Author Topic: How Not To Lock Up Your Bike  (Read 16284 times)

cygnet

  • I'm part of the association
Re: How Not To Lock Up Your Bike
« Reply #25 on: March 12, 2018, 05:22:10 pm »
Wouldn't you still have to work the front wheel through the chain though?
Reasonably Inconsiderate

Re: How Not To Lock Up Your Bike
« Reply #26 on: March 12, 2018, 05:39:12 pm »
But perhaps more interesting is the creative solution to making beam racks Not Shit:  Simply install them over an existing rack to help keep things lined up.

More likely is that the beam rack bag is incompatible with a normal rack so moving the whole beam rack setup between bikes (I'm assuming it's normally used on another bike that cannot fit a rack) is easier than decanting and repacking the contents.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: How Not To Lock Up Your Bike
« Reply #27 on: March 12, 2018, 05:43:25 pm »
But perhaps more interesting is the creative solution to making beam racks Not Shit:  Simply install them over an existing rack to help keep things lined up.

More likely is that the beam rack bag is incompatible with a normal rack so moving the whole beam rack setup between bikes (I'm assuming it's normally used on another bike that cannot fit a rack) is easier than decanting and repacking the contents.

My guess was that it was to avoid the owner having to bend too much, which would also explain the poor locking style.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: How Not To Lock Up Your Bike
« Reply #28 on: March 12, 2018, 09:01:28 pm »
Today's Badly Locked Bike of Birmingham:


Doesn't look so badly locked to me. It would take some time to remove wheel and stem (do the bars fold up on that?) and then thread the frame out of the chain. Probably significant enough time that it would be far more likely for a thief to just cut the chain. And if you were gone for that long anyway (ie long enough to do it without cutting), the luggage would be stolen/emptied anyway.
Days become simply the spaces between dreams, spaces between the shifting floors of time...

Re: How Not To Lock Up Your Bike
« Reply #29 on: March 13, 2018, 07:04:54 pm »
Alas no pictures but saw one of those d lock and cable combinations but the d lock was round the bike and the cable was round the fence so no need or advantage from the d lock

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: How Not To Lock Up Your Bike
« Reply #30 on: March 13, 2018, 07:25:32 pm »

The next part of poorly locked of Amsterdam:



I don't know which impresses me most, the fact that they seem to have entirely missed the frame, or the Cameron approach to bollards...

Nearby I also found this offering for the similar range: what the fsck bikes of Amsterdam...



J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Re: How Not To Lock Up Your Bike
« Reply #31 on: March 13, 2018, 09:48:01 pm »
That second photo's a real journey isn't it? I started by thinking they'd actually got the frame properly, but it's a poor way to secure the saddle...Then there's a bent light, revealing no handlebars. And in turn, no brakes either...or cabling. Cold that day?

First one's got a horseshoe lock on the front at least, which could more efficiently be fitted to the rear triangle like yon white thing in the background.
Cruzbike V2k, S40

Pingu

  • Put away those fiery biscuits!
  • Mrs Pingu's domestique
    • the Igloo
Re: How Not To Lock Up Your Bike
« Reply #32 on: March 13, 2018, 10:11:22 pm »

IMG_4819 by The Pingus, on Flickr

Re: How Not To Lock Up Your Bike
« Reply #33 on: March 14, 2018, 08:20:48 am »
That second photo's a real journey isn't it? I started by thinking they'd actually got the frame properly, but it's a poor way to secure the saddle...Then there's a bent light, revealing no handlebars. And in turn, no brakes either...or cabling. Cold that day?

Erm, the frame is locked to the fence, and it's almost certainly been abandoned when the owner returned to find the handlebars (and possibly front brake) had been stolen, it looks like it retains a rear (coaster) brake though, so all is not lost. (Or it was abandoned by the owner and, over time, the handlebars/front-brakes have been stripped off it.)

Where bikes are ubiquitous there would have been little need to lock a cheap bike like this any more securely. No standard locking strategy will prevent your handlebars being stolen and it's probably cheaper to just get another hack bike than try and replace the stolen components.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: How Not To Lock Up Your Bike
« Reply #34 on: March 14, 2018, 08:28:55 am »
The "portable" horseshoe lock on Quixoticgeek's first photo is interesting. I wonder if it just came loose over time or if it was deliberately removed, perhaps from another frame? Or perhaps bought separately and never fitted?
Days become simply the spaces between dreams, spaces between the shifting floors of time...

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: How Not To Lock Up Your Bike
« Reply #35 on: March 21, 2018, 11:58:48 am »
Not uploading the photos in case they're needed for evidence, but with several sturdy-looking cable locks in central Birmingham, when there's a guy with some suboptimally-sized bolt-cutters about.

I called the police to give a running commentary, and Bullring security decended from several directions in about the time it took for him to cut through the first lock.  Hopefully that's saved someone's bike (and in the unlikely event that he's the legitimate owner, reassured him that somebody gives a fuck).
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Basil

  • Um....err......oh bugger!
  • Help me!
Re: How Not To Lock Up Your Bike
« Reply #36 on: March 21, 2018, 12:13:06 pm »
Well done, Kim.
Quote from: Kim
And remember that friends who organise things on Facebook aren't proper friends anyway.

