Author Topic: Idiot's guide to shareware.  (Read 9256 times)

border-rider

Re: Idiot's guide to shareware.
« Reply #50 on: May 23, 2008, 12:12:47 pm »

I've had similar experiences to Rae and MalV... The last time I tried Open Office, it simply wasn't up to the job. Lacked format control, cacked out on large, complex docs that Word was quite happy with.

That's not my experience.  I made the point that large bloaty organisations put great store by consistency of look and feel, and therefore MS stuff has a benefit they're happy to pay for.  I use OO on Linux for my every day work and I don't have any problems with it at all.

Any format-wandering (and TBH it's not that severe) comes when you import into Office, and it's no worse than you get with Office for Win/Office for Mac, or with Office 9X into 2003 or 2007.

Edit: wot pcolbeck said :)

Re: Idiot's guide to shareware.
« Reply #51 on: May 23, 2008, 12:21:38 pm »
For most casual user they cant really tell the difference. I have installed OpenOffice on a few PCs for friends who have bought them and then gone "but there's no applications". I just label the Writer Icon "Word Processor" etc and set it to save in Word 97 format and they seem quite happy. They even refer to it as Word so no real training is needed.
The problem comes when you have power users of Word or Excel who know all the short cuts, have loads of macros, know where every option is in the menus etc. They find OpenOffice unfamiliar and it slows them down and they don't like it - people hate change. This is not a fault with OpenOffice just that they are very familiar with Microsoft Office. If they had been using OpenOffice for years then you asked them to switch to MS Office they would hate MS Office and come up with loads of reasons why it was no good. This is a real issue in any business and needs to be taken into account when changing to a different software product for a task. Sometimes the pain is not worth the cost saving as the cost saving gets eaten up by the drop in productivity and the time taken converting macros etc.
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

Re: Idiot's guide to shareware.
« Reply #52 on: May 23, 2008, 01:33:20 pm »

I've had similar experiences to Rae and MalV... The last time I tried Open Office, it simply wasn't up to the job. Lacked format control, cacked out on large, complex docs that Word was quite happy with.

That's not my experience.  I made the point that large bloaty organisations put great store by consistency of look and feel, and therefore MS stuff has a benefit they're happy to pay for.  I use OO on Linux for my every day work and I don't have any problems with it at all.

Any format-wandering (and TBH it's not that severe) comes when you import into Office, and it's no worse than you get with Office for Win/Office for Mac, or with Office 9X into 2003 or 2007.

Edit: wot pcolbeck said :)

"cacked out" = froze, had to kill OO in order to get things going again. Not format wandering.

I maybe should point out that I'm an ancient duffer (well, in IT terms), so I've worked with a heck of a lot of word processors.
Corporates often see Word as 'free'; it has to be installed anyway, so employees should use that rather than whining and demanding Framemaker or suchlike. This means I have a lot of experience of 'gentling' multi-hundred page Word documents.
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cc93

Re: Idiot's guide to shareware.
« Reply #53 on: May 23, 2008, 03:37:42 pm »
From Asus webpage on the Eee PC 900


Providing Suitable Environments for Different Needs

To suit differing user requirements, the Eee PC 900 comes in both Microsoft Windows and Linux versions.

The Microsoft Windows version offers more experienced users an enhanced and innovative experience that incorporates Windows Live features like Windows Live Messenger for instant messaging and Windows Live Mail for consolidated email accounts on the user´s desktop. Complementing this is Microsoft Works, which equips the user with numerous office applications to work efficiently.

The Linux version is useful for users who desire task-based icons and an easy point-and-click interface. Well suited for children or users without any computer experience, it provides a fast boot-up time– ideal for fast Internet access while waiting for public transport, or taking notes on-the-go.


(my bold type) - I wonder if they got Windows at a discount for that  :)

border-rider

Re: Idiot's guide to shareware.
« Reply #54 on: May 23, 2008, 03:44:11 pm »
Yebbut the out-of-the-box interface on the eeePC is decidedly Fisher-Price, on purpose.  It is indeed aimed at non-technical people.  Even with the distro it comes with you get instructions on how to swap it for the "advanced (=XFCE) desktop".  With that you can do all the Compiz/fusion eyecandy stuff.

Interesting that with the Win version you get Works.  If you want an equivalent set of apps to the default ones on the Linux version you'd need to shell out for Office.  Note also the difference in boot time twixt XP and Linux.

You even get Open Office on the basic eeePC 2G Surf with minimal memory and storage at under £200.

Fascinating isn't it that for the first time we are being sold Linux as "easy and for the beginner" and XP as "for the expert user" :)

I have to say that that is fair enough if you can stand to use the Fisher-Price interface. 

Re: Idiot's guide to shareware.
« Reply #55 on: May 23, 2008, 03:45:19 pm »
Quote
The Microsoft Windows version offers more experienced users an enhanced and innovative experience that incorporates Windows Live features like Windows Live Messenger for instant messaging and Windows Live Mail for consolidated email accounts on the user´s desktop. Complementing this is Microsoft Works, which equips the user with numerous office applications to work efficiently.
You've got to hand it to Steve Ballmer; that particular turd is buffed to perfection, with three coats of carnuba wax  ;D
And Darkness and Decay and the Coronavirus held illimitable dominion over all.