymoron :o), which seems to be Temple's favourite colour, and finished in typical modern components. But the bike on the other side of the stand was an unmarked (not even a manufacturer's badge) burnished titanium fat-tube frame, with S and S couplings. It was road geometry with drop bars but, interestingly, a telefork. And Sram one-by drivetrain. I would presume it was intended for cyclocross – but are suspension forks allowed in 'cross? and why would you go to the expense and extra weight of making a cross bike foldable? So instead, I guess it was a gnarmac adventure bike for far-flung travel.
sideways bounding monkey lounging under fruit tree

handcyclist

  • watch for my signal
Re: Interesting and Unusual Bikes You've Seen
« Reply #2712 on: October 09, 2018, 07:32:10 pm »
A very blue fully enclosed HPV recumbent winding up Western Road out of Tring yesterday ......
Doubt is is not a pleasant condition, but certainty is absurd.

Re: Interesting and Unusual Bikes You've Seen
« Reply #2713 on: October 09, 2018, 09:02:51 pm »
That reminds me, on my way home from work on Friday, I spotted a very laid back highracer recumbent, heading into Ely from the North. I think it was a Schlitter as the frame tubes looked flat sided.
If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Interesting and Unusual Bikes You've Seen
« Reply #2714 on: October 15, 2018, 06:19:12 pm »
This cracking example from the department of "just glue some gears on it and call it Steampunk" just popped up in one of my eBay searches: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/382591714123

All together now...
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/TFCuE5rHbPA&rel=1" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/v/TFCuE5rHbPA&rel=1</a>
https://youtu.be/TFCuE5rHbPA
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Re: Interesting and Unusual Bikes You've Seen
« Reply #2715 on: October 17, 2018, 09:30:58 pm »

All together now...
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/TFCuE5rHbPA&rel=1" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/v/TFCuE5rHbPA&rel=1</a>
https://youtu.be/TFCuE5rHbPA

That is brilliant  ;D
Quote from: Kim
^ This woman knows what she's talking about.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Interesting and Unusual Bikes You've Seen
« Reply #2716 on: October 18, 2018, 10:41:40 am »


Robin Mather was a custom builder in Bath from about 2012 to roughly 2015. I don't know how many bikes he built but you very rarely see them.
sideways bounding monkey lounging under fruit tree

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Interesting and Unusual Bikes You've Seen
« Reply #2717 on: October 18, 2018, 10:42:35 am »


Bike with Buddhist prayer flags (or something very similar).
sideways bounding monkey lounging under fruit tree

Re: Interesting and Unusual Bikes You've Seen
« Reply #2718 on: October 18, 2018, 11:36:33 am »
(OT: what are the Liverpool hire scheme bikes like to ride? I noticed they all use shaft drive, and wondered how they held up under typical (ab)use...)

The shaft-drive Mobikes (that I've ridden in That London, and That Berlin) have a single, very low gear so you have to spin at 150 rpm to go anywhere. This must greatly limit the amount of torque you can put through the shaft.

(Second generation Mobikes that use chain drives and 3-speed IGH are more common now, or at least were until Mobike retreated to a pointlessly small operating area in London)

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Interesting and Unusual Bikes You've Seen
« Reply #2719 on: October 19, 2018, 12:32:50 pm »


A Pashley with handpainted chaincase seen in LBS window.
sideways bounding monkey lounging under fruit tree

Re: Interesting and Unusual Bikes You've Seen
« Reply #2720 on: October 22, 2018, 10:55:11 pm »
(OT: what are the Liverpool hire scheme bikes like to ride? I noticed they all use shaft drive, and wondered how they held up under typical (ab)use...)

The shaft-drive Mobikes (that I've ridden in That London, and That Berlin) have a single, very low gear so you have to spin at 150 rpm to go anywhere. This must greatly limit the amount of torque you can put through the shaft.

(Second generation Mobikes that use chain drives and 3-speed IGH are more common now, or at least were until Mobike retreated to a pointlessly small operating area in London)

I *think* the Liverpool bikes had shaft drive + 3-speed IGHs, though I may well be mistaken.

My most recent interesting bike was a Flying Gate being used for shopping - racks front and back, with what looked like a wooden wine box fitted to the front one.

Re: Interesting and Unusual Bikes You've Seen
« Reply #2721 on: November 03, 2018, 07:53:39 pm »
Strada velomobile spotted in my village - had a brief chat with the rider outside the co-op.

Another local took this photo:
If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...

Auntie Helen

  • 6 Wheels in Germany
Re: Interesting and Unusual Bikes You've Seen
« Reply #2722 on: November 03, 2018, 10:00:34 pm »
Do you know who it was? Was he a Brit?
My blog on cycling in Germany and eating German cake – http://www.auntiehelen.co.uk


Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Interesting and Unusual Bikes You've Seen
« Reply #2723 on: November 10, 2018, 06:53:44 pm »
Yesterday, a Kingcycle (80s or 90s looking recumbent).
Today, a Circe Helios with little girl as pilot and dad as stoker.
sideways bounding monkey lounging under fruit tree

Re: Interesting and Unusual Bikes You've Seen
« Reply #2724 on: November 10, 2018, 07:07:16 pm »
Do you know who it was? Was he a Brit?

I had a chat to him - A Brit, I believe from Cambridge area. I believe this is the one Andrew English sold earlier this year.
If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...