Author Topic: Grammar that makes you cringe  (Read 392465 times)

Salvatore

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Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5300 on: May 08, 2019, 01:05:47 pm »
Ta, but she spoke of the old copy of the book as being her "crombie".  Had it been a copy of the Times and she lived under a bridge I could understand the vestimentary reference, but I gather she doesn't. Could a crombie also mean a vademecum or a staff to be relied on, like Bradshaw's or the OS 1-inch series?

The OED only mentions the coat.

Quote
et avec John, excellent lecteur de road-book, on s'en est sortis sans erreur

citoyen

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Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5301 on: May 08, 2019, 01:09:36 pm »
You'd have to ask her what she means by the term - it might not correspond to what others mean or understand by it. This is the trouble with slang - people hear words being used and pick them up but without an understanding of what they mean or where they come from to inform their usage.

ian

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Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5302 on: May 08, 2019, 01:32:18 pm »
Or she could be like me and occasionally make-up words because she thinks they sound like the right sort of word for the intended meaning.
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Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5303 on: May 08, 2019, 01:50:23 pm »
Indeed. A perfectly cromulent thing to do.

T42

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Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5304 on: May 08, 2019, 01:53:40 pm »
Ta, but she spoke of the old copy of the book as being her "crombie".  Had it been a copy of the Times and she lived under a bridge I could understand the vestimentary reference, but I gather she doesn't. Could a crombie also mean a vademecum or a staff to be relied on, like Bradshaw's or the OS 1-inch series?

The OED only mentions the coat.

That's all anyone mentions.

You'd have to ask her what she means by the term - it might not correspond to what others mean or understand by it. This is the trouble with slang - people hear words being used and pick them up but without an understanding of what they mean or where they come from to inform their usage.

Missus did. Helpful reply was: "everyone uses it".

Or she could be like me and occasionally make-up words because she thinks they sound like the right sort of word for the intended meaning.

I just can't crombie some people.  I'm going to crombie over to the workshop & make some dust crombie.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

T42

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Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5305 on: May 08, 2019, 01:55:12 pm »
Apple crombie, now, that'd be something else.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

Cudzoziemiec

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Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5306 on: May 08, 2019, 01:57:39 pm »
Is the cromby issue distressing you?
https://books.google.co.uk/books/about/Psychology_Mental_Health_and_Distress.html?id=3CmHMgEACAAJ&source=kp_book_description&redir_esc=y
Quote
Psychology, Mental Health and Distress
Front Cover
John Cromby, Dave Harper, Paula Reavey
Macmillan Education UK, 27 Feb 2013 - Psychology - 452 pages
0 Reviews
Is depression simply the result of chemical imbalances, or Schizophrenia a wholly biological disorder? What role do the broader circumstances of an individual’s social, cultural and heuristic world play in the wider scheme of their psychological wellbeing? In this ground-breaking and highly innovative text, Cromby et al deliver an introduction to the the biopsychosocial paradigm for understanding and treating psychological distress, taking into consideration the wider contexts that engender the onset of mental illness and critiquing the limitations in the sole use of the biomedical model in psychological practice. Rather than biologically determined or clinically measurable, readers are encouraged to consider mental illness as a subjective experience that is expressed according to the individual experiences of the sufferer rather than the rigidity of diagnostic categories. Similarly, approaches to recovery expand beyond psychiatric medication to consider the fundamental function of methods such as psychotherapy, community psychology and service-user movements in the recovery process. Offering a holistic account of the experience of psychological distress, this text draws upon not only statistical evidence but places an integral emphasis on the service-user experience; anecdotal accounts of which feature throughout in order to provide readers with the perspective of the mental health sufferer.

Taking an integrative approach to the psychology of mental health, the authors draw from a wealth of experience, examples and approaches to present this student-friendly and engaging text. This is core reading for anyone serious about understanding mental health issues and is suitable for undergraduate students taking introductory courses in psychology and abnormal psychology.
The unwilling rider and the one who leaves each control in turn without reluctance, with no desire to come back, obviously cannot be making the same journey, even though their brevets are identical.

Mr Larrington

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Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5307 on: May 08, 2019, 02:00:18 pm »
DM: Graun headline: Creepy men slide into women's DMs all the time, but they can be shut down.  Doc Martens? Drogerie Markt?  Diuretic Marmalade???

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Quote
Crombie: Friend of missus's used it to refer to an old copy of a book, and when queried replied "but everyone uses it" without elaborating. The only crombie I know of takes a capital and is a coat.  Can someone please explain?

A synonym for hesh.  ;)

I believe it comes from Abercrombie & Fitch - a clothing brand that is popular among today's youth.

'Hesh', as any fule kno, is an acronym for "High explosive squash head", wot is a type of ammunition used in anti-tank weapons. Firing old books at armour-plated mechanical behemoths is rarely a sound tactic.  Even Dickens is no match for a T-72.
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Cudzoziemiec

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Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5308 on: May 08, 2019, 02:30:54 pm »
No, it's an alternative form of jute.  :D
http://www.thrashermagazine.com/articles/magazine/hésh/
Quote
THE TERM “HESH” AND THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST seem to go hand-in-hand. But what does hesh mean? It’s not easily defined, and there’s certainly lots of room for interpretation. Most would agree it’s derived from the word “Hessian,”
The unwilling rider and the one who leaves each control in turn without reluctance, with no desire to come back, obviously cannot be making the same journey, even though their brevets are identical.

nicknack

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Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5309 on: May 08, 2019, 03:26:02 pm »
And there was me thinking that it was marijuana smoked by aristos.
There's no vibrations, but wait.