Re: How Not To Lock Up Your Bike
« Reply #37 on: March 21, 2018, 01:05:15 pm »
awesome.

<i>Marmite slave</i>

Re: How Not To Lock Up Your Bike
« Reply #38 on: March 21, 2018, 01:59:34 pm »
Very cool. Nice one.
Rust never sleeps

Re: How Not To Lock Up Your Bike
« Reply #39 on: March 21, 2018, 02:06:47 pm »
Commendable.

Re: How Not To Lock Up Your Bike
« Reply #40 on: March 21, 2018, 02:47:58 pm »
Well done Kim.
Get a bicycle. You will never regret it, if you live- Mark Twain

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: How Not To Lock Up Your Bike
« Reply #41 on: March 21, 2018, 06:40:32 pm »
Not uploading the photos in case they're needed for evidence, but with several sturdy-looking cable locks in central Birmingham, when there's a guy with some suboptimally-sized bolt-cutters about.

I called the police to give a running commentary, and Bullring security decended from several directions in about the time it took for him to cut through the first lock.  Hopefully that's saved someone's bike (and in the unlikely event that he's the legitimate owner, reassured him that somebody gives a fuck).

Nicely done! Do post the photos once they are no longer needed as evidence (or are public domain)

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Re: How Not To Lock Up Your Bike
« Reply #42 on: March 21, 2018, 10:08:17 pm »
Good spot, most impressive is that the local coppers actually gave a f#$k.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: How Not To Lock Up Your Bike
« Reply #43 on: March 21, 2018, 10:19:02 pm »
Good spot, most impressive is that the local coppers actually gave a f#$k.

The operator seemed disappointed when it transpired that I wasn't talking about a motorbike, but I guessed that being between two major railway stations and in the shadow of some of Birmingham's finest Retail Opportunities meant there was a decent chance of a response quick enough to catch them red-handed.  Presumably the police are used to coordinating with the BTP and private security in the area, and the Bullring rent-a-cops were happy deal with something a little more constructive than intimidating teenagers and shooing away homeless people.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

CrazyEnglishTriathlete

  • Miles eaten don't satisfy hunger
  • Chartered accountant in 5 different decades
    • CET Ride Reports and Blogs
Re: How Not To Lock Up Your Bike
« Reply #44 on: March 21, 2018, 10:23:23 pm »
I'm sure I'm going to criticise anyone else.  Having problems working out how to lock an Airnimal to anything, when you the bike is designed to be taken apart with an Allen Key in 10 minutes.
Eddington Numbers 125 (imperial), 175 (metric) 528 (furlongs)  112 (nautical miles)

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: How Not To Lock Up Your Bike
« Reply #45 on: March 22, 2018, 12:25:00 am »
Nicely done! Do post the photos once they are no longer needed as evidence (or are public domain)

I've just got round to actually looking at them (I've been busy in London all day).  One of them is a work of art.  Shifty look straight into the lens with bolt cutters and lock visible.  You couldn't pose one better.

Bike is an Ammaco (I thought they made crash barriers for motorways) low-end hybrid.  Three cable locks, the sturdiest of which looks like an armoured type, but not of an obvious brand.  The armour put up a respectable fight against the bolt cutters, considering, but that's not much good when most people just walk past without doing anything.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: How Not To Lock Up Your Bike
« Reply #46 on: March 22, 2018, 08:33:09 am »
I thought Ammaco was an oil company! (Amoco, Armco, can't these businesses think up distinctive names?) Ammaco sponsored Tony Doyle when he was World Pursuit Champion, but the bikes were built by Chas Roberts and the brand is now sold at Tesco.

Good work, Kim.
Days become simply the spaces between dreams, spaces between the shifting floors of time...

ElyDave

  • Royal and Ancient Polar Bear Society member 263583
Re: How Not To Lock Up Your Bike
« Reply #47 on: March 22, 2018, 08:54:27 am »
Amoco - bought by BP, late 90's, who then blew up the Texas City refinery.  I've been to a couple of ex Amoco, and now Ex-BP platforms in the north sea, they were built in a low cost era

Armco - crash barrier for bouncing cars off
“Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.” –Charles Dickens

Re: How Not To Lock Up Your Bike
« Reply #48 on: March 22, 2018, 11:33:41 am »
I'm sure I'm going to criticise anyone else.  Having problems working out how to lock an Airnimal to anything, when you the bike is designed to be taken apart with an Allen Key in 10 minutes.
Can you get a mini-u lock around a frame beam member, then use that as a locking point?

Gets a bit ridiculous though, you'll need to carry 3 locks. I'm not sure I'd dare leave an Airnimal anywhere.
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Re: How Not To Lock Up Your Bike
« Reply #49 on: March 22, 2018, 07:20:39 pm »
Amoco - bought by BP, late 90's, who then blew up the Texas City refinery.  I've been to a couple of ex Amoco, and now Ex-BP platforms in the north sea, they were built in a low cost era

Armco - crash barrier for bouncing cars off
Pretty much everything that has gone wrong for BP since then (except for the Russian debacle) has happened in the US in what was legacy Amoco. My then boss asked an assembled townhall what the connection between a whole series of reputation-damaging BP disasters was. "Americans" I replied. I think he was looking for "lack of control" as the answer.
Rust never sleeps