T42

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Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5310 on: May 08, 2019, 04:59:06 pm »
DM: Graun headline: Creepy men slide into women's DMs all the time, but they can be shut down.  Doc Martens? Drogerie Markt?  Diuretic Marmalade???

Direct messages (ie private communication on social media channels)

Quote
Crombie: Friend of missus's used it to refer to an old copy of a book, and when queried replied "but everyone uses it" without elaborating. The only crombie I know of takes a capital and is a coat.  Can someone please explain?

A synonym for hesh.  ;)

I believe it comes from Abercrombie & Fitch - a clothing brand that is popular among today's youth.

'Hesh', as any fule kno, is an acronym for "High explosive squash head", wot is a type of ammunition used in anti-tank weapons. Firing old books at armour-plated mechanical behemoths is rarely a sound tactic.  Even Dickens is no match for a T-42.

FTFY.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

T42

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Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5311 on: May 25, 2019, 04:49:44 pm »
People using us when it should be we. Nobody (well, no competent speakers of Englísh, that is) would say "what us have to do is..." but they would happily say "what us cyclists have to do is...".  Do they think we... sounds Tory, or what? Inverted grammatical snobbery?

It's utterly wrong.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Dormant but requires tea
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5312 on: June 02, 2019, 06:21:18 pm »
Quote
Use lower case for East, west, south and north unless they form part of a proper name:
North Korea, South Africa, but northeast India.
From a style guide.  :facepalm:
The unwilling rider and the one who leaves each control in turn without reluctance, with no desire to come back, obviously cannot be making the same journey, even though their brevets are identical.

Kim

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Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5313 on: June 11, 2019, 08:16:16 pm »
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/world-us-canada-48602172/driver-films-people-crawling-out-of-manhole-cover-in-border-town

Look, it's not complicated:  A manhole is a void underneath the ground to allow people to access buried utilities, etc.  A manhole cover is the bloody great solid thing that goes on top to cover it up...
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

T42

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Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5314 on: June 12, 2019, 08:02:21 am »
Strange-ish: the URL contains 'cover' but the page it lands on doesn't.  Someone at the Beeb has been doing some backing & filling.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5315 on: June 12, 2019, 04:09:45 pm »
Strange-ish: the URL contains 'cover' but the page it lands on doesn't.  Someone at the Beeb has been doing some backing & filling.
Yeah, the text on the page has been edited. The captions in the video itself were always fine.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Cudzoziemiec

  • Dormant but requires tea
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5316 on: June 13, 2019, 03:17:21 pm »
Discussing the registration of "illegible refugees" to receive benefits.
The unwilling rider and the one who leaves each control in turn without reluctance, with no desire to come back, obviously cannot be making the same journey, even though their brevets are identical.

Tim Hall

  • I want to eat the fleeting shade of your lashes
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5317 on: June 19, 2019, 02:49:38 pm »
"Shop" as in "Shop $newshinything" when what is meant is "Shop FOR $newshinything." Or even "Buy $newshinything."  It's a useage that's becoming more common, especially on websites.

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T42

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Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5318 on: June 19, 2019, 04:12:59 pm »
Same thing happened to search.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Dormant but requires tea
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5319 on: June 20, 2019, 05:34:24 pm »
From Fowler's entry on portmanteau:
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Pakistan is a mixture of a portmanteau word and an acronym: it is said to be compounded of elements from Punjab, Afghan Frontier, Kashmir, Sind and Baluchistan.
The spurious backronym is clearly neither a recent phenomenon nor restricted to urban myth and bad journalism. The origin of Pakistan is the word pak meaning pure, clean, in both physical and spiritual senses, as in Pak Butchers. Pakistan is the Land of the Pure.
The unwilling rider and the one who leaves each control in turn without reluctance, with no desire to come back, obviously cannot be making the same journey, even though their brevets are identical.

Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5320 on: June 20, 2019, 08:58:04 pm »
"This train is heavily commuterised until..."

There was me thinking that I was using the train, but instead I seems to be one of the bullying crowd commuterisng the poor thing until we got off...

Cudzoziemiec

  • Dormant but requires tea
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5321 on: June 26, 2019, 11:36:26 am »
"they have embraced the opportunity to create their own special brand of uniqueness"
No everyday uniqueness here.
https://www.bristol247.com/opinion/your-say/stokes-croft-is-a-shining-example-for-other-areas-to-follow/
The unwilling rider and the one who leaves each control in turn without reluctance, with no desire to come back, obviously cannot be making the same journey, even though their brevets are identical.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Dormant but requires tea
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5322 on: July 10, 2019, 08:16:18 pm »
A Korean woman is being interviewed in English. She works in Geneva and although her English is pretty decent, she's clearly more used to using French in daily life. "I think it happened end of two-thousand-dix-sept or 'dix-huit." And the way it comes off her tongue, she doesn't even realize she's moved from one not-Korean to another.  :)
The unwilling rider and the one who leaves each control in turn without reluctance, with no desire to come back, obviously cannot be making the same journey, even though their brevets are identical.

ElyDave

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Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5323 on: July 10, 2019, 09:27:37 pm »
I don't get why that should make you cringe, a non-English speaking native, speaking in two languages for our delight. 

My wife occaisionally throws Hindi and Punjabi words into sentences at random just because she's thinking in both
“Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.” –Charles Dickens

Cudzoziemiec

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Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5324 on: July 11, 2019, 11:56:59 am »
It doesn't make me cringe at all. (In fact, very little in this thread does.) It makes me  :)
The unwilling rider and the one who leaves each control in turn without reluctance, with no desire to come back, obviously cannot be making the same journey, even though their brevets are identical.